'The sheer range of West's interests and insights is staggering and exemplary: he appears equally comfortable talking about literature, ethics, art, jurisprudence, religion, and popular-cultural forms.' - Artforum Keeping Faith is a rich, moving and deeply personal collection of essays from one of the leading African American intellectuals of our age. Drawing upon the traditions of Western philosophy and modernity, Cornel West critiques structures of power and oppression as they operate within American society and provides a way of thinking about human dignity and difference afresh. Impressive in its scope, West confidently and deftly explores the politics and philosophy of America, the role of the black intellectual, legal theory and the future of liberal thought, and the fate of African Americans. A celebration of the extraordinary lives of ordinary Americans, Keeping Faith is a petition to hope and a call to faith in the redemptive power of the human spirit.
Keeping Faith is Jimmy Carter's account of the satisfaction, frustration, and solitude that attend the man in the Oval Office. Mr. Carter writes candidly about the crises that confronted him during his tenure as President of the United States and Leader of the free world, from 1977 to 1981. "The President who cared" details his anguish over the hostage crisis in Iran, his triumph against all odds at Camp David, his secret communications with China's Deng Xiaoping, and his dramatic and revealing encounters with Soviet President Leonid Brezhnev, West German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt, and other world leaders. Mr. Carter also shares glimpses of his private world - his feelings of being an outsider in Washington, his relationship with Rosalynn, his pain about the attacks on his friends and his brother Billy. Captivatingly written, this rich historical document delineates a morally responsible president who has continued to earn respect and admiration as a world statesman and advocate for the poor and repressed of all nations.
In 1981, Frederick Houk Borsch returned to Princeton University, his alma mater, to serve as dean of the chapel at the Ivy League school. In Keeping Faith at Princeton, Borsch tells the story of Princeton's journey from its founding in 1746 as a college for Presbyterian ministers to the religiously diverse institution it is today. He sets this landmark narrative history against the backdrop of his own quest for spiritual illumination, first as a student at Princeton in the 1950s and later as campus minister amid the turmoil and uncertainty of 1980s America. Borsch traces how the trauma of the Depression and two world wars challenged the idea of progress through education and religion--the very idea on which Princeton was founded. Even as the numbers of students gaining access to higher education grew exponentially after World War II, student demographics at Princeton and other elite schools remained all male, predominantly white, and Protestant. Then came the 1960s. Campuses across America became battlegrounds for the antiwar movement, civil rights, and gender equality. By the dawn of the Reagan era, women and blacks were being admitted to Princeton. So were greater numbers of Jews, Catholics, and others. Borsch gives an electrifying insider's account of this era of upheaval and great promise. With warmth, clarity, and penetrating firsthand insights, Keeping Faith at Princeton demonstrates how Princeton and other major American universities learned to promote religious diversity among their students, teachers, and administrators.
The Catholic Church in the United States has always been an immigrant church, from the earliest arrivals of the Spanish and English, to the influx of Irish, Germans, Italians, and other Europeans in the nineteenth century, to the most recent arrivals from the Philippines and Vietnam. Over two centuries countless laymen and laywomen worked with priests and religious to build and support churches and schools, laying the foundation for the Catholic Church in the United States. The wealth of original documents and photographs in Keeping Faith provides as no other source does a thorough and compelling portrait of these immigrants and their impact on the American Catholic institutions and American Catholic experience.
For the millions who had fought in the Great War, and for their families, the 'land fit for heroes' turned out to be an illusion; instead there was suffering and deprivation. Out of this, on 1 July 1921 was born the British Legion. In the years that followed the Legion fought for justice for the ex-service community, meanwhile seeking to protect them. It introduced the Poppy Appeal and insisted on an annual act of national Remembrance for the fallen. It went to extraordinary lengths to try to prevent another war, ultimately finding itself in controversial discussions with Hitler. Even after the Second World War the Legion's work was far from over; the war-disabled and the war widows seemed to have been forgotten in the new welfare state. Remembrance itself appeared to be under threat as the memory of war receded. There were more battles to be fought, while conflicts such as the Gulf War brought fresh problems. Perhaps most inspiring is the human aspect. Those who have done the Legion's work represent every class of society, from admirals and former private soldiers to poppy collectors. But they have one thing in common: compassion for all who have suffered in the service of the country. This is their story too.
In this sensitive intellectual biography David W. Blight undertakes the first systematic analysis of the impact of the Civil War on Frederick Douglass' life and thought, offering new insights into the meaning of the war in American history and in the Afro-American experience. Frederick Douglass' Civil War follows Douglass' intellectual and personal growth from the political crises of the 1850s through secession, war, black enlistment, emancipation, and Reconstruction. This book provides an engrossing story of Douglass' development of a social identity in relation to transforming events, and demonstrates that he saw the Civil War as the Second American Revolution, and himself as one of the founders of a new nation. Through Douglass' life, his voice, and his interpretations we see the Civil War era and its memory in a new light.
