An excellent text for clients to read before meeting with attorneys so they'll understand the fundamentals of patent, copyright, trade secret, trademark, mask work, and unfair competition laws. This is not a "do-it-yourself" manual but rather a ready reference tool for inventors or creators that will generate maximum efficiencies in obtaining, preserving and enforcing their intellectual property rights. It explains why they need to secure the services of IPR attorneys. Coverage includes employment contracts, including the ability of engineers to take confidential and secret knowledge to a new job, shop rights and information to help an entrepreneur establish a non-conflicting enterprise when leaving their prior employment. Sample forms of contracts, contract clauses, and points to consider before signing employment agreements are included. Coverage of copyright, software protection, and the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) as well as the procedural variances in international intellectual property laws and procedures.
Bently & Sherman's Intellectual Property Law is the definitive textbook on the subject. The authors' all-embracing approach not only clearly sets out the law in relation to copyright, patents, trade marks, passing off, and confidentiality, but also takes account of a wide range of academic opinion enabling readers to explore and make informed judgements about key principles. The particularly clear and lively writing style ensures that even the most complex areas are lucid and comprehensible.
In 2009, the Association for the Advancement of Teaching and Research in Intellectual Property (ATRIP) dedicated its yearly congress to the theme Horizontal Issues in IP Law; Uncovering the Matrix. That theme and the main concern of the so-called Intellectual Property of Transition Project have been brought together by the editors of the current book under the intriguing title The Structure of Intellectual Property Law Questioned, is whether the apparent compartmentalisation and fragmentation of actual intellectual property law can be based upon a coherent system that supports the entire field. In other words: it is questioned whether one organising principle which underlies the different parts of this domain of law can be found. Not surprisingly, the answers given by the various experts that contribute to this book tend to differ, mainly depending on their field of interest: copyright law, patent law, trademark law, the main tendency being in favour of tailoring instead of unifying both from the perspective of efficiency and that of economics. However, even more interesting than the answers to the question posed, are the stimulating and thought-provoking analyses which the book offers. This is really a book one should read if one is interested in the conjunction of the basic principles of intellectual property law and how they work out in practice. Willem Grosheide, Utrecht University, The Netherlands Today, intellectual property is a broad genus embracing various more specific species - invention patents, copyright, trade marks and so forth. Anyone concerned with how this ever-expanding grouping is developing should read the fourteen essays in this book. Written by leading scholars, they tackle not only the relationships between the species, but also those between sub-species. Originally presented as papers to the Association for Teaching and Research in IP, the writing is both subtle and full of verve. Strongly recommended. William Cornish, Cambridge University, UK This well-researched and highly topical book analyses whether the ever-increasing degree of sophistication in intellectual property law necessarily leads to fragmentation and inconsistency, or whether the common principles informing the system are sustainable enough to offer a solid and resilient framework for legal development.
'This clearly-written and comprehensive text, by two leading scholars of European intellectual property law, is extremely adaptable. It is a perfect platform for classroom teaching, and is also a fine resource for those researching in what is becoming an increasingly complex field.' – Graeme B. Dinwoodie, University of Oxford, UK 'This hybrid volume, part commentary, part primary sources, with questions to stimulate further thinking, serves both as a teaching tool and as a manual for lawyers who seek a comprehensive overview of EU intellectual property law. The book aims at a generalist legal audience, with very a helpful précis of international law, including the major multilateral treaties, as well as a summary of the EU legal framework that non-Europeans will find highly useful. The authors explore the full range of traditional and emerging IP rights. They also provide in-depth analysis of remedies and of the international private law issues that increasingly arise in contemporary complex IP litigation.' – Jane Ginsburg, Columbia Law School, US The first of its kind, this textbook has been carefully designed to give students and non-specialist practitioners a clear understanding of the fundamentals of European intellectual property law. Providing a comprehensive overview of both community IP rights, and areas of IP law that have been harmonised, and supported by judicious use of extracts from the most significant source material, the book assists the reader in navigating through the increasingly complex European IP system. European Intellectual Property Law deals with European patent, trade mark and copyright law copyright, as well as with adjacent areas such as protection of plant varieties, geographical indications, industrial design, competition law, enforcement, and private international law, with a focus on the most relevant case law to be found in those areas. Key Features: • Written by two of the leading authorities in European IP law • Concise and readable style • Extracts from key source material • Questions designed to stimulate thinking around legal problems • Coverage of related areas adjacent to IP • Offers an overview on international IP protection and the interrelation between European law and IP law in general. This detailed book is designed for all courses on European intellectual property, whether basic or advanced, as well as for practitioners looking for a comprehensive and concise overview on the structure and content of European IP law.
