Information literacy is generally defined as the ability to recognize situations in which information is needed and to find, evaluate, and effectively use relevant information from a variety of media. It is an essential skill set in all academic disciplines at all levels of education and also in professional and personal life. The recent dramatic changes in the technologies of creating, storing, and retrieving content have made information at once more accessible but also more difficult to critically evaluate, and universities have increasingly come to recognize that effective instruction in information literacy is essential to incoming students' success in their academic careers and beyond. With that goal in mind, Matt Upson, C. Michael Hall, and Kevin Cannon have created a unique guide in graphic-novel format that instructs undergraduate students in the fundamental research skills that constitute information literacy that is both academically sound and wildly imaginative and engaging. Following the Association of College and University Libraries Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education, the guide stresses skills such as determining the extent of information needed for a research project, accessing the needed information effectively and efficiently, evaluating information and sources critically, incorporating selected information into one's knowledge base, using information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose, and understanding the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information. Each of the eight chapters ends with exercises that allow students to apply their knowledge to relevant scenarios, and the manuscript concludes with a glossary of critical terms.
Every day researchers face an onslaught of irrelevant, inaccurate, and sometimes insidious information. While new technologies provide powerful tools for accessing knowledge, not all information is created equal. Valuable information may be tucked away on a shelf, buried on the hundredth page of search results, or hidden behind digital barriers. With so many obstacles to effective research, it is vital that higher education students master the art of inquiry. Information Now is an innovative approach to information literacy that will reinvent the way college students think about research. Instead of the typical textbook format, it uses illustrations, humor, and reflective exercises to teach students how to become savvy researchers. Students will learn how to evaluate information, to incorporate it into their existing knowledge base, to wield it effectively, and to understand the ethical issues surrounding its use. Written by two library professionals, it incorporates concepts and skills drawn from the Association of College and Research Libraries’ Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education and their Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Thoroughly researched and highly engaging, Information Now offers the tools that students need to become powerful consumers and creators of information. Whether used by a high school student tackling a big paper, an undergrad facing the newness of a university library, or a writer wanting to go beyond Google, Information Now is a powerful tool for any researcher’s arsenal.
This text shows that research is important beyond the classroom and is a necessary component in any career. Beginning with coverage of skills and techniques, this comprehensive text then moves into specific kinds of academic research tasks, showing the generic features and constraints of academic writing. The main issues necessary for understanding how to read and construct research projects are discussed, including plagiarism, copyright and patents, conventions used by different discourse communities, and how writers use sources in different ways.
Information Science 101 helps high school and college freshman identify and understand careers in information science. With this text, author Anthony Debons, one of the early founders of the discipline of Information Science, gives attention to the role of various disciplines in the field: library/documentation, tele-transmission, computer science and practice, decision making/problem solving, knowledge organization, and management.
Technology makes things faster, and simpler. At the same time, with all the technology that surrounds us on a daily basis, everyone is awash in too much information. Our computers, phones, tablets, work projects, tax and other files, and various online accounts all store data. It’s a lot! Can anything be done? Yes! 'Declutter Your Data' is for anyone who is interested in making better use of technology, cleaning up their digital clutter, and coming up with an organized and efficient way to access their data going forward. This book guides readers step by step through the process of figuring out what data is important to them; wrestling with the information to clear out what’s not useful and organize what they want to keep; and dealing with the ongoing data maintenance aspect that is a necessity in this digital age. Following author Angela Crocker’s advice and putting these ideas into practice will reduce your digital clutter, make you more efficient, help you save time, and give you a happier relationship with your information, clearing your mind for more important things.
Showing the important connection between education and literacy, this collection of writing assignments and readings encourage readers to think about their experiences in college. Reading and Writing the College Experience offers a flexible, yet structured set of unique scaffolded writing assignments that will help students develop writing strategies. Each assignment contains a list of readings included in the book to be used in conjunction with the writing assignment. The result is that students have a greater understanding of the connection between education and literacy.
Can machines really think? Is the mind just a complicated computer program? This book focuses on the major issues behind one of the hardest scientific problems ever undertaken, from Alan Turing's influential groundwork to cutting-edge robotics and the new AI.
This book provides a ‘no-nonsense’ guide to project management which will enable library and information professionals to lead or take part in a wide range of projects from large-scale multi-organization complex projects through to relatively simple local ones. Barbara Allan has fully revised and updated her classic 2004 title, Project Management, to incorporate considerable developments during the past decade, including: the development and wide-scale acceptance of formal project management methodologies; the use of social media to communicate and disseminate information about projects and the large shift in the types of project library and information workers may be involved in. The text is supported by practical case studies drawn from a wide range of LIS organizations at local, regional, national and international levels. These examples provide an insight into good practice for the practitioner, from an individual working in a voluntary organization on an extremely limited budget, to someone involved in an international project. Content covered includes: an introduction to project management, project workers and the library and information professiondifferent approaches to project management, the project cycle, the people side of projects and management of changediscussion of project methodologies, project management software, open source software, collaborative working software and use of social mediaproject initiation, communication, analysis and project briefsdeveloping project infra-structure, scheduling, working out the finances and carrying out a detailed risk analysisworking in partnerships, in diverse and virtual teams, and managing change. If you are an LIS professional involved in project work of any kind, whether on a managerial, practical, academic or research level, this is an invaluable resource for you.
Introduces the history and science of genetics through the story of an alien scientist researching humans to find a cure for an alien disease.
The new ACRL information literacy concepts brings renewed interest in information literacy instruction and skills for librarians. The New Information Literacy Instruction: Best Practices offers guidance in planning for and implementing information literacy instruction programs in a wide range of instructional situations. As librarians take a new look at information literacy instruction, this essential book will help guide you in creating and maintaining a quality instruction program.
