Benjamin Disraeli utilizes previously ignored or little known sources to provide new insights into how one of the most famous Jewish converts was viewed by the Jewish community he ignored and by the larger Christian world that would not accept him. This book shows how a myth can take on a life of its own in the collective memory of the Jewish people, as well as in the thought processes of a variety of anti-Semitic groups. Its fresh approach to the life and lore of a colorful Victorian figure also raises the issue of ethnic identity and minority acceptance in our pluralistic society.
This authoritative and comprehensive guide to key people and events in Anglo-Jewish history stretches from Cromwell's re-admittance of the Jews in 1656 to the present day and contains nearly 3000 entries, the vast majority of which are not featured in any other sources.
Die Liebe eines Enkels zu seinem Großvater, ein Leben für Bücher und ein Salon voller Ideen Hinter der unauffälligen Fassade eines Londoner Reihenhauses verbarg sich jahrzehntelang ein Wunderland für Bücherliebhaber. Chimen Abramsky hatte im Laufe seines Lebens eine der bedeutendsten Privatsammlungen Englands aufgebaut und sein Haus zu einem Salon intellektuellen Austausches gemacht. Voller Zärtlichkeit erinnert sich Sasha Abramsky an seinen Großvater und spürt dessen unvergleichlicher Bibliothek nach. Eine Familiengeschichte, die den Bogen zur Weltgeschichte schlägt.
This exhaustive, full-scale biography of the twentieth centurys most dedicated Gentile fighter against antisemitism is a key resource for those who would like to learn more of Parkes the man and his work in reconciling Christianity and Judaism. Virtually alone among Christians, James Parkes could audaciously announce to a Jewish audience that he spoke also as a Jew and be greeted not by suspicion but by applause. From his birthplace on the island of Guernsey, the book focuses on the formative influences on this important but neglected thinker. Tracing his career as a maverick historian and clergyman, it does not neglect to analyze how his ideas and commitments interacted with the twists and turns of his personal life.
From Karl Marx to the Marx brothers, the Routledge Who's Who in Jewish History presents a complete and thoroughly updated reference guide to over a thousand prominent men and women who have shaped Jewish culture. Covering twenty centuries of Jewish history it provides: * detailed biographical information on each leading figure * analysis of their role and significance both in Jewish life and the wider culture * a comprehensive chronological table displaying the history of the Jewish race * a series of maps * a useful glossary giving precise definitions of Jewish words.
The Merchant of Venice is best known for its complex and ambiguous portrait of the Jewish moneylender Shylock—and of European anti-Semitism. Fascinating in its engagement with prejudice, the play is also a comedy of cross-dressing and disguise, and a dramatic exploration of justice, mercy, and vengeance. This volume contains the full text of the play with explanatory footnotes and marginal glosses for contemporary readers. An extensive introduction and well-rounded selection of background materials not only illuminate anti-Semitism in early modern England but also provide context for other facets of the play, including its comic plot of love and marriage, its examination of commerce and international trade, and its themes of revenge and the law.
Part of the Jewish Encounter series A dandy, a best-selling novelist, and a man of political and sexual intrigue, Benjamin Disraeli was one of the most captivating figures of the nineteenth century. His flirtation with proto-Zionism, his ideas about power and empire, and his fantasies about the Middle East remain prophetically relevant today. How a man who was born a Jew--and who remained in the eyes of his countrymen a member of a despised minority--managed to become prime minister of England seems even today nothing short of miraculous. In this compelling biography, renowned poet and critic Adam Kirsch looks at Disraeli as a novelist as well as a statesman, recognizing that the outsider Jew who became one of the world's most powerful men was his own greatest character. Though baptized by his father at the age of twelve, Disraeli was seen--and saw himself--as a Jew. But her created an idea of Jewishness to rival the British notion of aristocracy. Disraeli was a figure of fascinating contradictions: an archconservative who benefited from England's liberal attitudes, a baptized Christian who saw Jewishness as a matter of racial superiority, a perennial outsider who dreamed of glory for England, which, in the words of one contemporary, became for Disraeli "the Israel of his imagination." From the Hardcover edition.
Becoming Freud is the story of the young Freud—Freud up until the age of fifty—that incorporates all of Freud’s many misgivings about the art of biography. Freud invented a psychological treatment that involved the telling and revising of life stories, but he was himself skeptical of the writing of such stories. In this biography, Adam Phillips, whom the New Yorker calls “Britain’s foremost psychoanalytical writer,” emphasizes the largely and inevitably undocumented story of Freud’s earliest years as the oldest—and favored—son of Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe and suggests that the psychoanalysis Freud invented was, among many other things, a psychology of the immigrant—increasingly, of course, everybody’s status in the modern world. Psychoanalysis was also Freud’s way of coming to terms with the fate of the Jews in Europe in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. So as well as incorporating the writings of Freud and his contemporaries, Becoming Freud also uses the work of historians of the Jews in Europe in this significant period in their lives, a period of unprecedented political freedom and mounting persecution. Phillips concludes by speculating what psychoanalysis might have become if Freud had died in 1906, before the emergence of a psychoanalytic movement over which he had to preside.
This book documents the devastating effects of genocide in the world's most destructive human environments since the end of World War II and explores why such events still occur.
An interdisciplinary collection of twelve essays, Romanticism/Judaica explores the four major areas of intersection: Nationalism and Diasporeanism, Religion and Anti-Semitism, Individualism and Assimilationism, and Criticism and Reflection. Chapters cover diasporeanism, Byron, Hyman Hurwitz and Coleridge, Solomon Maimon and Kant, Maria Polack, Grace Aguilar, the theater, boxing, Solomon David Luzzatto and Rousseau, Anglo-Jewish scholarship, Harold Fisch, Lionel Trilling, M. H. Abrams, Harold Bloom and Geoffrey Hartman.
Zichroni v. State of Israel tells the story of Amnon Zichroni, the Israeli civil rights lawyer whose legal and political battles from the early 1950s to the present day reveal a hitherto unknown chapter in the history of Israel: the struggle for human and civil rights in the country and in the occupied territories. Michael Keren's compelling narrative explores the seminal court cases in which Zichroni challenged the definition of citizenship by nationalist criteria; opposed the construction of West Bank settlements; and defended freedom of the press, association, and religion. The work offers a vivid portrayal of one man's campaign for justice in an embattled nation struggling to balance security imperatives with the rule of law.
The first reference book to deal so fully and incisively with the cultural representations of war in 20th-century English and US literature and film. The volume covers the two World Wars as well as specific conflicts that generated literary and imaginativ
Franz Kafka, der wohl enigmatischste Schriftsteller des 20. Jahrhunderts, begegnet in diesem Buch dem sanften, aufmerksamen, kritischen Blick eines Autors von Weltrang. Saul Friedländer, selbst in Prag geboren und ein Leben lang Kafka-Leser, betrachtet ihn mit jener zärtlichen Unbestechlichkeit, die auch die unnachahmliche Meisterschaft seiner Geschichte des Holocaust ausmacht. Friedländers Auge sieht manches, was selbst Jahrzehnte der Kafka-Forschung nicht wahrgenommen haben. Mit einer wundervollen Sprache und genauer Kenntnis der Werke, mit feinem Humor und genauer Beobachtungsgabe portraitiert Saul Friedländer Franz Kafka als Dichter der Scham und der Schuld. Er geht seinem Leben nach, befragt sein Judentum, analysiert die einzigartige Ironie Kafkas und geht auch den verschlungenen Seelenlagen nach, die tiefe Spuren im Werk hinterlassen haben. Eine Einführung in die Welt Kafkas von bezwingender Eleganz und Anmut.

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