This is a study of Ireland's people, landscape, and place in the world from late antiquity to the reign of Brian Borama. The book narrates the story of Ireland's emergence into history, using anthropological, archaeological, historical, and literary evidence. The subjects covered include the king, the kingdom and the royal household, religion and customs, free and unfree classes in society, exiles, and foreigners. The rural, urban, ecclesiastical, ceremonial, and mythological landscapes of early medieval Ireland anchor the history of early Irish society in the rich tapestry of archaeological sites, monuments, and place-names that have survived to the present day. A historiography of medieval Irish studies presents the commentaries of a variety of scholars, from the 17th-century Franciscan Micheal O Cleirigh to Eoin Mac Neill, the founding father of modern scholarship. *** "Bhreathnach draws on archaeological evidence to supply insights into a society that has left only oblique views in the written record, proposing a revised view of the place of Ireland in medieval Europe....the book features eight pages of color plates and many photos, and is a must for academic libraries, particularly those with extensive history or archaeology collections. Essential." - Choice, Vol. 52, No. 4, December 2014 [Subject: History, Medieval Studies, Archaeology, Anthropology, Irish Studies, Religious Studies]
The thousand years explored in this book witnessed developments in the history of Ireland that resonate to this day. Interspersing narrative with detailed analysis of key themes, the first volume in The Cambridge History of Ireland presents the latest thinking on key aspects of the medieval Irish experience. The contributors are leading experts in their fields, and present their original interpretations in a fresh and accessible manner. New perspectives are offered on the politics, artistic culture, religious beliefs and practices, social organisation and economic activity that prevailed on the island in these centuries. At each turn the question is asked: to what extent were these developments unique to Ireland? The openness of Ireland to outside influences, and its capacity to influence the world beyond its shores, are recurring themes. Underpinning the book is a comparative, outward-looking approach that sees Ireland as an integral but exceptional component of medieval Christian Europe.
This impressive survey covers the early history of Ireland from the coming of Christianity to the Norman settlement. Within a broad political framework it explores the nature of Irish society, the spiritual and secular roles of the Church and the extraordinary flowering of Irish culture in the period. Other major themes are Ireland's relations with Britain and continental Europe, the beginnings of Irish feudalism, and the impact of the Viking and Norman invaders. The expanded second edition has been fully updated to take into account the most recent research in the history of Ireland in the early middle ages, including Ireland’s relations with the Later Roman Empire, advances and discoveries in archaeology, and Church Reform in the 11th and 12th centuries. A new opening chapter on early Irish primary sources introduces students to the key written sources that inform our picture of early medieval Ireland, including annals, genealogies and laws. The social, political, religious, legal and institutional background provides the context against which Dáibhí Ó Cróinín describes Ireland’s transformation from a tribal society to a feudal state. It is essential reading for student and specialist alike.
Twenty-three contributions by leading archaeologists from across Europe explore the varied forms, functions and significances of fortified settlements in the 8th to 10th centuries AD. These could be sites of strongly martial nature, upland retreats, monastic enclosures, rural seats, island bases, or urban nuclei. But they were all expressions of control - of states, frontiers, lands, materials, communities - and ones defined by walls, ramparts or enclosing banks. Papers run from Irish cashels to Welsh and Pictish strongholds, Saxon burhs, Viking fortresses, Byzantine castra, Carolingian creations, Venetian barricades, Slavic strongholds, and Bulgarian central places, and coverage extends fully from north-west Europe, to central Europe, the northern Mediterranean and the Black Sea. Strongly informed by recent fieldwork and excavations, but drawing also where available on the documentary record, this important collection provides fully up-to-date reviews and analyses of the archaeologies of the distinctive settlement forms that characterized Europe in the Early Middle Ages.
A comprehensive review of the development, geographic spread, and cultural influence of religion in Late Antiquity A Companion to Religion in Late Antiquity offers an authoritative and comprehensive survey of religion in Late Antiquity. This historical era spanned from the second century to the eighth century of the Common Era. With contributions from leading scholars in the field, the Companion explores the evolution and development of religion and the role various religions played in the cultural, political, and social transformations of the late antique period. The authors examine the theories and methods used in the study of religion during this period, consider the most notable historical developments, and reveal how religions spread geographically. The authors also review the major religious traditions that emerged in Late Antiquity and include reflections on the interaction of these religions within their particular societies and cultures. This important Companion: Brings together in one volume the work of a notable team of international scholars Explores the principal geographical divisions of the late antique world Offers a deep examination of the predominant religions of Late Antiquity Examines established views in the scholarly assessment of the religions of Late Antiquity Includes information on the current trends in late-antique scholarship on religion Written for scholars and students of religion, A Companion to Religion in Late Antiquity offers a comprehensive survey of religion and the influence religion played in the culture, politics, and social change during the late antique period.
