True love is never lost—but how much loss can it endure? Iris confronts the complexities of family and prejudice in this exquisite and searing debut novel whose “understated, gently embellished prose cuts to the bone” (Booklist, starred review). Just two months after her mother abandons her family, leaving her gruff, introverted father to raise two children alone, Iris watches a family of gypsies set up an illegal camp in the paddock by her house. The gypsy boy, Trick, is restless and warm and full of life—he’ll settle when he’s in his grave, he tells Iris—and she feels as though she understands him completely. Yet even as Iris’s secret friendship with Trick blooms into something more, tensions run high between their families. Iris’s father is bent on evicting the travelers, and her beloved brother Sam is impulsive, lost, and headed for trouble. But Trick might not be everything he seems, and as Iris struggles to find where her loyalties lie, all of the prejudice, vulnerability, and anger that surrounds her collides in an unspeakable tragedy. Like love, and like sorrow, the blue summer sky is infinite in this coming-of-age story that is both breathtaking and heartbreaking.
The critically acclaimed author of The Home Place explores the heart and mystery of Big Sky Country in this evocative and atmospheric novel of family, home, love, and responsibility inspired by William Shakespeare’s Hamlet. The only son of a cattle rancher, Anthony Fry chafed against the expectation that he would take over the business that had belonged to his family for generations. While his ancestors planted deep roots in the unforgiving Montana soil, Anthony wanted nothing more than to leave Billings for the excitement, sophistication, and culture of city life. After college he fled to New York, hoping to turn his lifelong love of the theater into a career. But New York wasn’t the dream Anthony thought it would be. Now, with the unexpected death of his father, Anthony suddenly finds himself back in the place he swore he’d left behind. While the years have transformed the artistic dreamer, they’ve also changed Billings. His uncle Neal, always the black sheep of the Fry family, has become alarmingly close with Anthony’s mother, and a predatory mining company covets the Fry land. Anthony has always wanted out of Montana, away from his father’s suffocating expectations. Yet now that he may be freed from the burden of family legacy, he’s forced to ask himself what he truly finds important . . . answers that will ultimately decide his fate. In this unforgettable novel, Carrie La Seur once again captures the breathtaking beauty of the West and its people as she explores the power of family and the meaning of legacy—the burdens we inherit and those we place upon ourselves.
Bonding with the son from a family of gypsies who have set up an illegal camp in the paddock by her home, Iris, whose mother has recently abandoned their family, struggles with her introverted father's prejudices and her impulsive brother's troubled nature. A first novel.
In this courageous and insistently honest collection of poems, Vicki Mandell-King portrays the disparate feelings that arose during the four long years when her mother-in-law was dying: love, annoyance, exhaustion, regret, defiance, fear--even humor. SHRINKING INTO INFINITE SKY gives us all permission to feel those emotions we often think of as "bad"--emotions that, when worked through, can be transformed into moments of intimacy and grace.