Observing an encounter between Catholic and Buddhist monks in 1996 at the Abbey of Gethsemani, near where he grew up in rural Kentucky, Fenton Johnson found himself unable to make the sign of the cross. His distance from his childhood faith had become so great -- he considered himself a rational, skeptical man -- that he could not participate in this most basic ritual. Impelled by this troubling experience, Johnson began a search for the meaning of the spiritual life, a journey that took him from Gethsemani to the San Francisco Zen Center, through Buddhism and back to Christianity, from paralyzing doubt to a life-enriching faith. Keeping Faith explores the depths of what it means for a skeptic to have and to keep faith. Johnson grew up with the Trappist monks, but rejected institutionalized religion as an adult. While living as a member of the Gethsemani community and the Zen Center, however, he learned to practice Christian rituals with a new discipline and studied Buddhist meditation, which brought him a new understanding of the deep relationship between sexuality and faith, body and spirit. Changed in profound ways, Johnson ultimately turned back to his childhood faith, now inflected with the accumulated wisdom of his journey. Johnson interweaves memoir, the personal and often shocking stories of Buddhist and Christian monks, and a revealing history of the contemplative life in the West. He offers lay Christians an understanding of the origins and history of their contemplative traditions and provides the groundwork needed to challenge orthodox understandings of spirituality. No matter their backgrounds, readers will find Keeping Faith a work of great power and immediacy.
In Keeping Faith the innocence and certainties of childhood are delicately tested against the realities of adult life. Josh and Gracie grow up in a working class world centred on the values of faith and family. Both cherish their father, a lay preacher, and their mother, but for Josh the complex secrets, doubts and subtleties of the world do not allow for certainty. In adulthood he works as a labour ward attendant, his younger sister Gracie as a nurse on a remote mission station in Papua New Guinea. While Josh's conviction falters, the unfailing faith of his sister leads to tragic consequences. As events move between 1975 and 1994, between a family drama in outer suburban Melbourne and a tribal rebellion in Melanesia, faith and doubt become entwined. In the spirit of the work of Tim Winton, Keeping Faith is a remarkable novel about the beauty and disappointments of childhood, family and belief, about losing faith and finding love.
“A triumph. This novel’s haunting strength will hold the reader until the very end and make Faith and her story impossible to forget.” —Richmond Times Dispatch “Extraordinary.” —Orlando Sentinel From the #1 New York Times bestselling author Jodi Picoult (Nineteen Minutes, Change of Heart, Handle with Care) comes Keeping Faith: an “addictively readable” (Entertainment Weekly) novel that “makes you wonder about God. And that is a rare moment, indeed, in modern fiction” (USA Today).
Keeping Faith in Practice is a Roman Catholic reflection on Practical and Pastoral Theology. This book presents an exploration of how theology engages with the dimension of practice in the life of the Church and contemporary society and culture. It covers the main focal points of a Catholic view of pastoral/practical theology.
Hannah Riley's life revolves around her daughter, Faith They live with Hannah's mother, who refers to the family home as the henhouse. "We're like a bunch of hens clucking around our chick," she explains. Especially true when Hannah's sister and two aunts come to stay. Little Faith is the center of everyone's attention. But now Liam Tully, the man Hannah never stopped loving, is back in town. And he's demanding answers about Faith—the daughter nobody told him about. Life in the henhouse is about to change forever….
Chief Justice John Marshall argued that a constitution "requires that only its great outlines should be marked [and] its important objects designated." Ours is "intended to endure for ages to come, and consequently, to be adapted to the various crises of human affairs." In recent years, Marshall's great truths have been challenged by proponents of originalism and strict construction. Such legal thinkers as Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia argue that the Constitution must be construed and applied as it was when the Framers wrote it. In Keeping Faith with the Constitution, three legal authorities make the case for Marshall's vision. They describe their approach as "constitutional fidelity"--not to how the Framers would have applied the Constitution, but to the text and principles of the Constitution itself. The original understanding of the text is one source of interpretation, but not the only one; to preserve the meaning and authority of the document, to keep it vital, applications of the Constitution must be shaped by precedent, historical experience, practical consequence, and societal change. The authors range across the history of constitutional interpretation to show how this approach has been the source of our greatest advances, from Brown v. Board of Education to the New Deal, from the Miranda decision to the expansion of women's rights. They delve into the complexities of voting rights, the malapportionment of legislative districts, speech freedoms, civil liberties and the War on Terror, and the evolution of checks and balances. The Constitution's framers could never have imagined DNA, global warming, or even women's equality. Yet these and many more realities shape our lives and outlook. Our Constitution will remain vital into our changing future, the authors write, if judges remain true to this rich tradition of adaptation and fidelity.
