Kinfolk is a slow lifestyle magazine that explores ways for readers to simplify their lives, cultivate community and spend more time with their friends and family. It is the place to discover new things to cook, make and do. Drawing upon a vibrant contributor base from Kyoto to Copenhagen to Cape Town, the spring 2017 issue of Kinfolk examines the nuances of free time, its rituals and rhythms and its capacity to reinvigorate.
Kinfolk is a slow lifestyle magazine that explores ways for readers to simplify their lives, cultivate community and spend more time with their friends and family. It is the place to discover new things to cook, make and do. The fall issue of Kinfolk explores one of life's simplest pleasures: sharing a meal. The act of eating together - whether at a well-appointed table or in the simple breaking of bread - is an essential element of a well-lived life. As MFK Fisher famously wrote, sharing a meal can be more intimate than sharing a bed. In this issue, we examine the role of food in forming and sustaining relationships, its place in art and political history, and its significance to the arbiters contemporary culture. We visit a breadmaker in her Brooklyn studio, test a curated selection of recipes by a celebrated chef, thumb the pages of Dali's surrealist cookbook and revisit MFK Fisher's seminal writing on the joy of simple meals.
This winter edition of Kinfolk—The Aged Issue—is dedicated to all things that get better with time: loved ones, food, family traditions and a good bottle of wine. The Kinfolk team explores how the older folks in our lives can teach us how to live more fully and how to embrace each new candle on our cake with style and grace. As some anonymous old chap once said, “Age is an issue of mind over matter. If you don’t mind, it doesn’t matter.” While many magazines pressure readers to hang on to youth, Kinfolk investigates how our lives are enriched by the people, meals and traditions of things past. One writer considers the inevitable day you realize you’re turning into your mother, while another reflects on the way life—like fruit—is about picking that perfectly ripe moment. Chefs share family recipes they’ve perfected over time, classic recipes updated for the modern era and a holiday menu that's easy to chew. There are gray hairs and salt-and-pepper beards, napping tips and ancient culinary tools. The connection? Everything in this issue gets better, or tastier, with age. Kinfolk is a place to discover new things to cook, make and do. Our growing international community is generous when it comes to sharing ideas for small gatherings, ways to take good care of friends and family and living a grounded, balanced lifestyle that is about connecting and conversation. Stunning photographs and colorful illustrations target individuals interested in recreational cooking and home entertaining. The collaborative style and content connects a growing demographic with creative individuals such as chefs, home cooks, designers, photographers and crafters, and encourages a laid-back approach to entertaining at home.
In The Kinfolk Entrepreneur, author Nathan Williams introduces readers to 40 creative business owners around the globe, offering an inspiring, in-depth look behind the scenes of their lives and their companies. Pairing insightful interviews with striking images of these men and women and their workspaces, The Kinfolk Entrepreneur makes business personal. The book profiles both budding and experienced entrepreneurs across a broad range of industries (from fashion designers to hoteliers) in cities across the globe (from Copenhagen to Dubai). Readers will learn how today’s industry leaders handle both their successes and failures, achieve work-life balance, find motivation in the face of adversity, and so much more.
Kinfolk is a slow lifestyle magazine that explores ways for readers to simplify their lives, cultivate community and spend more time with their friends and family. It is the place to discover new things to cook, make and do. The fall issue of Kinfolk explores one of life's simplest pleasures: sharing a meal. The act of eating together - whether at a well-appointed table or in the simple breaking of bread - is an essential element of a well-lived life. As MFK Fisher famously wrote, sharing a meal can be more intimate than sharing a bed. In this issue, we examine the role of food in forming and sustaining relationships, its place in art and political history, and its significance to the arbiters contemporary culture. We visit a breadmaker in her Brooklyn studio, test a curated selection of recipes by a celebrated chef, thumb the pages of Dali's surrealist cookbook and revisit MFK Fisher's seminal writing on the joy of simple meals.
