Key Concepts in Historical Geography forms part of an innovative set of companion texts for the Human Geography sub-disciplines. Organized around 24 short essays, it provides a cutting edge introduction to the central concepts that define contemporary research in Historical Geography. Involving detailed and expansive discussions, the book includes: An introductory chapter providing a succinct overview of the recent developments in the field 24 key concepts entries with comprehensive explanations, definitions and evolutions of the subject Extensive pedagogic features that enhance understanding including a glossary, figures, diagrams and further reading Key Concepts in Historical Geography is an ideal companion text for upper-level undergraduate and postgraduate students and covers the expected staples from the discipline - from people, space and place to colonialism and geopolitics - in an accessible style. Written by an internationally recognized set of authors, it is is an essential addition to any geography student's library.
"A comprehensive and highly readable review of the conceptual underpinnings of economic geography. Students and professional scholars alike will find it extremely useful both as a reference manual and as an authoritative guide to the numerous theoretical debates that characterize the field." - Allen J. Scott, University of California "Guides readers skilfully through the rapidly changing field of economic geography... The key concepts used to structure this narrative range from key actors and processes within global economic change to a discussion of newer areas of research including work on financialisation and consumption. The result is a highly readable synthesis of contemporary debates within economic geography that is also sensitive to the history of the sub-discipline." - Sarah Hall, University of Nottingham "The nice thing about this text is that it is concise but with depth in its coverage. A must have for any library, and a useful desk reference for any serious student of economic geography or political economy." - Adam Dixon, Bristol University Organized around 20 short essays, Key Concepts in Economic Geography provides a cutting edge introduction to the central concepts that define contemporary research in economic geography. Involving detailed and expansive discussions, the book includes: An introductory chapter providing a succinct overview of the recent developments in the field. Over 20 key concept entries with comprehensive explanations, definitions and evolutions of the subject. Extensive pedagogic features that enhance understanding including figures, diagrams and further reading. An ideal companion text for upper-level undergraduate and postgraduate students in economic geography, the book presents the key concepts in the discipline, demonstrating their historical roots and contemporary applications to fully understand the processes of economic change, regional growth and decline, globalization, and the changing locations of firms and industries. Written by an internationally recognized set of authors, the book is an essential addition to any geography student's library.
Physical Geography: The Key Concepts is a thought-provoking and up-to-date introduction to the central ideas and debates within the field. It provides extended definitions of terms that are fundamental to physical geography and its many branches, covering topics such as: biogeography ecology climatology meteorology geomorphology hydrology pedology Complete with informative tables, diagrams, and suggestions for further reading, this is a highly accessible guide for those studying physical geography and related courses.
"This book clearly outlines key concepts that all geographers should readily be able to explain. It does so in a highly accessible way. It is likely to be a text that my students will return to throughout their degree." - Dr Karen Parkhill, Bangor University "The editors have done a fantastic job. This second edition is really accessible to the student and provides the key literature in the key geographical terms of scale, space, time, place and landscape." - Dr Elias Symeonakis, Manchester Metropolitan University "An excellent introductory text for accessible overviews of key concepts across human and physical geography." - Professor Patrick Devine-Wright, Exeter University Including ten new chapters on nature, globalization, development and risk, and a new section on practicing geography, this is a completely revised and updated edition of the best-selling, standard student resource. Key Concepts in Geography explains the key terms - space, time, place, scale, landscape - that define the language of geography. It is unique in the reference literature as it provides in one volume concepts from both human geography and physical geography. Four introductory chapters on different intellectual traditions in geography situate and introduce the entries on the key concepts. Each entry then comprises a short definition, a summary of the principal arguments, a substantive 5,000-word discussion, the use of real-life examples, and annotated notes for further reading. Written in an accessible way by established figures in the discipline, the definitions provide thorough explanations of all the core concepts that undergraduates of geography must understand to complete their degree.
"An excellent and supremely accessible guide to some key issues in development geography" - Stuart Corbridge, London School of Economics "Provides a clearly stated, informed and strongly structured pathway through the key literatures and debates" - Jonathan Rigg, Durham University Organized around 24 short essays, Key Concepts in Development Geography is an introductory text that provides students with the core concepts that form contemporary research and ideas within the development geography discipline. Written in a clear and transparent style, the book includes: an introductory chapter providing a succinct overview of the recent developments in the field over 24 key concept entries that provide comprehensive definitions, explanations and evolutions of the subject excellent pedagogy to enhance students' understanding including a glossary, figures, diagrams, and further reading. Organized around five of the most important areas of concern, the book covers: the meanings and measurement of development; its theory and practice; work, employment and development; people, culture and development; and contemporary issues in development. The perfect companion for undergraduate and postgraduate students on geography degrees, the book is a timely look at the pressingly important field of international development studies today.
This book presents a practical, holistic research framework to help us both understand our past and build an appealing human future.
