States that karaoke creates its own culture, while reflecting much about the wider culture and the place of popular music as a media form. This book presents an observation on the external behavior of deejays, performers, and audience and an intimate portrait of the emotional rollercoaster that is the internal life of a karaoke singer.
This volume presents explorations in the literary turn in ethnographic work. Drawing from a range of disciplines, such as sociology, philosophy, psychology and English, the author demonstrates the ways in which ethnography can be effectively expressed.
Carolyn Ellis, the leading proponent of autoethnography, weaves both methodological advice and her own personal stories into an intriguing narrative about a fictional graduate course she instructs. Through Ellis's interactions with her students, you are given useful strategies for conducting a study, including the need for introspection, the struggles of the budding ethnographic writer, the practical problems in explaining results of this method to outsiders, and the moral and ethical issues that get raised in this intimate form of research.
Education without ethics, without sentiments, without heart, is simply soulless, factual academics and nothing more. In his array of authentic essays, Ronald J. Pelias poetically evokes the spiritual aspects of life in a seemingly dispassionate field—the academy. A Methodology of the Heart presents a procession of situational compositions confronting matters such as family relationships, student/teacher communications, and general life at the university. In his comical yet candid book, Pelias depicts the emotional battle for understanding and honesty within the conventional boundaries of higher education. It introduces such subjects as autoethnography, autobiography, personal narratives, memoir, creative non-fiction, and performative writing. It is absolutely a crucial addition to all book collectors with autoethnographic or communication interests as well as to the general reader attracted to daily life and higher education.
Alienating for some, yet most intimate and real for others, emerging communications technologies are creating a varied array of cyberspace experiences. Nowhere are the new and old more intertwined, as familiar narratives of the past and radical visions of the future inform our attempts to assess the impact of cyberspace on self and society. Amidst the dizzying pace of technological innovation, Annette N. Markham embarks on a unique, ethnographic approach to understanding internet users by immersing herself in on-line reality. The result is an engrossing narrative as well as a theoretically engaging journey. A cast of characters, the reflexive author among them, emerge from Markham's interviews and research to depict the complexity and diversity of internet realities. While cyberspace is hyped as a disembodied cultural arena where physical reality can be transcended, Markham finds that to understand how people experience the internet, she must learn how to be embodied there a process of acculturation and immersion which is not so different from other anthropological projects of cross-cultural understanding. Both new and not-so-new, cyberspace provides a context in which we can ask new sorts of questions about all cultural experience."
With an ethnographer's eye, Stacy Holman Jones provides a cultural critique of torch singing--describing the genre as a rich drama of passiveness, deception, desire, and resistance.
Elsie Martinez Trujillo Alcaraz, 'Naunny' to her grandson and communication scholar Nick Trujillo, was a working class woman, daughter of New Mexico Hispanos, and eventually the resident of a Los Angeles nursing home. She becomes the focal point for Trujillo's experimental ethnography of family relations, aging, and ethnic identity throughout the twentieth century. Collecting narratives of his grandmother's life, Trujillo learns how family members use stories to define the family's sense of itself and create collective views on intergenerational relations, social history, gender, class, and ethnicity. Through these stories, family photos, and his own recollections, supplemented with Elsie's letters and journal entries, the author is able to explore topics often ignored in life histories of the elderly--sexuality, body image, eating disorders, marital discord, mobility patterns, racial prejudice, and interactions with the health care system. Trujillo's presentation brings Naunny's humor, liveliness, and generosity alive for scholars and students alike and provides a vivid portrait of being Hispanic and female in the 20th century American west.
Listening to, buying and sharing music is an immensely important part of everyday life. Yet recent technological developments are increasingly changing how we use and consume music. This book collects together the most recent studies of music consumption, and new developments in music technology. It combines the perspectives of both social scientists and technology designers, uncovering how new music technologies are actually being used, along with discussions of new music technologies still in development. With a specific focus on the social nature of music, the book breaks new ground in bringing together discussions of both the social and technological aspects of music use. Chapters cover topics such as the use of the iPod, music technologies which encourage social interaction in public places, and music sharing on the internet. A valuable collection for anyone concerned with the future of music technology, this book will be of particular interest to those designing new music technologies, those working in the music industry, along with students of music and new technology.
This book will provide you with the basic practices and techniques required to carry out and monitor a small-scale research investigation. This new edition has the following New Learning Features: The writing and presentation styles have been dramatically altered in the new edition. Each chapter now leads off with an orientation outline and relevant quote. Furthermore, as a trigger device, important words and concepts are bolded and italicised. Six new "feature boxes" have also been added: Case Study illustrates a point by citing research or a real world example; Something to Remember underscores an important point; Idea provides straightforward, practical, "how to" advice; Your Research presents an opportunity for applying chapter materials to planning your own research project; Review and Discussion Questions assists in determining mastery of chapter content; Exercises contain activities that complement and expand upon chapter material.