The Winter Issue: This edition has a seasonal theme that brings the focus back to the magazine’s core goals, ideas and values. The issue will feature personal essays, simple recipes, uplifting photo essays and portraits of people living the good life. It also offers inspiration to do some indoor sparring; Professor Deane Curtin talking about eating in the moment; sculptures that show the way our bodies change when chilled; a visit to a hot spring; home tours in Copenhagen and Melbourne; a profile of a changing neighborhood in South East London; and something to inspire you while commuting. The issue contains a special themed section about Light, one of the most missed aspects of our winter days, with features on circadian rhythms, solstice traditions and the aurora borealis, along with profiles on artists and designers who work with light. Along with lots of things to cook, make and do, Kinfolk suggests ways to live a more creative, simple, connected life.
Kinfolk is a slow lifestyle magazine that explores ways for readers to simplify their lives, cultivate community and spend more time with their friends and family. It is the place to discover new things to cook, make and do. The growing international community is generous when it comes to sharing ideas for small gatherings and living a grounded, balanced lifestyle that is about connecting and making conversation.
Kinfolk is a slow lifestyle magazine that explores ways for readers to simplify their lives, cultivate community and spend more time with their friends and family. It is the place to discover new things to cook, make and do. The growing international community is generous when it comes to sharing ideas for small gatherings and living a grounded, balanced lifestyle that is about connecting and making conversation.
New York Times bestseller When The Kinfolk Table was published in 2013, it transformed the way readers across the globe thought about small gatherings. In this much-anticipated follow-up, Kinfolk founder Nathan Williams showcases how embracing that same ethos—of slowing down, simplifying your life, and cultivating community—allows you to create a more considered, beautiful, and intimate living space. The Kinfolk Home takes readers inside 35 homes around the world, from the United States, Scandinavia, Japan, and beyond. Some have constructed modern urban homes from blueprints, while others nurture their home’s long history. What all of these spaces have in common is that they’ve been put together carefully, slowly, and with great intention. Featuring inviting photographs and insightful profiles, interviews, and essays, each home tour is guaranteed to inspire.
The Entrepreneurs Issue: we explore the motivation and innovation that drives the spirit of entrepreneurship in our workplaces, as well as provide inspiration to balance our regular workdays with more leisure time. After all, we're all budding entrepreneurs in one way or another, whether we own a small business, have grand plans for starting one or just enjoy daydreaming about throwing caution to the wind to make donuts full-time. No matter if you're working in an artistic field as a maker and doer, crunching numbers or saving lives, creativity can be found in all our pursuits. While Kinfolk often focuses on the choices we make outside of work hours, this issue gives the same mindful attention to the time spent improving our professional selves. As mom would say, "If you love what you do, you'll never have to work another day in your life."
The Imperfect Issue: What is perfection, anyway? The Fall 2014 issue of Kinfolk explores the beauty of imperfection across food, people, ideas and more, showcasing the narratives these notions encompass. Nothing is perfect and it's often the most highly flawed things that give life its charm. So-called flaws should be embraced, diversity should be revered and eccentricity encouraged. The Imperfect Issue puts things society might deem rough around the edges under a microscope to explore their true character. Whether it's mismatched eyes, patched-up clothing or a broken plate, such unusual features often reveal lives lived to the fullest and rich with stories.
Kinfolk magazine—launched to great acclaim and instant buzz in 2011—is a quarterly journal about understated, unfussy entertaining. The journal has captured the imagination of readers nationwide, with content and an aesthetic that reflect a desire to go back to simpler times; to take a break from our busy lives; to build a community around a shared sensibility; and to foster the endless and energizing magic that results from sharing a meal with good friends. Now there’s The Kinfolk Table, a cookbook from the creators of the magazine, with profiles of 45 tastemakers who are cooking and entertaining in a way that is beautiful, uncomplicated, and inexpensive. Each of these home cooks—artisans, bloggers, chefs, writers, bakers, crafters—has provided one to three of the recipes they most love to share with others, whether they be simple breakfasts for two, one-pot dinners for six, or a perfectly composed sandwich for a solo picnic.
