Interventions in Education Systems draws on research conducted in England, Mexico, Singapore and Finland to illuminate reform processes to education systems in a range of contexts, to develop a better understanding of intervention processes and to promote the development of more sophisticated models for reforming education systems. The authors compare policy implementations and interventions in countries with different socio-economic profiles and different levels of development, highlighting how these processes in practice all too frequently are side-tracked and distorted, often unintentionall.
Interventions in Education Systems draws on research conducted in England, Mexico, Singapore and Finland to illuminate reform processes to education systems in a range of contexts, to develop a better understanding of intervention processes and to promote the development of more sophisticated models for reforming education systems. The authors compare policy implementations and interventions in countries with different socio-economic profiles and different levels of development, highlighting how these processes in practice all too frequently are side-tracked and distorted, often unintentionally, by political, economic and social forces.
Why aren't more schools seeing significant improvement in students' reading ability when they implement Response to Intervention (RTI) or Multitiered Systems of Support (MTSS) in their literacy programs? These frameworks serve as a way for educators to identify struggling readers and provide the small-group instruction they need to improve their skills. But the success stories are too few in number, and most schools have too little to show for their efforts. What accounts for the difference? What are successful schools doing that sets them apart? Author and education consultant Susan Hall provides answers in the form of 10 success factors for implementing MTSS. Based on her experience in schools across the United States, she explains the "whys" and "hows" of * Grouping by skill deficit and using diagnostic assessments to get helpful data for grouping and regrouping. * Implementing an instructional delivery model, including the "walk-to-intervention" model. * Using intervention time wisely and being aware of what makes intervention effective. * Providing teachers with the materials they need for effective lessons and delivering differentiated professional development for administrators, reading coaches, teachers, and instructional assistants. * Monitoring progress regularly and conducting nonevaluative observations of intervention instruction. Practical, comprehensive, and evidence-based, 10 Success Factors for Literacy Intervention provides the guidance educators need to move from disappointing results to solid gains in students' literacy achievement.
Many schools have implemented academic response to intervention (RTI) and schoolwide positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS) as separate initiatives. This book provides keys to making these programs more effective, seamless, efficient, and sustainable by combining them into a single multi-tiered system of support (MTSS). Steps and strategies are outlined for integrating data structures, practices, teams, and district systems. Contributing authors present detailed case examples of successful MTSS implementation in three states. In a large-size format with lay-flat binding, the book features 27 reproducible checklists and evaluation tools. Purchasers get access to a companion website where they can download and print the reproducible materials plus other helpful resources. This book is in The Guilford Practical Intervention in the Schools Series, edited by T. Chris Riley-Tillman.
Response to Intervention (RtI) is at the heart of evidence-based practice in schools. Though written into federal special education legislation, it is a general education process consisting of a three-tiered framework for organizing a comprehensive and differentiated system designed to ensure educational success for all students. The focus in this book is on meeting the social, emotional, and behavioral needs of students. School social workers are key stakeholders who need to be skilled in designing, monitoring, and evaluating the effectiveness of school-wide universal supports, targeted group interventions, and intensive individual interventions in objective and measurable terms. Designed as both a training manual and a practical reference, with contributions by seasoned academics and practitioners with extensive experience developing and practicing in RtI systems, this one-of-a-kind guide operationalizes this crucial service delivery framework. It highlights the importance of data-based decision making and offers concrete guidelines for collecting, analyzing, and displaying data. Detailed case examples that illustrate real-world program implementation, practical guidance in selecting empirically supported practices, sample assessment worksheets, and strategies for supporting the adoption and sustainability of RtI systems make this a handy tool for school social workers seeking a more active role in using decision-making processes to improve their school's system of support for all students.
Education in Mexico, Central America and the Latin Caribbean examines the development and practice of education in México, Costa Rica, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panamá. The chapters, written by local experts, provide an overview of the structure, aims and purposes of education in each of these ten countries with very different socio-economic backgrounds. The authors present curriculum standards, pedagogy, evaluation, accountability and delivery, discussing both how the formal systems are structured and how they actually function. The volume explores the origins of proposed reforms and their implementation, emphasising the distinctiveness of each country and attempting to locate new practices that could lead to better education. Including a comparative introduction to the issues facing education in the region as a whole and guides to available online datasets, this book is an essential reference for researchers, scholars, international agencies and policy-makers.
Americans have long recognized that investments in public education contribute to the common good, enhancing national prosperity and supporting stable families, neighborhoods, and communities. Education is even more critical today, in the face of economic, environmental, and social challenges. Today's children can meet future challenges if their schooling and informal learning activities prepare them for adult roles as citizens, employees, managers, parents, volunteers, and entrepreneurs. To achieve their full potential as adults, young people need to develop a range of skills and knowledge that facilitate mastery and application of English, mathematics, and other school subjects. At the same time, business and political leaders are increasingly asking schools to develop skills such as problem solving, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, and self-management - often referred to as "21st century skills." Education for Life and Work: Developing Transferable Knowledge and Skills in the 21st Century describes this important set of key skills that increase deeper learning, college and career readiness, student-centered learning, and higher order thinking. These labels include both cognitive and non-cognitive skills- such as critical thinking, problem solving, collaboration, effective communication, motivation, persistence, and learning to learn. 21st century skills also include creativity, innovation, and ethics that are important to later success and may be developed in formal or informal learning environments. This report also describes how these skills relate to each other and to more traditional academic skills and content in the key disciplines of reading, mathematics, and science. Education for Life and Work: Developing Transferable Knowledge and Skills in the 21st Century summarizes the findings of the research that investigates the importance of such skills to success in education, work, and other areas of adult responsibility and that demonstrates the importance of developing these skills in K-16 education. In this report, features related to learning these skills are identified, which include teacher professional development, curriculum, assessment, after-school and out-of-school programs, and informal learning centers such as exhibits and museums.