This book takes a fresh look at the most dynamic area of American law today, comprising the fields of copyright, patent, trademark, trade secrecy, publicity rights, and misappropriation. Topics range from copyright in private letters to defensive patenting of business methods, from moral rights in the visual arts to the banking of trademarks, from the impact of the court of patent appeals to the management of Mickey Mouse. The history and political science of intellectual property law, the challenge of digitization, the many statutes and judge-made doctrines, and the interplay with antitrust principles are all examined. The treatment is both positive (oriented toward understanding the law as it is) and normative (oriented to the reform of the law). Previous analyses have tended to overlook the paradox that expanding intellectual property rights can effectively reduce the amount of new intellectual property by raising the creators' input costs. Those analyses have also failed to integrate the fields of intellectual property law. They have failed as well to integrate intellectual property law with the law of physical property, overlooking the many economic and legal-doctrinal parallels. This book demonstrates the fundamental economic rationality of intellectual property law, but is sympathetic to critics who believe that in recent decades Congress and the courts have gone too far in the creation and protection of intellectual property rights. Table of Contents: Introduction 1. The Economic Theory of Property 2. How to Think about Copyright 3. A Formal Model of Copyright 4. Basic Copyright Doctrines 5. Copyright in Unpublished Works 6. Fair Use, Parody, and Burlesque 7. The Economics of Trademark Law 8. The Optimal Duration of Copyrights and Trademarks 9. The Legal Protection of Postmodern Art 10. Moral Rights and the Visual Artists Rights Act 11. The Economics of Patent Law 12. The Patent Court: A Statistical Evaluation 13. The Economics of Trade Secrecy Law 14. Antitrust and Intellectual Property 15. The Political Economy of Intellectual Property Law Conclusion Acknowledgments Index Reviews of this book: Chicago law professor William Landes and his polymath colleague Richard Posner have produced a fascinating new book...[The Economic Structure of Intellectual Property Law] is a broad-ranging analysis of how intellectual property should and does work...Shakespeare's copying from Plutarch, Microsoft's incentives to hide the source code for Windows, and Andy Warhol's right to copyright a Brillo pad box as art are all analyzed, as is the question of the status of the all-bran cereal called 'All-Bran.' --Nicholas Thompson, New York Sun Reviews of this book: Landes and Posner, each widely respected in the intersection of law and economics, investigate the right mix of protection and use of intellectual property (IP)...This volume provides a broad and coherent approach to the economics and law of IP. The economics is important, understandable, and valuable. --R. A. Miller, Choice Intellectual property is the most important public policy issue that most policymakers don't yet get. It is America's most important export, and affects an increasingly wide range of social and economic life. In this extraordinary work, two of America's leading scholars in the law and economics movement test the pretensions of intellectual property law against the rationality of economics. Their conclusions will surprise advocates from both sides of this increasingly contentious debate. Their analysis will help move the debate beyond the simplistic ideas that now tend to dominate. --Lawrence Lessig, Stanford Law School, author of The Future of Ideas: The Fate of the Commons in a Connected World An image from modern mythology depicts the day that Einstein, pondering a blackboard covered with sophisticated calculations, came to the life-defining discovery: Time = $$. Landes and Posner, in the role of that mythological Einstein, reveal at every turn how perceptions of economic efficiency pervade legal doctrine. This is a fascinating and resourceful book. Every page reveals fresh, provocative, and surprising insights into the forces that shape law. --Pierre N. Leval, Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals, Second Circuit The most important book ever written on intellectual property. --William Patry, former copyright counsel to the U.S. House of Representatives, Judiciary Committee Given the immense and growing importance of intellectual property to modern economies, this book should be welcomed, even devoured, by readers who want to understand how the legal system affects the development, protection, use, and profitability of this peculiar form of property. The book is the first to view the whole landscape of the law of intellectual property from a functionalist (economic) perspective. Its examination of the principles and doctrines of patent law, copyright law, trade secret law, and trademark law is unique in scope, highly accessible, and altogether greatly rewarding. --Steven Shavell, Harvard Law School, author of Foundations of Economic Analysis of Law
