This book introduces architects to a philosopher, Immanuel Kant, whose work was constantly informed by a concern for the world as an evolving whole. According to Kant, in this interconnected and dynamic world, humans should act as mutually dependent and responsible subjects. Given his future-oriented and ethico-politically concerned thinking, Kant is a thinker who clearly speaks to architects. This introduction demonstrates how his ideas bear pertinently and creatively upon the world in which we live now and for which we should care thoughtfully. Kant grounded his enlightened vision of philosophy’s mission using an architectural metaphor: of the modest 'dwelling-house'. Far from constructing speculative 'castles in the sky' or vertiginous 'towers which reach to the heavens', he tells us that his humble aim is rather to build a 'secure home for ourselves', one which appropriately corresponds at once to the limited material resources available on our planet, and to our need for firm and solid principles to live by. This book also explores Kant's notions of cosmopolitics, which attempts to think politics from a global perspective by taking into account the geographical fact that the earth is a sphere with limited land mass and natural resources. Given the urgent topicality of sustainable development, these Kantian texts are of particular interest for architects of today. Students of architecture, who are necessarily trained in negotiating between theory and practice, gain much from considering Kant, whose critical project also consisted of testing and exploring the viability of ideas, so as to ascertain to what extent, and crucially, how ideas can have a constructive effect on the whole world, and on us as active agents therein.
Architektur kann inspirierend und einnehmend sein, sie kann sogar im Sinne Goethes -das Leben steigern-. Wie kommt es aber, dass architektonische Entwurfe am Zeichentisch oder am Computer-Bildschirm zwar meist recht gut aussehen, in der gebauten Realitat jedoch oft enttauschen? Die Antwort hierfur, behauptet Juhani Pallasmaa, findet sich in der Vorherrschaft des Visuellen, die alle Bereiche von Technologie- und Konsumkultur umfasst und so auch in die Architekturpraxis und -lehre Einzug gehalten hat. Wahrend unsere Erfahrung der Welt auf der Kombination aller funf Sinne beruht, berucksichtigt die Mehrheit der heute realisierten Architektur gerade mal einen den Sehsinn. Die Unterdruckung der anderen Erfahrungsbereiche hat unsere Umwelt sinnlich verarmen lassen und ruft Gefuhle von Distanz und Entfremdung hervor. Erstmalig 1996 (in englischer Sprache) veroffentlicht, ist "Die Augen der Haut" inzwischen zu einem Klassiker der Architekturtheorie geworden, der weltweit zur Pflichtlekture an den Architekturhochschulen gehort. Das Buch besteht aus zwei Essays. Der erste gibt einen Uberblick uber die Entwicklung des okularzentrischen Paradigmas in der westlichen Kultur seit der griechischen Antike sowie uber dessen Einfluss auf unsere Welterfahrung und die Eigenschaften der Architektur. Der zweite Essay untersucht, welche Rolle die ubrigen Sinne bei authentischen Architekturerfahrungen spielen, und weist einen Weg in Richtung einer multisensorischen Architektur, welche ein Gefuhl von Zugehorigkeit und Integration ermoglicht. Seit der Erstveroffentlichung des Buchs hat die Rolle des Korpers und der Sinne ein gesteigertes Interesse in der Architekturphilosophie und Architekturlehre erfahren. Die neue, uberarbeitete und erganzte Ausgabe dieses wegweisenden Werks wird nicht nur Architekten und Studenten dazu anregen, eine ganzheitlichere Architektur zu entwerfen, sondern auch die Wahrnehmung des interessierten Laien bereichern. -Seit "Architektur Erlebnis" (1959) des danischen Architekten Steen Eiler Rasmussen hat es keinen derart pragnanten und klar verstandlichen Text mehr gegeben, der Studenten und Architekten in diesen kritischen Zeiten dabei helfen kann, eine Architektur des 21. Jahrhunderts zu entwickeln.- Steven Holl Juhani Pallasmaa ist einer der angesehensten finnischen Architekten und Architekturtheoretiker. In allen Bereichen seiner theoretischen und gestalterischen Tatigkeit welche Architektur, Grafik Design, Stadteplanung und Ausstellungen umfasst betont er stets die zentrale Rolle von Identitat, Sinneserfahrung und Taktilitat."
The eighteenth century struggled to define architecture as either an art or a science-the image of the architect as a grand figure who synthesizes all other disciplines within a single master plan emerged from this discourse. Immanuel Kant and Johann Wolfgang Goethe described the architect as their equal, a genius with godlike creativity. For writers from Descartes to Freud, architectural reasoning provided a method for critically examining consciousness. The architect, as philosophers liked to think of him, was obligated by the design and construction process to mediate between the abstract and the actual. In On the Ruins of Babel, Daniel Purdy traces this notion back to its wellspring. He surveys the volatile state of architectural theory in the Enlightenment, brought on by the newly emerged scientific critiques of Renaissance cosmology, then shows how German writers redeployed Renaissance terminology so that "harmony," "unity," "synthesis," "foundation," and "orderliness" became states of consciousness, rather than terms used to describe the built world. Purdy's distinctly new interpretation of German theory reveals how metaphors constitute interior life as an architectural space to be designed, constructed, renovated, or demolished. He elucidates the close affinity between Hegel's Romantic aesthetic of space and Daniel Libeskind's deconstruction of monumental architecture in Berlin's Jewish Museum. Through a careful reading of Walter Benjamin's writing on architecture as myth, Purdy details how classical architecture shaped Benjamin's modernist interpretations of urban life, particularly his elaboration on Freud's archaeology of the unconscious. Benjamin's essays on dreams and architecture turn the individualist sensibility of the Enlightenment into a collective and mythic identification between humans and buildings.