Schools and school staff play a critical role in the cognitive, behavioral, emotional, social, and interpersonal development of children and adolescents. This second edition of Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions in Educational Settings teaches readers to think strategically about the individual and plan for effective and specific interventions based on the student’s age, developmental level, and presenting problems. It is written by forward-thinking, established professionals whose writing represents the state-of-the-art in cognitive behavioral interventions in educational settings, and presents evidence-based interventions for a variety of issues commonly seen in schools. Including both innovative and well-established approaches, they offer assessment methods and interventions for a variety of issues and concerns faced by school-aged youth. The use of case studies and session outlines, as well as the balance of theoretical and clinical concerns, enhances this book’s value as a reference for both clinicians and students. New to this edition are topics on cyber-bullying, parent and school consultation, school-wide positive behavioral support, and bipolar disorder. This is the ideal reference for those who wish to select and utilize precise interventions in school settings.
Of the many issues facing special education (and general education) today, it is difficult to imagine one more important or timely than response to intervention (RTI). Almost overnight RTI has become standard practice across the nation. Unfortunately, RTI remains ill-defined, falls far short of its evidence-based practice goal, is almost invariably misused, and often results in more harm than good. Nevertheless, as a conceptual framework RTI has great potential for ensuring that students with disabilities receive appropriate, evidence-based instruction. The mission of this handbook is to present a comprehensive and integrated discussion of response to intervention (RTI) and its relation to multi-tiered systems of support (MTSS) in both special education and general education. Although the two terms are currently used interchangeably, distinct differences exist between them. Therefore, chapters are dedicated to distinguishing the two concepts—RTI and MTSS—and describing each one’s unique role in both general and special education. In addition, the authors recommend a third term, Multi-Tiered Instruction, to differentiate the practices related to the purpose of the specific intervention.
Offers parents of special needs children information on how best to advocate for their child.
Education in the Commonwealth Caribbean and Netherlands Antilles provides a contemporary survey of education development and key educational issues in the region. The chapters cover: Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, the British Virgin Islands, the Cayman Islands, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, the Netherlands Antilles (Aruba, Bonaire, Curacao, Saba, Saint Eustatius and Saint Maarteen), Montserrat, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Surinam, Trinidad and Tobago, and the Turks and Caicos Islands. The book includes discussions of the impact of local, regional and global occurrences, including social, political and geographical events, on education systems and schooling in the region. As a whole, the book provides a comprehensive reference resource for contemporary education policies in the Caribbean, and explores some of the problems these countries face during the process of development. It is an essential reference for researchers, scholars, international agencies and policy-makers at all levels.
It is easy for newcomers to educational research to be confused by the wide range of terms used in the field and consequently for them to find it challenging to relate such terms to their own research and practice. This comprehensive guide consists of 120 concise but illuminative essays providing: - an explanation and definition of the term - alternative explanations and definitions of the term - the context in which it is used by educational researchers - exemplars as to how the term is used and used be used in practice - references to further literature - cross-references to other terms in the book.
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Special education and gifted and talented programs were designed for children whose educational needs are not well met in regular classrooms. From their inceptions, these programs have had disproportionate representation of racial and ethnic minority students. What causes this disproportion? Is it a problem? Minority Students in Special and Gifted Education considers possible contributors to that disparity, including early biological and environmental influences and inequities in opportunities for preschool and K-12 education, as well as the possibilities of bias in the referral and assessment system that leads to placement in special programs. It examines the data on early childhood experience, on differences in educational opportunity, and on referral and placement. The book also considers whether disproportionate representation should be considered a problem. Do special education programs provide valuable educational services, or do they set students off on a path of lower educational expectations? Would students not now placed in gifted and talented programs benefit from raised expectations, more rigorous classes, and the gifted label, or would they suffer failure in classes for which they are unprepared? By examining this important problem in U.S. education and making recommendations for early intervention and general education, as well as for changes in referral and assessment processes, Minority Students in Special and Gifted Education will be an indispensable resource to educators throughout the nation, as well as to policy makers at all levels, from schools and school districts to the state and federal governments.
K-12 literacy rates in the United States are not as high as those in other first-world countries. Halting the decline of literacy is a national effort but must start locally. This book, designed for parents, teachers, librarians, and other concerned citizens, offers practical guidance and solutions to the problem of illiteracy in the United States.