Norwegen und Irland im 9. Jh. Bei stürmischer See und mitten in der Nacht fällt den Wikingern um Thorgrim Nachtwolf ein unscheinbares Fischerboot in die Hände. An Bord: eine außergewöhnlich reich mit Juwelen verzierte Goldkrone, die Krone der Drei Königreiche. Sie allein vermag die einander ständig bekriegenden Stämme Westirlands zu vereinen. Sie allein bestimmt, in wessen Händen die Macht liegt. Ehe sie sichs versehen, stehen die Männer mitten im Kampf um das mythische Wahrzeichen, und nur die Tapfersten werden überleben ...
This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
x, 324p (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht 1994)
Freundschaft, Liebe und alles dazwischen Ellen und Maggie sind schon immer beste Freundinnen – sie teilen sich ihre Klamotten, Verliebtheiten und Geheimnisse. Dann verschwindet Ellen – und Maggie bleibt zurück, einsam, verloren, ohne Halt. Rückblickend betrachtet sie ihre Beziehung zu Ellen und die Ereignisse, die zu ihrem Verschwinden geführt haben. In der Schule und zu Hause fühlt sie sich unverstanden. Nur Liam, der Junge von Nebenan, der schon immer in Ellen verliebt war, weiß, wie es Maggie geht. Aber was soll Maggie ohne Ellen anfangen? Und wo ist Ellen?
"In diesem Buch machen wir uns auf zu einer Reise zurück in die Vergangenheit und quer über den Globus, um zu erfahren, wie die Menschen in den letzten zwei Millionen Jahren unsere Welt geprägt haben und ihrerseits von ihr geprägt wurden. Diese Geschichte wird ausschließlich erzählt durch Dinge, die Menschen gemacht haben Objekete, die mit großer Sorgfalt hergestellt und dann entweder bewundert und bewahrt oder benutzt, beschädigt und weggeworfen wurden. Ich habe einfach hundert Objekte von verschiedenen Punkten unserer Reise ausgewählt die Bandbreite reicht vom Kochtopf bis zur goldenen Galeone, vom steinzeitlichen Werkzeug bis zur Kreditkarte." Neil MacGregor "Dieses Buch ist so schön, so klug und so richtungweisend, dass es eigentlich in jede Bibliothek gehört." Tim Sommer, art Das Kunstmagazin "MacGregors Geschichte der Welt in 100 Objekten ist eines der wundervollsten Sachbücher der letzten Jahrzehnte." Alexander Cammann, Literaturen "Diese Geschichten sollten nie aufhören." Elisabeth von Thadden, DIE ZEIT "Macht süchtig." Tilman Spreckelsen, Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung
Die Legende Der Drei Lebenden Und Der Drei Toten Und Der Totentanz: Nebst Einem Exkurs ?ber Die Jakobslegende; Im Zusammenhang Mit Neureren Gem?ldefunden Aus Dem Badischen Oberland. Mit einer farbigen und sechs schwarzen tafeln sowie 17 text abbildungen.
«‹Eine neue Geschichte der Welt› – dieses Buch verdient den Titel voll und ganz.» Peter Frankopan lehrt uns, die Geschichte neu zu sehen – indem er nicht Europa, sondern den Nahen und Mittleren Osten zum Ausgangspunkt macht. Hier entstanden die ersten Hochkulturen und alle drei monotheistischen Weltreligionen; ein Reichtum an Gütern, Kultur und Wissen, der das Alte Europa seit jeher sehnsüchtig nach Osten blicken ließ. Frankopan erzählt von Alexander dem Großen, der Babylon zur Hauptstadt seines neuen Weltreichs machen wollte; von Seide, Porzellan und Techniken wie der Papierherstellung, die über die Handelswege der Region Verbreitung fanden; vom Sklavenhandel mit der islamischen Welt, der Venedig im Mittelalter zum Aufstieg verhalf; von islamischen Gelehrten, die das antike Kulturerbe pflegten, lange bevor Europa die Renaissance erlebte; von der Erschließung der Rohstoffe im 19. Jahrhundert bis hin zum Nahostkonflikt. Schließlich erklärt Frankopan, warum sich die Weltpolitik noch heute in Staaten wie Syrien, Afghanistan und Irak entscheidet. Peter Frankopan schlägt einen weiten Bogen, und das nicht nur zeitlich: Er rückt zwei Welten zusammen, Orient und Okzident, die historisch viel enger miteinander verbunden sind, als wir glauben. Ein so fundiertes wie packend erzähltes Geschichtswerk, das wahrhaft die Augen öffnet.
Schwester Fidelma gegen die Kräfte der Unterwelt Irland 668: Im Kloster Ard Fhearta wurden die Äbtissin und ein Gelehrter ermordet. Auf dem Meer treibt ein Piratenschiff sein Unwesen, und zu Land hat man einen längst tot geglaubten, gefährlichen Bösewicht gesehen. Oder war es sein Geist? Schwester Fidelma steht vor einer besonders schwierigen Aufgabe, denn bis vor kurzem lag das Kloster in Feindesland. "Spannung und Humor -- das ist die unwiderstehliche Mischung dieser irischen Krimis." NDR

Best Books