Walk the galleries of any major contemporary art museum and you are sure to see a work by a Korean artist. Interest in modern and contemporary art from South—as well as North—Korea has grown in recent decades, and museums and individual collectors have been eager to tap into this rising market. But few books have helped us understand Korean art and its significance in the art world, and even fewer have told the story of the formation of Korea’s contemporary cultural scene and the role artists have played in it. This richly illustrated history tackles these issues, exploring Korean art from the late-nineteenth century to the present day—a period that has seen enormous political, social, and economic change. Charlotte Horlyck covers the critical and revolutionary period that stretches from Korean artists’ first encounters with oil paintings in the late nineteenth century to the varied and vibrant creative outputs of the twenty-first. She explores artists’ interpretations of new and traditional art forms ranging from oil and ink paintings to video art, multi-media installations, ready-mades, and performance art, showing how artists at every turn have questioned the role of art and artists within society. Opening up this fascinating world to general audiences, this book will appeal to anyone wanting to explore this rich and fascinating era in Korea’s cultural history.
Walk the galleries of any major contemporary art museum and you are sure to see a work by a Korean artist. Interest in modern and contemporary art from South—as well as North—Korea has grown in recent decades, and museums and individual collectors have been eager to tap into this rising market. But few books have helped us understand Korean art and its significance in the art world, and even fewer have told the story of the formation of Korea’s contemporary cultural scene and the role artists have played in it. This richly illustrated history tackles these issues, exploring Korean art from the late-nineteenth century to the present day—a period that has seen enormous political, social, and economic change. Charlotte Horlyck covers the critical and revolutionary period that stretches from Korean artists’ first encounters with oil paintings in the late nineteenth century to the varied and vibrant creative outputs of the twenty-first. She explores artists’ interpretations of new and traditional art forms ranging from oil and ink paintings to video art, multi-media installations, ready-mades, and performance art, showing how artists at every turn have questioned the role of art and artists within society. Opening up this fascinating world to general audiences, this book will appeal to anyone wanting to explore this rich and fascinating era in Korea’s cultural history.
This engaging text provides a concise history of Korea from the beginning of human settlement in the region through the late nineteenth century. Its thorough chronological narrative equally emphasizes social, cultural, and political history. Students will be especially drawn to descriptions of everyday life for both elite and nonelite members of society during various historical periods. A Concise History of Korea emphasizes how Korean history can be understood as part of an interactive sphere that includes three basic areas: China, Japan, and the Manchurian/Central Asian region. Throughout the book, comparisons are drawn between developments in Korea and those in neighboring regions, especially China and Japan. Michael Seth synthesizes recent scholarship to provide a straightforward understanding of Korean history, also addressing important historiographical issues in an accessible, nontechnical manner. Historical maps illustrate the changes in the region over time. The annotated bibliography of works in English is a useful addition for students, who will find this book to be a clear and comprehensive Korean history.
A crucial artistic movement of twentieth-century Korea, Tansaekhwa (monochromatic painting) also became one of its most famous and successful. In this full-color, richly illustrated account—the first of its kind in English—Joan Kee provides a fresh interpretation of the movement's emergence and meaning that sheds new light on the history of abstraction, twentieth-century Asian art, and contemporary art in general.
Presents photographs of 124 Korean pieces housed in the Victoria and Albert Museum, including ceramics from every major dynasty, metalwork, textiles, furniture, and screens and paintings from 2000 years of Korean art-making
Modern and Contemporary Art in Korea deals with issues of tradition, modernity, and identity in modern and contemporary Korean art in Korea. On a deeper level, this is one of the only books of its kind in English that exposes readers to specific artists and their works, an especially useful resource for those who wish to know more than just surface level facts about Korean art.
The rapid development of Korean cinema during the decades of the 1960s and 2000s reveals a dynamic cinematic history which runs parallel to the nation’s political, social, economic and cultural transformation during these formative periods. This book examines the ways in which South Korean cinema has undergone a transformation from an antiquated local industry in the 1960s into a thriving international cinema in the 21st century. It investigates the circumstances that allowed these two eras to emerge as creative watersheds, and demonstrates the forces behind Korea’s positioning of itself as an important contributor to regional and global culture, and especially its interplay with Japan, Greater China, and the United States. Beginning with an explanation of the understudied operations of the film industry during its 1960s take-off, it then offers insight into the challenges that producers, directors, and policy makers faced in the 1970s and 1980s during the most volatile part of Park Chung-hee’s authoritarian rule and the subsequent Chun Doo-hwan military government. It moves on to explore the film industry’s professionalization in the 1990s and subsequent international expansion in the 2000s. In doing so, it explores the nexus and tensions between film policy, producing, directing, genre, and the internationalization of Korean cinema over half a century. By highlighting the recent transnational turn in national cinemas, this book underscores the impact of developments pioneered by Korean cinema on the transformation of ‘Planet Hallyuwood’. It will be of particular interest to students and scholars of Korean Studies and Film Studies.