A stunning, sad and darkly funny story about intense female friendship, from award-winning author, C. J. Flood. It all started with a poo in a flowerbed. Rosie and Titania are as close as sisters - closer, in fact. While Rosie is shy, red-faced and passive, Ti is big, tough and daring. They shouldn't be friends, but they are. Creeping out at night, the girls love to secretly wander through their coastal town, exploring empty streets and sharing their frustrations about school and their different, but equally difficult, families. But when Rosie betrays Ti, the two girls run in different directions - making decisions that could do irreparable damage to both of their lives. As Rosie confronts harsh truths, she must find a way back to Ti, and to herself. Whenever I heard the word kindred, I thought of me and Ti. ‘Flood has a talent for contemporary detail, voice and atmosphere’ The Sunday Times 'Emotionally powerful' Guardian ‘Brilliantly evocative…sharp and funny’ The Scotsman ? Praise for Infinite Sky: 'Extraordinarily powerful . . . brilliantly visual and full of feeling' Guardian 'Every character is drawn with sympathy, economy and assurance' Amanda Craig, The Times 'Loved by young adult journalists, CJ Flood's debut novel is also a burgeoning hit among adult readers' Stylist 'A beautiful, delicate debut' Nathan Filer, author of The Shock of the Fall 'Infinite Sky is terrific - moving, original and heartfelt. I loved it.' Terence Blacker 'A beautifully written, poignant account of first love, so full of delightfully recognisable moments, it will have grown-ups welling up too' Irish Times magazine 'Strong debut . . . one to watch' The Bookseller
A gargantuan, mind-altering comedy about the Pursuit of Happiness in America set in an addicts' halfway house and a tennis academy, and featuring the most endearingly screwed-up family to come along in recent fiction, Infinite Jest explores essential questions about what entertainment is and why it has come to so dominate our lives; about how our desire for entertainment affects our need to connect with other people; and about what the pleasures we choose say about who we are. Equal parts philosophical quest and screwball comedy, Infinite Jest bends every rule of fiction without sacrificing for a moment its own entertainment value. It is an exuberant, uniquely American exploration of the passions that make us human - and one of those rare books that renew the idea of what a novel can do.
When I looked up, I shivered. How many stars were in the sky? A million? A billion? Maybe the number was as big as infinity. I started to feel very, very small. How could I even think about something as big as infinity? Uma can't help feeling small when she peers up at the night sky. She begins to wonder about infinity. Is infinity a number that grows forever? Is it an endless racetrack? Could infinity be in an ice cream cone? Uma soon finds that the ways to think about this big idea may just be . . . infinite.
A young girl, still reeling from her dog's death, finds solace while picking up stones on the beach during her family's vacation.
Carrie La Seur makes her remarkable debut with The Home Place, a mesmerizing, emotionally evocative, and atmospheric literary novel in the vein of The House Girl and A Land More Kind Than Home, in which a successful lawyer is pulled back into her troubled family’s life in rural Montana in the wake of her sister’s death. The only Terrebonne who made it out, Alma thought she was done with Montana, with its bleak winters and stifling ways. But an unexpected call from the local police takes the successful lawyer back to her provincial hometown and pulls her into the family trouble she thought she’d left far behind: Her lying, party-loving sister, Vicky, is dead. Alma is told that a very drunk Vicky had wandered away from a party and died of exposure after a night in the brutal cold. But when Alma returns home to bury Vicky and see to her orphaned niece, she discovers that the death may not have been an accident. The Home Place is a story of secrets that will not lie still, human bonds that will not break, and crippling memories that will not be silenced. It is a story of rural towns and runaways, of tensions corporate and racial, of childhood trauma and adolescent betrayal, and of the guilt that even forgiveness cannot ease. Most of all, this is a story of the place we carry in us always: home.
Discusses the history and nature of mathematics, describes the origins of counting, and looks at the individuals who have made important mathematical discoveries
A NATIONAL BOOK FOUNDATION "5 UNDER 35" HONOREE WINNER OF THE 2017 KIRKUS PRIZE FINALIST FOR THE NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE LEONARD PRIZE SHORTLISTED FOR THE ASPEN WORDS LITERARY PRIZE FINALIST FOR THE NYPL'S YOUNG LION'S FICTION AWARD Named a Best Book of 2017 by NPR, Southern Living, Electric Literature, The Root, The Guardian, Bustle, Thrillist, and Publisher's Weekly A dazzlingly accomplished debut collection explores the ties that bind parents and children, husbands and wives, lovers and friends to one another and to the places they call home. In “Who Will Greet You at Home,” a National Magazine Award finalist for The New Yorker, A woman desperate for a child weaves one out of hair, with unsettling results. In “Wild,” a disastrous night out shifts a teenager and her Nigerian cousin onto uneasy common ground. In "The Future Looks Good," three generations of women are haunted by the ghosts of war, while in "Light," a father struggles to protect and empower the daughter he loves. And in the title story, in a world ravaged by flood and riven by class, experts have discovered how to "fix the equation of a person" - with rippling, unforeseen repercussions. Evocative, playful, subversive, and incredibly human, What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky heralds the arrival of a prodigious talent with a remarkable career ahead of her.