In Germanic and Nordic languages, the term for ‘public health’ literally translates to ‘people’s health’, for example Volksgesundheit in German, folkhälsa in Swedish and kansanterveys in Finnish. Covering a period stretching from the late nineteenth century to the present day, this book discusses how understandings and meanings of public health have developed in their political and social context, identifying ruptures and redefinitions in its conceptualisation. It analyses the multifaceted and interactive rhetorical play through which key concepts have been used as political tools, on the one hand, and shaped the understanding and operating environment of public health, on the other. Focusing on the blurred boundaries between the social and the medico-scientific realms, from social hygiene to population policy, Conceptualising Public Health explores the sometimes contradictory and paradoxical normative aims associated with the promotion of public health. Providing examples from Northern Europe and the Nordic countries, whilst situating them in a larger European and international context, it addresses questions such as: How have public health concepts been used in government and associated administrative practices from the early twentieth century up to the present? How has health citizenship been constructed over time? How has the collective entity of ‘the people’ been associated with and reflected in public health concepts? Drawn from a range of disciplinary backgrounds, the authors collected here each examine a particular way of understanding public health and assess how key actors or phenomena have challenged, altered or confirmed past and present meanings of the concept. Conceptualising Public Health is of interest to students and scholars of health and welfare state development from diverse backgrounds, including public health, sociology of health and illness, and social policy as well as medical, conceptual and intellectual history.
"Practical, accessible, careful and interesting, this...revised volume brings the subject up-to-date and explains, in bite sized chunks, the "how's" and "why's" of modern day geographical study...[It] brings together physical and human approaches again in a new synthesis." - Danny Dorling, Professor of Geography, University of Oxford Key Methods in Geography is the perfect introductory companion, providing an overview of qualitative and quantitative methods for human and physical geography. New to the third edition: 12 new chapters representing emerging themes including online, virtual and digital geographical methods Real-life case study examples Summaries and exercises for each chapter Free online access to full text of Progress in Human Geography and Progress in Physical Geography Progress Reports The teaching of research methods is integral to all geography courses: Key Methods in Geography, 3rd Edition explains all of the key methods with which geography undergraduates must be conversant.
Key Concepts in Planning forms part of an innovative set of companion texts for the Human Geography sub-disciplines. Organized around 20 short essays, Key Concepts in Planning provides a cutting edge introduction to the central concepts that define contemporary research in Planning. Involving detailed and expansive discussions, the book includes: An introductory chapter providing a succinct overview of the recent developments in the field Over 20 key concept entries with comprehensive explanations, definitions and evolutions of the subject Extensive pedagogic features that enhance understanding including a glossary, figures, diagrams and further reading
Dr Williams begins by exploring the role of the forest in American culture: the symbols, themes, and concepts - for example, pioneer woodsman, lumberjack, wilderness - generated by contact with the vast land of trees. He considers the Indian use of the forest, describing the ways in which native tribes altered it, primarily through fire, to promote a subsistence economy.
This innovative book provides a dynamic—and often surprising—view of the range of environmental issues facing the United States today. A distinguished group of scholars examines the growing temporal, spatial, and thematic breadth of topics historical geographers are now exploring. Seventeen original chapters examine topics such as forest conservation, mining landscapes, urban environment justice, solid waste, exotic species, environmental photography, national and state park management, recreation and tourism, and pest control. Commemorating the twenty-fifth anniversary of the publication of the seminal work The American Environment: Interpretations of Past Geographies, the book clearly shows much has changed since 1992. Indeed, not only has the range of issues expanded, but an increasing number of geographers are forging links with environmental historians, promoting a level of intellectual cross-fertilization that benefits both disciplines. As a result, environmental historical geographies today are richer and more diverse than ever. The American Environment Revisited offers a comprehensive overview that gives both specialist and general readers a fascinating look at our changing relationships with nature over time.
Historical GIS is an emerging field that uses Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to research the geographies of the past. Ian Gregory and Paul Ell's study, first published in 2007, comprehensively defines this field, exploring all aspects of using GIS in historical research. A GIS is a form of database in which every item of data is linked to a spatial location. This technology offers unparalleled opportunities to add insight and rejuvenate historical research through the ability to identify and use the geographical characteristics of data. Historical GIS introduces the basic concepts and tools underpinning GIS technology, describing and critically assessing the visualisation, analytical and e-science methodologies that it enables and examining key scholarship where GIS has been used to enhance research debates. The result is a clear agenda charting how GIS will develop as one of the most important approaches to scholarship in historical geography.
Key Concepts in Rural Geography is a new kind of textbook that forms part of an innovative set of companion texts for the Human Geography sub-disciplines. Organized around 20 short essays, Key Concepts in Rural Geography provides a cutting edge introduction to the central concepts that define contemporary research in rural geography. Involving detailed and expansive discussions, the book includes: - an introductory chapter providing a succinct overview of the recent developments in the field - over 20 key concept entries with comprehensive explanations, definitions and evolutions of the subject - extensive pedagogic features that enhance understanding including a glossary, figures, diagrams and further reading Key Concepts in Rural Geography is an ideal companion text for upper-level undergraduate and postgraduate students in rural geography and covers the expected staples of the sub-discipline from agricultural geography and counterurbanization to hybridity and community. Written by an internationally recognized set of authors, Key Concepts in Rural Geography is an essential addition to any geography student's library.