Despite its relatively small size, Korea has perhaps the most sophisticated contemporary art scene in Asia. In recent years, its vibrancy has been lighting up the whole world, with artists such as Do Ho Suh, Kimsooja, Michael Joo and Koo Jeong-A emerging as major players on the international art scene. This book profiles these and many other acclaimed figures as well as of such up-and-coming artists as Lee Yong Baek, Jeon Joohno, Moon Kyungwon and Nikki S. Lee.
Mount Geumgang, also known as the Diamond Mountains, is perhaps the most famous and emotionally resonant site on the Korean Peninsula, a magnificent range of rocky peaks, waterfalls, and lagoons, dotted with pavilions and temples. Since ancient times, it has inspired cultural pride, spurred spiritual and artistic pilgrimages, and engendered an outpouring of creative expression. Yet since the partition of Korea in 1945 situated it in the North, Mount Geumgang has remained largely inaccessible to visitors, shrouded in legend, loss, and longing. p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 14.0px Verdana} Diamond Mountains: Travel and Nostalgia in Korean Art is the first book in English to explore the pictorial representations of this grand and varied landscape. The special exhibition it accompanies, organized by Soyoung Lee, Curator in the Department of Asian Art, examines the evolution of Diamond Mountains imagery from the golden age of Korean true-view painting in the eighteenth century to the present day. Even today, when a profusion of Instagram photos can make the world’s most obscure sites and geographical oddities seem familiar, the Diamond Mountains portrayed here in album leaves, scrolls, and screens will be a revelation to many.
The first major exhibition in the United States of chaekgeori painting, including on view for the first time many screens from private collections and various Korean institutions.
Without question, the tache (blot, patch, stain) is a central and recurring motif in nineteenth-century modernist painting. Manet's and the Impressionists? rejection of academic finish produced a surface where the strokes of paint were presented directly, as patches or blots, then indirectly as legible signs. C?nne, Seurat, and Signac painted exclusively with patches or dots. Through a series of close readings, this book looks at the tache as one of the most important features in nineteenth-century modernism. The tache is a potential meeting point between text and image and a pure trace of the artist?s body. Even though each manifestation of tacheism generates its own specific cultural effects, this book represents the first time a scholar has looked at tacheism as a hidden continuum within modern art. With a methodological framework drawn from the semiotics of text and image, the author introduces a much-needed fine-tuning to the classic terms index, symbol, and icon. The concept of the tache as a ?crossing? of sign-types enables finer distinctions and observations than have been available thus far within the Peircean tradition. The ?sign-crossing? theory opens onto the whole terrain of interaction between visual art, art criticism, literature, philosophy, and psychology.
This Korean art book is an exploration of the Joseon Dynasty. In Korea, life milestones have traditionally been celebrated with festivals and feasts. Such celebrations helped to define and honor an individual's identity. In Grand Style presents rare and exquisite objects drawn from some ten museums in Korea. Highlights include a ten-panel folding screen of Celebrations on the Crown Prince's Birth from 1874, a portrait of Emperor Gojong from 1897, a Royal Procession to the Royal Tomb at Hwaseong from 1795, and kings' thrones and palanquins. The book documents Korea's taste for splendor and grandeur. It explores the meaning and obligations of kingship, the elite culture of the court and the upper class during the Joseon dynasty (1392-1910), and the complex roles of women in organizing and presenting elaborate celebrations, in the grandest of styles.
Should sight trump the other four senses when experiencing and evaluating art? Art, History and the Senses: 1830 to the Present questions whether the authority of the visual in 'visual culture' should be deconstructed, and focuses on the roles of touch, taste, smell, and sound in the materiality of works of art. From the nineteenth century onward, notions of synaesthesia and the multi-sensorial were important to a series of art movements from Symbolism to Futurism and Installations. The essays in this collection evaluate works of art at specific moments in their history, and consider how senses other than the visual have (or have not) affected the works' meaning. The result is a re-evaluation of sensory knowledge and experience in the arts, encouraging a new level of engagement with ideas of style and form.