With advice for finding, evaluating, and documenting sources, this handy spiral-bound pocket guide covers the essential information college students need for research assignments in more than 30 disciplines. New, up-to-date documentation models guide students as they cite common sources and newer sources in the current editions of one of four documentation styles (MLA, APA, Chicago, and CSE). Advice, examples, and activities help students engage in the research process, find entry points in debates, and develop their authority as researchers. The many examples, according to one college librarian, "are realistic and relevant." Research and Documentation in the Digital Age is the perfect companion to any college textbook.
This comics-style collaboration between rhetoricians Elizabeth Losh and Jonathan Alexander and illustrator team Big Time Attic presents the content of the composition course in a form designed to draw students in. Understanding Rhetoric: A Graphic Guide to Writing covers what first-year college writers need to know — the writing process, critical analysis, argument, research, revision, and presentation — in a visual format that brings rhetorical concepts to life through examples ranging from Aristotle to YouTube.
This is an accessible, one-stop guide to the why, what, and how of contemporary fact-checking. Brooke Borel, an experienced fact-checker, draws on the expertise of more than 200 writers, editors, and fellow checkers representing the New Yorker, Popular Science, This American Life, Vogue, and many other outlets. She covers best practices for fact-checking in a variety of media - from magazine articles, both print and online, to books and documentaries - and from the perspective of both in-house and freelance checkers. She also offers advice on navigating relationships with writers, editors, and sources; considers the realities of fact-checking on a budget and checking one's own work; and reflects on the place of fact-checking in today's media landscape
Introduction to Information Literacy for Students presents a concise, practical guide to navigating information in the digital age. Features a unique step-by-step method that can be applied to any research project Includes research insights from professionals, along with review exercises, insiders' tips and tools, search screen images utilized by students, and more Encourages active inquiry-based learning through the inclusion of various study questions and exercises Provides students with effective research strategies to serve them through their academic years and professional careers Ensures accessibility and a strong instructional approach due to authorship by a librarian and award-winning English professor
"Undergraduate research is often conflated with standard end-of-semester research papers, featuring APA style bibliographies and a certain number of sources. But in fact, undergraduate research is one of several high-impact educational practices identified by George Kuh and the Association of American Colleges & Universities, and is increasingly seen as a vital part of the undergraduate experience. Research helps students connect the dots between their interests, general education courses, writing requirements, and major coursework, and increases learning, retention, enrollment in graduate education, and engagement in future work. In 25 chapters featuring 60 expert contributors, Undergraduate Research and the Academic Librarian examines how the structures that undergird undergraduate research, such as the library, can become part of the core infrastructure of the undergraduate experience. It explores the strategic new services and cross-departmental collaborations academic libraries are creating to support research: publishing services, such as institutional repositories and undergraduate research journals; data services; copyright services; poster printing and design; specialized space; digital scholarship services; awards; and much more. These programs can be from any discipline, can be interdisciplinary, can be any high-impact format, and can reflect upon an institution's own history, traditions, and tensions. As higher education becomes more competitive--for dollars, for students, for grant money, for resources in general--institutions will need to increase their development of programs that provide the experiential and deep learning, and increased engagement, that research provides. The scholarly and extracurricular experiences of college are increasingly becoming a major part of marketing college education. Beyond the one-shot, beyond course-integrated instruction, Undergraduate Research and the Academic Librarian is a detailed guide to how librarians can help students go beyond a foundation of information literacy toward advanced research and information management skills"--provided by publisher.
Finding Reliable Information Online: Adventures of an Information Sleuth uses stories or “information adventures” to illustrate the best approaches to searching for information and to help us develop our aptitude for locating high quality resources in a rapidly changing digital environment that is becoming proficient at monopolizing our attention with useless or unreliable information. This book is about taking charge of the search process and not handing over the reins to search engines like Google, Bing, or Yahoo to dictate what information we consume.
The World Factbook provides information on the history, people, government, economy, geography, communications, transportation, military, and transnational issues for 267 world entities. The World Factbook is prepared by the Central Intelligence Agency. Comprehensive guide full of facts, maps, flags, and detailed information. A must for travellers, businessmen, politicians, and all who wants to know more about our fascinating world. -- We share these facts with the people of all nations in the belief that knowledge of the truth underpins the functioning of free societies (From official webpage). Tags: world, guide, facts, almanach
What are "essential questions," and how do they differ from other kinds of questions? What's so great about them? Why should you design and use essential questions in your classroom? Essential questions (EQs) help target standards as you organize curriculum content into coherent units that yield focused and thoughtful learning. In the classroom, EQs are used to stimulate students' discussions and promote a deeper understanding of the content. Whether you are an Understanding by Design (UbD) devotee or are searching for ways to address standards--local or Common Core State Standards--in an engaging way, Jay McTighe and Grant Wiggins provide practical guidance on how to design, initiate, and embed inquiry-based teaching and learning in your classroom. Offering dozens of examples, the authors explore the usefulness of EQs in all K-12 content areas, including skill-based areas such as math, PE, language instruction, and arts education. As an important element of their backward design approach to designing curriculum, instruction, and assessment, the authors *Give a comprehensive explanation of why EQs are so important; *Explore seven defining characteristics of EQs; *Distinguish between topical and overarching questions and their uses; *Outline the rationale for using EQs as the focal point in creating units of study; and *Show how to create effective EQs, working from sources including standards, desired understandings, and student misconceptions. Using essential questions can be challenging--for both teachers and students--and this book provides guidance through practical and proven processes, as well as suggested "response strategies" to encourage student engagement. Finally, you will learn how to create a culture of inquiry so that all members of the educational community--students, teachers, and administrators--benefit from the increased rigor and deepened understanding that emerge when essential questions become a guiding force for learners of all ages.

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