Broad in scope and edited by two massive names in geography, this is a critical exploration of how the field has emerged and fared over the course of its modern institutionalization.
"A comprehensive reader for my political geography course. Good summaries at the end, and articles include effective case study examples." - Rachel Paul, Western Washington University "A very useful and comprehensive introduction to key concepts in political geography. This book provides useful context not just for 'traditional' political geography modules, but also those examining broader issues of power, resistance and social movements." - Gavin Brown, University of Leicester "Vital for introducing basic concepts and terminology in a clear and concise fashion. The short chapters are accessible and well supplemented with pertinent examples." - Daniel Hammett, Sheffield University "I found the book to be very useful in a supplemental capacity, full of information that would be useful for an undergraduate or early graduate student." - Jason Dittmer, University College London This textbook forms part of an innovative set of companion texts for the human geography subdisciplines. Organized around 20 short essays, Key Concepts in Political Geography provides a cutting-edge introduction to the central concepts that define contemporary research in the field. Involving detailed yet expansive discussions, the book includes: An introductory chapter providing a succinct overview of the recent developments in the field Over 20 key concept entries covering the expected staples of the sub-discipline, such as nationalism, territoriality, scale and political-economy, as well as relatively new arrivals to the field including the other, anti-statism, gender, and post-conflict A glossary, figures, diagrams and further reading. It is essential reading for undergraduate and postgraduate students of political geography.
Now in a fourth edition, this standard student reference has been totally revised and updated. It remains the definitive introduction to the history, philosophy, and methodology of human geography; now including a detailed explanation of key ideas in human geography's post-modernist and post-structuralist 'turns'. The book is organized into six sections: What is Geography?: an introduction to the discipline, and a discussion of its organization and basic research approaches, informed by the question 'what difference does it make to think geographically?' Foundations of Geography: an examination of geography from Antiquity to the 1950s, with a special focus on human/environment relation. Geography 1950-1980: a critical review of the development of geography as a spatial science. Paradigms and Revolutions: an analysis of paradigm shifts in geography, introducing students to key debates in the philosophy of science. Positivism and its Critics: a detailed discussion of positivism, critical theory, humanistic geography, behavioural geography, and structuralism. New Trends and Ideas developing critical responses: structuration theory, realism, post-structuralism, post-modernism, feminism and actor-network theory. This text explores complex ideas in an intelligible and accessible style. Illustrated throughout with research examples and explanations in text boxes, questions for discussion at the end of each chapter and a concept glossary, this is the essential student companion to the discipline.
This book cogently examines how human geography has developed from a field with limited self-awareness regarding method and theory to the vibrant study of society and space that it is today. Kevin R. Cox provides an interpretive, critical perspective on Anglo-American geographic thought in the 20th and 21st centuries. He probes the impact of the spatial-quantitative revolution and geography's engagement with other social sciences, particularly in social theory. Key concepts and theories in the field are explained and illustrated with instructive research examples. Cox explores both how new approaches to human geography get constructed and what each school of thought has contributed to understanding the world in which we live.
"Key Concepts in Urban Studies is written in an accessible, concise way and introduces students to the key topics in urban studies. Drawing examples from different parts of the world, this authoritative resource exposes students to the diverse forms that cities take, and the social, spatial and temporal dimensions of urban living. It is an essential resource for students across disciplines interested in the city." - Lily Kong, Singapore Management University "An insightful multidisciplinary introduction to the multifarious places, processes and problems that constitute modern cities. Its short, digestible entries unpack the complexity and evolution of urban conditions, offering cross-references between concepts and links to key literature and to useful current and historical examples. The book’s clear, often sharp critical edge also encourages deeper enquiry." - Quentin Stevens, School of Architecture and Design, RMIT University Key Concepts in Urban Studies is an essential companion for students of urban studies, urban sociology, urban politics, urban planning and urban development. This revised edition has been updated and expanded to provide a keen global focus, particularly in emerging economies with discussions on the creation of “dream cities” in the Gulf States and a renewed emphasis on building mega-scaled “downtowns” in India and China. New features include: Contemporary and international examples throughout. Detailed entries on environmental concerns and the sustainability of urban development. Discussion of the role of consumption in city culture and urban development. New entries on modern urban planning and adaptive urbanism. Key Concepts in Urban Studies is a must-have text with an explicit focus on contemporary urbanism which students will find invaluable during their studies. Mark Gottdiener is Professor Emeritus of Sociology at The University at Buffalo (SUNY). Leslie Budd is Reader in Social Science at the Open University. Panu Lehtovuori is Professor of Planning Theory at Tampere University of Technology.

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