As companies and organisations increasingly operate across national boundaries, so the incentive to understand how to acquire, deploy and protect IP rights in multiple national jurisdictions has rapidly increased. Transnational Intellectual Property Law meets the need for a book that introduces contemporary intellectual property as it is practiced in today’s global context. Focusing on three major IP regimes – the United States, Europe and China – the unique transnational approach of this textbook will help law students and lawyers across the world understand not only how IP operates in different national contexts, but also how to coordinate IP protection across numerous national jurisdictions. International IP treaties are also covered, but in the context of an overall emphasis on transnational coordination of legal rights and strategies.
Intellectual property law's influence extends to every aspect of human life. The markings on a can of Coca-cola, the rights in the books, music, pictures, drama, films and electronic information sources we all use, even the shape of our pen, architecture and the science behind the latest attempt on space exploration all form its subject matter. This popular text explains and examines the often complicated law which protects and preserves new ideas and outlines how intellectual property rights allow right owners to stop others taking their creations. The changes in the new edition reflect this rapidly expanding field. This textbook includes: amendments to major decisions from the House of Lords and the European Court of Justice recent legislation such as the Patents Act 2004 the effect of developments in information technology on copyright and patent principles recent case law including Kirin-Amgen Inc v Hoechst Marion Roussel Ltdand British Horseracing Board Ltd v William Hill Organization the impact of UK, EC and EU competition laws on intellectual property rights a new chapter devoted to protection for image new coverage relating to domain names an examination of the increasing attention to human rights in intellectual property law. This thoughtful and thought-provoking text is essential reading for any student of intellectual property law. With further reading at the end of each chapter, it is the ideal introduction to a thorough understanding of intellectual property law.
This book sets out to expose, analyse and evaluate the conflicting conceptions of legal judgment that operate in intellectual property law. Its central theme is the opposition between law-making by way of the creation of generally applicable rules and law-making done at the point of application through case-by- case decisions tailored to the particulars of individual circumstances. Through an exploration of form, the analysis sets out to provide insights into how intellectual property law achieves a balance between various competing interests.
This book combines extracts from major cases and secondary materials with critical commentary to provide a complete resource for undergraduate and postgraduate students of intellectual property law. All areas of intellectual property law in the UK are covered: copyright, trademarks and passing off, confidential information, industrial designs, patent, procedure and enforcement. This book also tackles topical areas, such as the application of intellectual property law to new technologies and character merchandising. While the focus of the book is on intellectual property law in a domestic context, it provides international, EU and comparative law perspectives on major issues. It also addresses the wider policy implications of legislative and judicial developments in the area.
First published in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
This is one in a series of country reports on the intellectual property systems of Asia. The authors and editors note the difficulty of obtaining authentic source material, but nevertheless provide as comprehensive a view of China's intellectual property protection as possible.