Navigating their burned-out, futuristic city home under constant threat from a pair of dragons circling the skies, three young people are forced to flee and confront challenges ranging from fire and conspiracies to taboo drugs and dragon-worshippers.
People often lean towards either trusting their gut or being completely rational, but Ellen Tadd urges readers to consider a new approach that integrates soul, spirit, and personality. She guides readers in developing their own intuitive powers. According to Tadd, Spirit is the God Force that animates and empowers us and suffuses everyone and everything. But while Spirit is conscious and communicative, we haven't been taught to look for it. In fact, most of us have been conditioned not to look for it. When we choose spiritual attunement, we find ourselves able to engage more clearly and openly with life-even with its challenges, such as illness, death, loss, and feelings of anxiety, loneliness, fear, or inadequacy. The Infitinite Viewoffers the tools and insights needed to achieve attunement. Drawing on her personal narrative, as well as the experiences of her students, Tadd helps readers transform their understanding of themselves and the world around them.
A lighthearted coming-of-age debut echoing novels like Karen Russell’s Swamplandia! and Carol Rifka Brunt’s Tell the Wolves I’m Home. A.Z. McKinney is on the shores of greatness. Now all she needs is a boat. When the Sea of Santiago appears overnight in a cow pasture in Arkansas, it seems, to some, a religious miracle. But to high school sophomore A.Z. McKinney, it marks her chance to make history—as its first oceanographer. All she needs is to get out on the water. And when a cute, conceptual artist named Kristoff moves to town, A.Z. realizes she may have found a first mate. Together, they make a plan to build a boat and study the Sea in secret. But from fighting with her best friend to searching for a tourist-terrorizing alligator (that may or may not be a crocodile), distractions are everywhere . . . With her self-determined oceanic destiny on the line, A.Z. finds herself at odds with everything she thought she knew about life, love, and the sea. To get what she wants, she’ll have to decide whether to sink or float . . . But which one comes first? “Beautifully written, equal parts hilarious and poignant, this insightful, and stunningly imaginative, novel is a miracle in itself.” —Skip Horack, author of The Other Joseph, The Eden Hunter, and The Southern Cross “Teague’s debut novel masterfully chronicles the friction, contradictions, and emotional tsunamis of being an intelligent 14-year-old girl.” —Booklist, starred review
What makes a place? Rebecca Solnit reinvents the traditional atlas, searching for layers of meaning & connections of experience across San Francisco.
The bestselling, Man Booker Prize-winning novel hailed as "a true achievement. Catton has built a lively parody of a 19th-century novel, and in so doing created a novel for the 21st, something utterly new. The pages fly."--New York Times Book Review It is 1866, and Walter Moody has come to stake his claim in New Zealand's booming gold rush. On the stormy night of his arrival, he stumbles across a tense gathering of 12 local men who have met in secret to discuss a series of unexplained events: a wealthy man has vanished, a prostitute has tried to end her life, and an enormous cache of gold has been discovered in the home of a luckless drunk. Moody is soon drawn into a network of fates and fortunes that is as complex and exquisitely ornate as the night sky. Richly evoking a mid-nineteenth-century world of shipping, banking, and gold rush boom and bust, THE LUMINARIES is at once a fiendishly clever ghost story, a gripping page-turner, and a thrilling novelistic achievement. It richly confirms that Eleanor Catton is one of the brightest stars in the international literary firmament.
