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This volume seeks to enable language and education practitioners and researchers to get a sense of the range of issues being pursued in language and education research and the array of methods employed to do so. It focuses on language and education in relation to society, variation, culture, and interaction. Its unity of purpose and outlook with regard to the central role of language as both vehicle and mediator of educational processes and to the need for continued and deepening research into the limits and possibilities that implies is most impressive.
The first critical ethnography of bilingual education in Japan. Based on fieldwork at five different schools, this examines the role of schools in the unequal distribution of bilingualism as cultural capital. It argues that schooling gives children unequal access to bilingualism thus socializing them into different futures.
Language issues are intrinsically part of every classroom setting. Therefore, there is a need to present the linguistic perspective to all teachers and teachers-in-training. This perspective assumes that people internally organize language at different levels, each with its own set of organizing principles, and proposes that this complex system is learned by children at an early age and with little conscious instruction. It recognizes that languages change over time and that variation, based on region, ethnic identity, gender, social class, and social context, is inherent to language. Focusing more on the practical than the theoretical, Barry aims to engage teachers and education students in discussion of the relevance of linguistics to teaching and to encourage them to bring their own expertise to the discussion.
International perspectives on intercultural learning are presented within a framework of cultures of learning related to education and language learning and use in academic contexts. Intercultural learning involves learners travelling to learn in a place where other cultures of learning are dominant and to which they are usually expected to adapt.
This book examines new functional approaches to language and education, and the impact of these on literacy in the classroom. The first section looks at issues of multimodality, in which the definition of a text is expanded to include not only that which is written down, but also the interaction of writing, graphics, and audiovisual material. The contributors explores ways in which language education can be expanded to deal with multimodal discourse, whether in children's books, in textbooks, or on the web. The second section looks at how critical discourse analysis and appraisal theory can be used as tools for assessing the effectiveness of student writing and literacy achievement, and also for helping developing writers to write more successfully. The final section argues that corpus-based studies of language have changed the way we see language, and that the way we teach language should evolve in line with these changes. This appealing survey of new directions in language and education includes contributions from internationally renowned scholars. It will be of interest to researchers in systemic functional linguistics, or language and education.
This book, addressed to experienced and novice language educators, provides an up-to-date overview of sociolinguistics, reflecting changes in the global situation and the continuing evolution of the field and its relevance to language education around the world. Topics covered include nationalism and popular culture, style and identity, creole languages, critical language awareness, gender and ethnicity, multimodal literacies, classroom discourse, and ideologies and power. Whether considering the role of English as an international language or innovative initiatives in Indigenous language revitalization, in every context of the world sociolinguistic perspectives highlight the fluid and flexible use of language in communities and classrooms, and the importance of teacher practices that open up spaces of awareness and acceptance of --and access to--the widest possible communicative repertoire for students.
This is the second volume of a series of eight volumes together entitled Encyclopedia of Language and Education. It attempts to overview an area which has recently emerged, and draws on some 25 state-of-the-art reviews of current concerns in the study of literacy prepared by leading writers and researchers.
In this updated edition of the landmark original volume, a range of international experts present a comprehensive overview of the field of deaf studies, language, and education. Written for students, practitioners, and researchers, The Oxford Handbook of Deaf Studies, Language, and Education, Volume 1, is a uniquely ambitious work that has altered both the theoretical and applied landscapes.
The present volume seeks to enable language and education practitioners, researchers, and interested lay readers alike to get a sense of the range of issues being pursued in language and education research and the array of methods employed to do so. A major assumption of the volume is that both micro and macro perspectives and both social and linguistic levels of analysis are critical for an understanding of the interaction between language and education. It is organized in four parts, focusing in turn on language and education in relation to society, variation, culture, and interaction. The contributing scholars hail from five continents and nine countries; they represent a great diversity of linguistic, cultural, and disciplinary traditions. For all that, what is most impressive about this volume is the unity of purpose and outlook with regard to the central role of language as both vehicle and mediator of educational processes and to the need for continued and deepening research into the limits and possibilities that implies.
This volume brings together seven studies, written by experts in the field, that deal with the most important features of native Canadian language education: the relation of language to culture; the kinds of curricular approaches best suited to aboriginal languages; the optimal pattern of relationship between teacher and learner; the linguistic characteristics of the learner; and the role of communication in language study.
"This book is about language and education in Eritrea, Eritrea is independent since 1991 and, consisting of different ethnolinguistic groups, is an intriguing example of a country that is facing the complex interdependencies of language, social mobility, ethnicity, and nationalism. It is special in the sense that it, unlike many other postcolonial African countries, in its Declaration of Policies in Education in 1991 explicitly decided for a policy of mother-tongue education in terms of the use of ethnic group languages as languages of instruction in primary education." "This study consists of three interconnected studies dealing with language policy, language diversity, and language use in education. The first study is a critical analysis of the present Eritrean language policy, its ideology, and its influence on education. The second is a sociolinguistic survey in which home and school language profiles of 359 primary school pupils of different ethnic groups all over the country are mapped. The last study is ethnographic in nature. It investigates the way in which language diversity in Eritrea is reflected in the interaction between teachers and pupils in primary school classrooms in which the language of instruction is either the mother tongue of the pupils or a second or third language."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Titles in the Class, Race and Social Structure set of the International Library of Sociology consider every problem of socio-political importance that affected society in the years following the Second World War.
This is the second volume of the Encyclopedia of Language and Education (8 vols). It draws on some 25 state-of-the-art reviews of current concerns in the study of literacy prepared by an international group of leading writers and researchers. It emphasizes the impact of globalization on our understanding of literacy. The approach is multidisciplinary, drawing on insights from fields as diverse as anthropology and computer science, sociolinguistics and psychology.
Daisaku Ikeda (b. 1928) is an international Buddhist leader, peacebuilder, prolific author, and the founder of the secular Soka kindergartens, elementary and secondary schools, women’s college and universities in seven countries across Asia and the Americas. He has emerged as an important educational philosopher and practitioner whose perspectives on dialogue, value-creation (soka), global citizenship, and the deep inner transformation he calls "human revolution" have informed the curriculum and instruction of thousands of teachers not only at the Soka schools, but also at numerous non-Soka schools and universities around the world. This volume brings together, for the first time in English, international scholars’ empirical and theoretical analyses of Ikeda’s contributions to language and education in a global context. This book was awarded the Critics Choice Book Award by the American Educational Studies Association in 2015. This book was originally published as a special issue of Critical Inquiry in Language Studies.

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