Wolf Haas' Detective Brenner series has become wildly popular around the world for a reason: They're timely, edgy stories told in a wry, quirky voice that's often hilarious, and with a protagonist it's hard not to love. In this episode, Brenner-forced out of the police force-tries to get away from detective work by taking a job as the personal chauffeur for two-year-old Helena, the daughter of a Munich construction giant and a Viennese abortion doctor. One day, while Brenner's attention is turned to picking out a chocolate bar for Helena at a gas station, Helena gets snatched from the car. Abruptly out of a job, Brenner decides to investigate her disappearance on his own. With both parents in the public eye, there's no scarcity of leads-the father's latest development project has spurred public protest, and the mother's clinic has been targeted by the zealous leader of an anti-abortion group. Brenner and God is told with a dark humor that leaves no character, including Brenner, unscathed. Haas tells the story of a fallible hero who can be indecisive and world-weary, baffled and disillusioned by what he finds, but who presses forward nonetheless out of a stubborn sense of decency-a two-year-old is kidnapped, so you find her, because that's just what you do.
Interrelating different locations and time frames, this volume discloses both the numerous analogies and fascinating differences which characterize the myths and realities of Chinatowns in Europe and the United States.
Simple Fare: Spring/Summer is a beautifully illustrated cookbook featuring seasonal, market-driven fare that encourages readers to cook simply and intuitively. Karen Mordechai of the acclaimed Brooklyn-based food community Sunday Suppers shares her meals for cooking at home and her studio. The recipes are designed to excite and inspire, each offering 3 to 5 alternate ingredients that can be used in the same preparation. A smoked beet panzanella with purple kale, radicchio and ricotta, for example, suggests a carrot, mizuna, watercress, and yogurt adaptation or tomato, arugula, purple basil, and burrata, allowing the reader flexibility depending on what is fresh at the market. The food is approachable but decidedly nuanced, balancing unexpected flavor profiles with beautiful presentations. With 68 recipes and 97 variations, Simple Fare is an oversize, distinctively designed kitchen essential of more than 165 seasonal recipes. This book is a valuable resource for avid cooks and beginners alike. Volume two of the series, Simple Fare: Fall/Winter will be available in September 2017.
The universe is not made of atoms; it's made of tiny stories. Featuring 82 contributors from the 35,905 contributions to the Tiny Stories collaboration on hitrecord.org
What is the meaning of blackness in Africa? While much has been written on Africa’s complex ethnic and tribal relationships, Jemima Pierre’s groundbreaking The Predicament of Blackness is the first book to tackle the question of race in West Africa through its postcolonial manifestations. Challenging the view of the African continent as a nonracialized space—as a fixed historic source for the African diaspora—she envisions Africa, and in particular the nation of Ghana, as a place whose local relationships are deeply informed by global structures of race, economics, and politics. Against the backdrop of Ghana’s history as a major port in the transatlantic slave trade and the subsequent and disruptive forces of colonialism and postcolonialism, Pierre examines key facets of contemporary Ghanaian society, from the pervasive significance of “whiteness” to the practice of chemical skin-bleaching to the government’s active promotion of Pan-African “heritage tourism.” Drawing these and other examples together, she shows that race and racism have not only persisted in Ghana after colonialism, but also that the beliefs and practices of this modern society all occur within a global racial hierarchy. In doing so, she provides a powerful articulation of race on the continent and a new way of understanding contemporary Africa—and the modern African diaspora.
Comprehensive in its coverage, The Womanist Reader is the first volume to anthologize the major works of womanist scholarship. Charting the course of womanist theory from its genesis as Alice Walker’s African-American feminism, through Chikwenye Okonjo Ogunyemi’s African womanism and Clenora Hudson-Weems’ Africana womanism, to its present-day expression as a global, anti-oppressionist perspective rooted in the praxis of everyday women of color, this interdisciplinary reader traces the rich and diverse history of a quarter century of womanist thought. Featuring selections from over a dozen disciplines by top womanist scholars from around the world, plus several critiques of womanism, an extensive bibliography of womanist sources, and the first ever systematic treatment of womanist thought on its own terms, Layli Phillips has assembled a unique and groundbreaking compilation.

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