In this high-flying, adrenaline-fueled thriller, America's best hope is the elite teen fighter pilots of the United Star Academy. "BREAKING SKY is an action-packed thrill ride that smashes through all kinds of barriers at a Mach 5 pace." —Carrie Jones, New York Times bestselling author of the Need series Fly to the last drop of fuel. Fight to the last drop of blood. Showoff. Reckless. Maverick. Chase Harcourt, call sign "Nyx", isn't one to play it safe. In the year 2048, America is locked in a cold war and the country's best hope is the elite teen fighter pilots of the United Star Academy. Chase is one of only two daredevil pilots chosen to fly an experimental "Streaker" jet. But few know the pain and loneliness of her past. All anyone cares about is that Chase aces the upcoming Streaker trials, proving the prototype jet can knock the enemy out of the sky. But as the world tilts toward war, Chase cracks open a military secret. There's a third Streaker, whose young hotshot pilot, Tristan, can match her on the ground and in the clouds. And Chase doesn't play well with others. But to save her country, she may just have to put her life in the hands of the competition. Cori McCarthy's taut, romantic, action adventure will shoot your pulse straight into overdrive with her brilliantly imagined and frighteningly possible future. BREAKING SKY has also been optioned for film by Sony Pictures. "Strong characterizations, action, adventure, and emotion combine to produce a sci-fi novel that is more than just the sum of its parts." -School Library Journal STARRED Review "Smart, exciting, confident-and quite possibly the next Big Thing." -Kirkus Reviews "McCarthy deploys breath-stopping depictions of high-stakes piloting with enviable ease, and the in-your-face personal confrontations are nearly as taut." -Publishers Weekly
In Infinity and the Mind, Rudy Rucker leads an excursion to that stretch of the universe he calls the "Mindscape," where he explores infinity in all its forms: potential and actual, mathematical and physical, theological and mundane. Rucker acquaints us with Gödel's rotating universe, in which it is theoretically possible to travel into the past, and explains an interpretation of quantum mechanics in which billions of parallel worlds are produced every microsecond. It is in the realm of infinity, he maintains, that mathematics, science, and logic merge with the fantastic. By closely examining the paradoxes that arise from this merging, we can learn a great deal about the human mind, its powers, and its limitations. Using cartoons, puzzles, and quotations to enliven his text, Rucker guides us through such topics as the paradoxes of set theory, the possibilities of physical infinities, and the results of Gödel's incompleteness theorems. His personal encounters with Gödel the mathematician and philosopher provide a rare glimpse at genius and reveal what very few mathematicians have dared to admit: the transcendent implications of Platonic realism.
Sakae Sugiura working hard to become a teacher, gets an assistant teacher position at an elementary school. There he meets his old elementary school homeroom teacher, Ryuji Fukada. Fukada-Sensei was someone Sakae looked up to, someone who supported him. Now, Sakae is shocked by how different Fukada is and feels lost. But since he’s no longer a student, will his feelings towards Fukada change...?
The Presence of the Infinite sheds new light on the important subject of spiritual experience. Using the emerging insights of evolutionary spirituality, integral philosopher Steve McIntosh enlarges readers’ capacity to have spiritual experience more abundantly and use it more effectively to improve their lives and the world around them. The Presence of the Infinite starts by providing a timely cultural analysis and critique of the various forms of spirituality that are vying for influence in contemporary American society. Building on this context, McIntosh shows how evolutionary spirituality overcomes the limitations of religious, secular, and New Age spirituality by better harmonizing science and spirit. Evolutionary spirituality’s transcendent potential is found in its deepening realization of the essentially spiritual qualities of beauty, truth, and goodness. McIntosh then uses evolutionary spirituality’s enlarged understanding of what spiritual experience is and how it works to consider the question of ultimate reality. This leads to an examination of conflicting ideas that regard spirit as either formless and nondual, or as loving and creative. By working to harmonize and integrate these alternative conceptions of ultimate reality, McIntosh shows how evolutionary spirituality can achieve a synthesis of nondual and theistic teachings of truth that can produce a spiritual renaissance in America and beyond. The Presence of the Infinite is destined to become a definitive text in the exciting new field of evolutionary spirituality.

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