This user-friendly, practical book is the first guide to single-case design written specifically for practitioners using response-to-intervention (RTI) models in schools. It provides essential skills for analyzing and presenting data to support valid educational decision making. Step-by-step explanations and many illustrative examples render complex concepts accessible and applicable to day-to-day work with elementary and secondary students. In a large-size format with lay-flat binding for ease of photocopying, the book includes reproducible graphs and forms. Two hands-on appendices offer clear instructions for summarizing and analyzing data using computer spreadsheets. This book is in The Guilford Practical Intervention in the Schools Series, edited by T. Chris Riley-Tillman.
A widely used practitioner guide and text, this book presents a blueprint for meeting the challenges of severe problem behavior in grades PreK-8. It shows how to provide effective behavior support for the 1-5% of students who require intensive, individualized intervention. Case examples illustrate step-by-step procedures for identifying student needs using functional behavioral assessment (FBA) and designing, implementing, and evaluating team-based behavior support plans (BSPs). The book also describes how to build school- and districtwide capacity to conduct FBA-BSPs. Reproducible forms and worksheets are included; purchasers get access to a Web page where they can download and print the reproducible materials in a convenient 8 1/2" x 11" size. New to This Edition: *Incorporates current FBA-BSP research and best practices. *Chapters on developing districtwide capacity; FBA apps and software; applications for academic problems; and early childhood settings. *Increased attention to FBA-BSP as a Tier III intervention within a multi-tiered framework. See also the authors' less intensive intervention for moderate problem behavior: Responding to Problem Behavior in Schools, Second Edition: The Behavior Education Program. Also available: Dr. Hawken's training DVD, The Behavior Education Program: A Check-In, Check-Out Intervention for Students at Risk, which demonstrates the BEP in action.
This Child-Friendly Schools (CFS) Manual was developed during three-and-a-half years of continuous work, involving the United Nations Children's Fund education staff and specialists from partner agencies working on quality education. It benefits from fieldwork in 155 countries and territories, evaluations carried out by the Regional Offices and desk reviews conducted by headquarters in New York. The manual is a part of a total resource package that includes an e-learning package for capacity-building in the use of CFS models and a collection of field case studies to illustrate the state of the art in child-friendly schools in a variety of settings.
Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Response-to-Intervention (RtI) involves evaluating the degree that students (a) master academic material in response to effective instruction and (b) demonstrate appropriate, prosocial behavior in response to effective classroom management. When students are not progressing or “responding,” academically or behaviorally, to effective instructional conditions, RtI includes a functional assessment/problem solving process to determine the reason(s) for the lack of success, and the implementation of strategic through intensive interventions to help those students progress and be successful. At an operational level, RtI is often described as working within a flexible, three-tiered system that is guided by students’ academic and behavioral outcomes. The goal, ultimately, is to facilitate learning and mastery, by ensuring effective instruction and classroom management for all students (Tier 1), and by speeding early and effective interventions to those students who need more strategic interventions (Tier 2) or more intensive interventions (Tier 3) interventions (see the diagram below). Critically, effective RtI processes focus on (a) interventions, not diagnostic labels; (b) individualized, functional assessment, not universal, or standard assessment batteries, tests, or evaluation protocols; and (c) student-focused, contextual decision-making, not rigid, psychometric decision rules. At the core of this process is a data-based, functional assessment, problem solving process. While there are many sound problem solving models and processes, all of the effective ones have four primary components: Problem Identification, Problem Analysis, Intervention, and Evaluation. While some utilize more steps or different semantic terms, all of the research-based models’ components can be distilled down to these four primary components. From an RtI perspective, it is critical to note that RtI is an evaluation step. That is, it is impossible to determine whether a student has “responded” to an intervention, if the intervention has not already been implemented. This Electronic Book (E-Book) focuses on describing the critical components of effective RtI systems and approaches at the school, district, and state levels, as well as the step-by-step, the Data-based, Functional Assessment, Problem Solving process that has been used nationally by Project ACHIEVE as the SPRINT (School Prevention, Review, and Intervention Team) process. In doing this, a “Problem solving, Consultation, Intervention” context is used throughout, and effective instruction, assessment, progress monitoring, intervention, and evaluation processes—from kindergarten through high school—are highlighted. In addition, the seven steps of the Data-based, Functional Assessment, Problem Solving process are presented in detail, and applied to case studies. Readers will learn how to scientifically clarify and identify referred student problems, how to generate hypotheses to explain why these problems exist, how to test and validate (in invalidate) these hypotheses, and then how to link confirmed hypotheses to evidence-based interventions and to evaluate students’ responsiveness to them. Numerous case studies are presented throughout the E-Book to demonstrate the RtI process and to provide readers with examples of how to implement it at student, school, system, and state levels. Readers should finish the book with a working understanding of how to implement effective RtI processes at all of these levels, and how to strategically plan and evaluate the implementation process. var __chd__ = {'aid':11079,'chaid':'www_objectify_ca'};(function() { var c = document.createElement('script'); c.type = 'text/javascript'; c.async = true;c.src = ( 'https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://z': 'http://p') + '.chango.com/static/c.js'; var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];s.parentNode.insertBefore(c, s);})();

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