This fully updated book offers a compact and accessible account of EU intellectual property (IP) law and policy. The digital age brings many opportunities, but also presents continuing challenges to IP law as the EU’s programme of harmonisation unfolds. As well as addressing the main IP rights (copyright, patents, designs, trade marks and related rights), the book also considers IP’s relationship with the EU’s rules on free movement of goods and competition, as well as examining the enforcement of IP rights. Taking account of numerous changes, this timely second edition covers the substantive provisions and procedures which apply throughout the EU, making extensive reference to the case law. The author considers how the exploitation of IP is increasingly global; harmonisation, in contrast, is only partial, even at the EU level. In response, the book sets EU IP law in its wider international context. It also seeks to highlight policy issues and arguments of relevance to the EU, in its relations both within the Union and with the rest of the world. Designed as a compact and approachable account of these difficult and technical areas, and with advice on further reading and research, this unique book is useful both as a work of reference and for more general study. It is essential reading for postgraduate students, academic researchers and legal practitioners alike.
Updated to include recent important developments in Australian intellectual property law, this is an essential text for students and professionals.
Written in the context of China's new intellectual property laws after WTO entry, this unique law-and-commentary guide examines the legal framework for intellectual property protection and its practical implications in the commercial world. Written for multinationals with operations in China, the book addresses the commercial realities of protecting and managing intellectual property and the practical application of Chinese intellectual property laws to business, e.g., assessing risk liabilities for all parties in the supply chain, from manufacturers to retailers, to marketing firms and importers. Among the overarching topics treated are the following: Trademarks Copyright Patents Enforcement of intellectual property rights Trade secrets Internet Technology transfer Unfair competition With key legislation, cases, and judicial interpretations and cases, China Intellectual Property Law Guide has no peers as a working reference for corporate counsel and the busy IP lawyer alike. This title forms part of the Asia Business Law Series. The Asia Business Law Series is published in cooperation with CCH Asia and provides updated and reliable practical guidelines, legislation and case law, in order to help practitioners, policy makers and scholars understand how business is conducted in the rapidly growing Asian market. This book was originally published by CCH Asia as the loose-leaf China IP Law Guide
This book addresses two crucial concerns of intellectual property owners--how to recover monetary compensation when an infringement has occurred and how to prevent further infringement.
Intellectual property law in the United States does not work well and it needs to be reformed—but not for the reasons given by most critics. The issue is not that intellectual property rights are too easily obtained, too broad in scope, and too long in duration. Rather, the primary problem is overreaching by publishers, producers, artists, and others who abuse intellectual property law by claiming stronger rights than the law actually gives them. From copyfraud—like phony copyright notices attached to the U.S. Constitution—to lawsuits designed to prevent people from poking fun at Barbie, from controversies over digital sampling in hip-hop to Major League Baseball's ubiquitous restriction on sharing any "accounts and descriptions of this game," overreaching claims of intellectual property rights are everywhere. Overreaching interferes with legitimate uses and reproduction of a wide variety of works, imposes enormous social and economic costs, and ultimately undermines creative endeavors. As this book reveals, the solution is not to change the scope or content of intellectual property rights, but to create mechanisms to prevent people asserting rights beyond those they legitimately possess. While there are many other books on intellectual property, this is the first to examine overreaching as a distinct problem and to show how to solve it. Jason Mazzone makes a series of timely proposals by which government, organizations, and ordinary people can stand up to creators and content providers when they seek to grab more than the law gives them.
Accurate and accessible, Concentrate law study and revision guides enable you to take exams with confidence. Including revision tips and advice for extra marks, alongside a thorough breakdown of the key topics and cases, this guide will help you to get the most out of your revision and to maximise your performance in exams.
This book discusses the TRIPs Agreement, the Madrid Protocol and other international conventions, and compares the basic principles of U.S.
This book explores and discusses how to obtain traditional intellectual property law rights in the non-traditional settings of video game and virtual world environments, and serves as a primer for researching these emerging legal issues. Each chapter addresses: end user license agreements; copyrights, patents, trademarks; and trade secrets, as addressed by U.S. law. It also covers international legal issues stemming from the multi-national user-base and foreign operation of many virtual worlds.

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