Repainting the work of another into one?s own canvas is a deliberate and often highly fraught act of reuse. This book examines the creation, display, and reception of such images. Artists working in nineteenth-century London were in a peculiar position: based in an imperial metropole, yet undervalued by their competitors in continental Europe. Many claimed that Britain had yet to produce a viable national school of art. Using pictures-within-pictures, British painters challenged these claims and asserted their role in an ongoing visual tradition. By transforming pre-existing works of art, they also asserted their own painterly abilities. Recognizing these statements provided viewers with pleasure, in the form of a witty visual puzzle solved, and with prestige, in the form of cultural knowledge demonstrated. At stake for both artist and audience in such exchanges was status: the status of the painter relative to other artists, and the status of the viewer relative to other audience members. By considering these issues, this book demonstrates a new approach to images of historic displays. Through examinations of works by J.M.W. Turner, John Everett Millais, John Scarlett Davis, Emma Brownlow King, and William Powell Frith, this book reveals how these small passages of paint conveyed both personal and national meanings.
With deft portraits of many world figures, Dean Acheson analyzes the processes of policy making, the necessity for decision, and the role of power and initiative in matters of state. Acheson (1893-1971) was not only present at the creation of the postwar world, he was one of its chief architects. He joined the Department of State in 1941 as Assistant Secretary of State for Economic Affairs and, with brief intermissions, was continuously involved until 1953, when he left office as Secretary of State at the end of the Truman years. Throughout that time Acheson's was one of the most influential minds and strongest wills at work. It was a period that included World War II, the reconstruction of Europe, the Korean War, the development of nuclear power, the formation of the United Nations and NATO. It involved him at close quarters with a cast that starred Truman, Roosevelt, Churchill, de Gaulle, Marshall, MacArthur, Eisenhower, Attlee, Eden Bevin, Schuman, Dulles, de Gasperi, Adenauer, Yoshida, Vishinsky, and Molotov.
Education has significant and far-reaching effects not only on individuals, but also on the societies in which they live and to which they contribute. The education level of a population affects how a country supports itself and others and the degree to which it can participate in the global field. While everyone from politicians to policymakers to celebrities has stressed the importance of education, there has not been-until now-a vigorous yet comprehensible examination of data to support what has long been common knowledge: education matters. In Education Matters: Global Gains from the 19th to the 21st Century, renowned economists Robert Barro and Jong-Wha Lee present a revolutionary new data set on education in 146 countries since 1870 and projected through 2040. With case studies from the United States, China, and Korea, Barro and Lee evaluate schooling both quantitatively and qualitatively and assess the role of education in political development. The book also addresses sensitive and controversial topics, such as international disparities in education and the role of education in modernization and development. Both challenging and enlightening,Education Matters has exciting implications for the future of education and promises to be a ground-breaking work in the fields of economics and educational attainment. In this comprehensive study, Barro and Lee establish the critical role that education plays - particularly for women and girls - in economic growth, fertility, and democracy. Engaging and informative,Education Matters is a compelling read for students, scholars, and anyone with a passion for education.
What we know of war is always mediated knowledge and feeling. We need lenses to filter out some of its blinding, terrifying light. These lenses are not fixed; they change over time, and Jay Winter's panoramic history of war and memory offers an unprecedented study of transformations in our imaginings of war, from 1914 to the present. He reveals the ways in which different creative arts have framed our meditations on war, from painting and sculpture to photography, film and poetry, and ultimately to silence, as a language of memory in its own right. He shows how these highly mediated images of war, in turn, circulate through language to constitute our 'cultural memory' of war. This is a major contribution to our understanding of the diverse ways in which men and women have wrestled with the intractable task of conveying what twentieth-century wars meant to them and mean to us.
A richly illustrated survey of the vast influence of Korea's longest-ruling Confucian dynasty, featuring some 200 masterworks from major collections
This edited collection reassesses East-Central European art by offering transnational perspectives on its regional or national histories, while also inserting the region into contemporary discussions of global issues. Both in popular imagination and, to some degree, scholarly literature, East-Central Europe is persistently imagined as a hermetically isolated cultural landscape. This book restores the diverse ways in which East-Central European art has always been entangled with actors and institutions in the wider world. The contributors engage with empirically anchored and theoretically argued case studies from historical periods representing notable junctures of globalization: the early modern period, the age of Empires, the time of socialist rule and the global Cold War, and the most recent decades of postsocialism understood as a global condition.

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