"Providing a concise and accessible introduction to the work of the twentieth century's celebrated German philosopher, Hans-Georg Gadamer, this book focuses on the aspects of Gadamer's philosophy that have been the most influential among architects, educators in architecture, and architectural theorists. Gadamer's philosophy of art gives a special place to the activity of "play" as it occurs in artistic creation, in language, and in thinking. His ideas on the function of symbols and meaning in art draw upon his teacher, Martin Heidegger, while developing further the applicability of Heideggerian thinking. His theory of interpretation, or "philosophical hermeneutics" offers profound ways to understand the influence of the past upon the present, and to appropriate the past in ever new forms. Gadamer's sensitivity to the way that theory arises out of practice and must maintain its relevance to practice gives his thought a remarkable usefulness and applicability. For architects, architectural theorists, architectural historians, and undergraduate and postgraduate students of architecture, Gadamer's thinking opens a world of possibilities for understanding how building today can be rich with human meaning, relating to architecture's history in an insightful manner that does not merely repeat nor merely repudiate that history"--
Philosophy for Architects is an engaging and easy-to-grasp introduction to philosophical questions of interest to students of architectural theory. Topics include Aristotle's theories of "visual imagination" and their relevance to digital design, the problem of optical correction as explored by Plato, Hegel's theory of zeitgeist, and Kant's examinations of space and aesthetics, among others. Focusing primarily on nineteenth- and twentieth-century philosophy, it provides students with a wider perspective concerning philosophical problems that come up in contemporary architectural debates.
The two volumes of Architectural Theory bring together the fundamental elements of architecture and present them in a new and accessible format. The books define the areas of knowledge necessary for successful design and criticism and, for the first time in the history of architectural literature, integrate all the concepts to form a balanced and comprehensive whole. Volume One, A History of the Categories in Architecture and Philosophy, establishes the framework of architectural theory. The author presents a systematic analysis of what constitutes 'good' architecture in the West, tracing the history of architectural theory through the metaphysics of ancient Greece, the doctrines of early and medieval Christianity, up to the concepts and 'categories' of modern philosophy. The twentieth century has seen more building and more analysis of building than any other. Volume Two, Principles of Twentieth-century Architectural Theory Arranged by Category, focuses on the recent fragmentation of architectural theory into distinct doctrines. Formalism, minimalism, mannerism, functionalism, rationalism, brutalism, positivism, romanticism, expressionism, classicism, constructivism, organicism, modernism, futurism, radicalism, deconstructivism, historicism, post-modernism - each movement has influenced the shape of architectural thinking over the last century. Principles of Twentieth-century Architectural Theory Arranged by Category analyses each in turn and places each in context. The volumes are liberally illustrated with representative buildings of the period and include a glossary of terms, a thesaurus, an annotated guide to further reading as well as diagrammatic links connecting themes across both volumes. The two volumes, whether studied together or individually, will prove invaluable to students of architecture and related disciplines.
Immanuel Kant: Kritik der Urteilskraft Erstdruck: Berlin und Libau (Lagarde und Friedrich) 1790. Der Text folgt der 2. Auflage: Berlin (Lagarde) 1793. Vollständige Neuausgabe mit einer Biographie des Autors. Herausgegeben von Karl-Maria Guth. Berlin 2016. Textgrundlage ist die Ausgabe: Immanuel Kant: Werke in zwölf Bänden. Herausgegeben von Wilhelm Weischedel. Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, 1977. Die Paginierung obiger Ausgabe wird in dieser Neuausgabe als Marginalie zeilengenau mitgeführt. Umschlaggestaltung von Thomas Schultz-Overhage. Gesetzt aus der Minion Pro, 11 pt.
(Autor) O. Vogel et al. (Titel) Software-Architektur (Untertitel) Grundlagen - Konzepte - Praxis (HL) Der umfassende Einstieg in die Software - Architektur! (copy) Dieser Titel behandelt das Thema Software- Architektur umfassend und strukturiert die Thematik mit Hilfe eines architektonischen Ordnungsrahmens. Es stellt den "Architekten" in den Mittelpunkt und bietet ihm langfristige Orientierung. Das Buch vermittelt essenzielles Wissen und zeigt, wie das erworbene Wissen konkret und in entsprechenden Projekten eingesetzt werden kann. Zu diesem Zweck enthält das Buch Anwendungsszenarien und Fallstudien aus verschiedenen Industriezweigen und Anwendungsdomänen. Das optimale Einstiegswerk für Softwareentwickler und Studenten. (Biblio)
Walter Benjamin beschreibt in dem Aufsatz Das Kunstwerk im Zeitalter seiner technischen Reproduzierbarkeit die geschichtlichen, sozialen und ästhetischen Prozesse, die mit der technischen Reproduzierbarkeit des Kunstwerkes zusammenhängen. In die Reihe der kunstsoziologischen Arbeiten Benjamins gehören auch die beiden hier zum ersten Mal in Buchform veröffentlichten Texte: Kleine Geschichte der Photographie (1931) und Eduard Fuchs, der Sammler und der Historiker (1937). Sie erhärten Benjamins Einsichten am Einzelfall.

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