As the twenty-first century dawns, public land policy is entering a new era. This timely book examines the historical, scientific, political, legal, and institutional developments that are changing management priorities and policies—developments that compel us to view the public lands as an integrated ecological entity and a key biodiversity stronghold. Once the background is set, each chapter opens with a specific natural resource controversy, ranging from the Pacific Northwest’s spotted owl imbroglio to the struggle over southern Utah’s Colorado Plateau country. Robert Keiter uses these case histories to analyze the ideas, forces, and institutions that are both fomenting and retarding change. Although Congress has the final say in how the public domain is managed, the public land agencies, federal courts, and western communities are each playing important roles in the transformation to an ecological management regime. At the same time, a newly emergent and homegrown collaborative process movement has given the public land constituencies a greater role in administering these lands. Arguing that we must integrate the new imperatives of ecosystem science with our devolutionary political tendencies, Keiter outlines a coherent new approach to natural resources policy.
A Woman on a Mission The wagon train ride from Missouri to Kansas territory is rife with perils. But there are bigger obstacles for Dr. Victoria Fenway than cholera or creek floods. Years ago, she and wagon-train captain Joseph Rickard were deeply in love. Now, Victoria is tracking the man who killed her late husband, and she is determined to continue his work rescuing slaves. She can't allow herself to fall for Joseph again—not when he abandoned her once before. Joseph told Victoria he'd love her forever, and he's been as good as his word. Misunderstanding led to her marrying another man. But with dangerous slavers on their trail, he'll do anything to keep her safe until they reach a new home—and a second chance.
Die Ehe von Mariah und Colin White ist gescheitert. Ihre siebenjährige Tochter Faith reagiert zunächst mit Schweigen, beginnt aber bald mit einer unsichtbaren Beschützerin zu reden. Als Faith übersinnliche Fähigkeiten entwickelt, geraten Mutter und Tochter ins Zentrum eines aufdringlichen Medieninteresses. Nur Ian kommt ihnen zur Hilfe, ein gewiefter Reporter, der sich jedoch Hals über Kopf in Mariah verliebt, was die Dinge nicht einfacher macht... Eine meisterhaft erzählte Geschichte über Wahrheit und Zweifel.
Explore your spiritual life. Create a personal theology. Challenge and test your faith--all using the Book of Psalms. The Book of Psalms has been beloved by generations of readers. It offers solace in times of trouble, holds out hope for rescue and redemption and helps to answer some of the difficult questions raised by faith. The Book of Psalms is more personal than other books of the Bible; instead of telling stories with God as the central actor, the psalmists talk to--and about--God. Keeping Faith with the Psalms leads you into the Bible to discover ways you can use the Psalms to shape your own personal spiritual outlook. Daniel Polish does not give any simple solutions, but reveals how you can discover answers for yourself through the Psalms. You will explore: Meeting God in Nature Finding God in Torah Finding God through the Historical Experience of the Jewish People The Problem of Evil in Our World Facing Our Mortality Finding Our Relationship with God Jerusalem as Symbol and Reality What Does the Lord Require? The Call to Social Justice Through the threads of meaning, questions, and perspectives offered in the psalms themselves, Rabbi Polish's guide offers an intimate look at the issues that touch and influence your personal theology.
The human rights regime is one of modernity's great civilizing triumphs. From the formal promulgation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948 to the subsequent embrace of this declaration by the newly independent states of Africa, human rights have emerged as the primary discourse of global politics and as an increasingly prominent category in the international and domestic legal system. But throughout their history, human rights have endured sustained attempts at disenfranchisement. In this provocative study, Linda Hogan defends human rights language while simultaneously reenvisioning its future. Avoiding problematic claims about shared universal values, Hogan draws on the constructivist strand of political philosophy to argue for a three-pronged conception of human rights: as requirements for human flourishing, as necessary standards of human community, and as the basis for emancipatory politics. In the process, she shows that it is theoretically possible and politically necessary for theologians to keep faith with human rights. Indeed, the Christian tradition—the wellspring of many of the ethical commitments considered central to human rights—must embrace its vital role in the project.
One of the very few books that speaks knowledgeably and compassionately about both spiritual and psychological aspects of divorce, Ending Marriage, Keeping Faith is an invitation to experience even the pain and confusion of divorce as a spiritual journey rather than an absolute ending. Thousands of readers have said that this book was the one thing they read that gave them both understanding and hope in the dark hours of their divorce experience. Dr. Nichols challenges much of the conventional wisdom about divorce, both religious and psychological, building the case that divorce can be a growth pilgrimage with a fundamental spiritual direction, reassuring landmarks, companionship along the way, and finally a safe ending. J. Randall Nichols' book is one of the fruits of his own painful but re-creative divorce experience, and he has written it to provide the kind of hope, insight, and guidance he could not find elsewhere to others like himself.
Samenvatting.

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