This data-driven book analyzes factors that will improve the efficiency and quality of the American health care delivery system through the lens of physician supply in an era of managed care. Presenting policy recommendations and a broad range of perspectives from conversations with experts in health economics, medical education, and health policy, Scheffler's work makes accessible a critical and complex area of health care.
Many people assume that becoming a serious student of the Bible merely requires diligent study of English Bible translations, but biblical scholarship is much more complex. Is There a Doctor in the House? demonstrates what it takes to be a responsible Bible teacher, a well-published Bible scholar, or even a good student of the Bible: exacting knowledge of biblical languages and the languages in which most Bible scholarship is done; a love for history and archaeology; a sensitivity for literature and literary genres; and an understanding of theology, ethics, and ancient religions and philosophies. In one sense, every Bible scholar has to be a general practitioner—the foundation of biblical scholarship must be both broad and well built. Through the course of this book, Witherington invites would-be Bible experts to pursue excellence for the sake of the Bible’s world-altering message. From students considering a Ph.D. to lay Bible teachers, Is There a Doctor in the House? promises to be an informative, engaging, and often humorous resource.
Navigating today's medical environment is akin to trudging through the Amazon; challenges lurk around every corner, and without an experienced guide, one wrong turn can lead to financial and physical hardship. "Is There a Doctor in the House?" is rich with anecdotes and common sense suggestions from Dr. Glenn Cosh, a veteran family physician with over 45 years experience. Dr. Cosh offers insights into how medicine has evolved from the traditional doctor-patient relationship to a hi-tech/hi-cost system controlled by corporations and excessive government red tape, and proposes solutions to right the "sinking ship" that is healthcare in America today. His common sense advice includes how to choose a personal physician, how best to deal with common pains and fears, an easy, non-technical explanation of how our bodies function, and eight handy guidelines that can assist you in maintaining a balanced and healthy lifestyle.
This book explains how to overcome our feelings through the healing processes we experience in everyday situations in our own house, the church house, the schoolhouse, the corporate house, and the doctor’s or healing house. Enter into the journey of visiting each one of these houses, and find the doctor or healing process you may be searching for. Take the challenge. Is there a doctor in the house? Yes, there truly is. Read and you will find them all!
While most people think of Dr. Carson as a trailblazing neurosurgeon and an outspoken conservative, Candy, his wife of 40 years, knows him as so much more: a loving husband, a devoted father, a devout Christian, and a patriot. With her new book, Candy Carson introduces America to a man equally remarkable in his private life as he is in public. Above all, she shows us Dr. Carson as a believer: in God, in family, and in America.
Richard Gordon's acceptance into St Swithan's came as no surprise. However, it was a shock to discover that, once there, he would have to work. Fortunately, life proved not to be all work and no play. This hilarious hospital comedy is for anyone who wonders what medical students get up to. Just don't read it on the way to the doctor's!
A collection of Zaipiro cartoons from the Mail & Guardian, Sunday Times and Independent Newspapers.
While growing up in Trinidad, Annaise's longing to be a visual artist is influenced by the vibrant river scenes in her village, as well as the iridescent swirling colors she finds in the Jouvert streets of San Fernando during the Carnival season. Her relationships and her experiences open her eyes to the fierce and vulnerable edges of life and beauty in the Caribbean. As an adult Annaise goes to New York and begins to perceive a contradiction between the world of gallery art in Manhattan and the world of Caribbean art that she finds in Brooklyn. A visit with relatives in Toronto unearths old family secrets, hidden hostilities, and gives her a new understanding of immigrant family relations as well as art. Annaise goes to Trinidad to reconnect with her mother, and there she gains deeper insights into Indo-Caribbean culture through the feminine energies and rhythms that surround her and inspire her art. She returns to New York where she finds love and kinship in the Caribbean and African-American communities in Brooklyn, and she discovers the path that she must follow in order to create the jouvert arts of the street and the earth.
In this timely book, Jonathan D. Moreno takes up some of the most important questions in clinical ethics today. Moreno's view is that moral values emerge out of human experience, a view that creates a compelling conceptual framework for bioethics. To begin, Moreno recalls his experience as a hospital ethicist and how that shaped his understanding of what bioethics is about, both as theory and practice. His focus then turns to a difficult moral paradox: the need to advance medical knowledge by using human beings in research. His account of the way American medicine has reached a strong protectionist approach to managing this paradox leads to discussions of vulnerable groups whose circumstances demand that we reflect on the way this issue should be approached in the future. Moreno then takes up the historical and ethical role of the national security dimensions of human experimentation. His account casts a drastically different light on the origins of modern bioethics, especially on the central document of modern human experimentation, the Nuremberg Code. In the last section, Moreno pushes the bioethics envelope in a naturalistic examination of emerging values concerning the neurosciences and bioterrorism. Is There an Ethicist in the House? tackles difficult issues with clarity and insight. The book will be welcomed not only by medical professionals but also by lay readers who seek to understand the philosophical foundations of contemporary medical ethics.
"This funny, candid memoir about the author's intern year at a New York hospital provides a scorchingly frank look at how doctors are made, taking readers into the critical care unit to see one burgeoning physician's journey from ineptitude to competence. After his professional baseball career failed to launch, Matt McCarthy went to Harvard Medical School and on to a coveted residency slot in New York. But when he almost lost a patient on his first day after making what he believed to be a terrible error, he found himself facing the harsh reality of a new doctor's life--one in which even overachievers find themselves humbled, and in which med school training has little to offer in navigating the emotional rollercoaster of dealing with actual patients. Luckily for McCarthy, his second-year-resident adviser (whom he calls "Baio," owing to a resemblance to a Charles in Charge-era Scott Baio) was an offbeat genius, with a knack for breaking down the complicated process of treating patients. But neither doctor could offer much help to a patient named Barney, who had been living in the hospital while waiting for a new heart, and whom McCarthy slowly befriended over the course of the year in ways that changed his perception of what it means to be a physician. Mixing the tense drama of ER with the screwball humor of Scrubs, McCarthy offers a window on to hospital life that dispenses with sanctimony and self-seriousness while emphasizing the black-comic paradox of becoming a doctor: How do you learn how to save lives in a job where there is no practice? This "One L for doctors" will inspire and entertain physicians and patients alike"--
A Yale School of Medicine physician, columnist for "Diagnosis," and technical advisor for the television show House shares the experiences of doctors facing complex medical mysteries in order to illustrate the art and science of diagnosis. Reprint. A New York Times extended-list bestseller.

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