Helps us in understanding cultural dimensions of various trends in European unification. Suitable for students, scholars, designers and politicians interested in European policy issues, this book analyses a range of symbols for Europe, interpreting their often contradictory or ambiguous dimensions of meaning
A radically new reading of the origins of recorded music Noise Uprising brings to life the moment and sounds of a cultural revolution. Between the development of electrical recording in 1925 and the outset of the Great Depression in the early 1930s, the soundscape of modern times unfolded in a series of obscure recording sessions, as hundreds of unknown musicians entered makeshift studios to record the melodies and rhythms of urban streets and dancehalls. The musical styles and idioms etched onto shellac disks reverberated around the globe: among them Havana’s son, Rio’s samba, New Orleans’ jazz, Buenos Aires’ tango, Seville’s flamenco, Cairo’s tarab, Johannesburg’s marabi, Jakarta’s kroncong, and Honolulu’s hula. They triggered the first great battle over popular music and became the soundtrack to decolonization. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Explores key themes in African music that have emerged in recent years-a subject usually neglected in country-by-country coverage emphasizes the contexts of musical performance-unlike studies that offer static interpretations isolated from other performing traditions presents the fresh insights and analyses of musicologists and anthropologists of diverse national origins-African, Asian, European, and American Charts the flow and influence of music. The Encyclopedia also charts the musical interchanges that followed the movement of people and ideas across the continent, including: cross-regional musical influences throughout Africa * Islam and its effect on African music * spread of guitar music * Kru mariners of Liberia * Latin American influences on African music * musical interchanges in local contexts * crossovers between popular and traditional practices. Audio CD included. Also includes nine maps and 96 music examples.
Over time Dutch and Indonesian musicians have inspired each other and they continue to do so. Recollecting Resonances offers a way of studying these musical encounters and a mutual heritage one today still can listen to.
In Travels with Ernest: Crossing the Literary/Sociological Divide, Laurel Richardson and Ernest Lockridge-accomplished sociologist and published novelist-explore the fascinating interplay between literary and ethnographic writing. The exciting result is an intriguing experimental text that simultaneously delves into, reveals, simplifies, and complicates methodologies of writing and conveying experience. Refusing to force their unique voices into one integrated account, the authors-also spouses-explicate their stories in separate narratives and then discuss in transcribed free-wheeling conversations their different constructions of their travels together, travels simultaneously experienced, but recalled and related differently through the filters of distinct professional perceptions, life histories, and interiors. This boundary-crossing text will provide an ideal platform for students and professors interested in understanding and exploring the absorbing complexities and possibilities of ethnographic writing,and creative nonfiction. Visit our website for sample chapters!
This volume brings together writers from a variety of disciplines to explore and illustrate the possibilities of new narrative forms in social research. The book is arranged into four areas of concern: representation, subjectivity, critique, and postmodern discourse.
From Muddy Waters to Mick Jagger, Elvis to Freddie Mercury, Jeff Buckley to Justin Timberlake, masculinity in popular music has been an issue explored by performers, critics, and audiences. From the dominance of the blues singer over his "woman" to the sensitive singer/songwriter, popular music artists have adopted various gendered personae in a search for new forms of expression. Sometimes these roles shift as the singer ages, attitudes change, or new challenges on the pop scene arise; other times, the persona hardens into a shell-like mask that the performer struggles to escape. Oh Boy! Masculinities and Popular Music is the first serious study of how forms of masculinity are negotiated, constructed, represented and addressed across a range of popular music texts and practices. Written by a group of internationally recognized popular music scholars—including Sheila Whiteley, Richard Middleton, and Judith Halberstam—these essays study the concept of masculinity in performance and appearance, and how both male and female artists have engaged with notions of masculinity in popular music.
The karaoke machine is much more than an instrument which allows us to be a star for three minutes. The contributors to this lively collection address the importance of karaoke within Japanese culture and its spread to other parts of the world, exploring the influence of karaoke in such different societies as the United Kingdom, North America, Italy, Sweden, Korea and Brazil. They also consider the nature of the karaoke experience, which involves people as singers, co-singers and listeners.
This book is an innovative ethnographic work aimed at students and others interested in contemporary Southeast Asia. Its made up of short essays, or portraits, of figures that populate the social and cultural world of contemporary Southeast Asia, figure
In "Performing Rites," one of the most influential writers on popular music asks what we talk about when we talk about music. Instead of dismissing emotional response and personal taste as inaccessible to the academic critic, Simon Frith takes these forms of engagement as his subject--and discloses their place at the very center of the aesthetics that structure our culture and color our lives.
Screenwriting in a Digital Era examines the practices of writing for the screen from early Hollywood to the new realism. Looking back to prehistories of the form, Kathryn Millard links screenwriting to visual and oral storytelling around the globe, and explores new methods of collaboration and authorship in the digital environment.

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