Jacques Henri Lartigue (1894-1986) was the best-known "amateur" in the history of photography, famously discovered by the art world and given an exhibi­tion at MoMA in New York when he was in his late sixties. He began by recording the pastimes and customs of his wealthy Parisian milieu, indulging his fascination with sports and aviation, and throughout his long life he was never without his camera. His friendships extended to the superstars of French culture, but he also made thousands of photographs of his family, wives, and lovers. His work was irresistibly warm and engaging. Although known for his black-and-white work, Lartigue loved color film, experimenting with the Autochrome process in the teens and twenties and embracing Ektachrome in the late 1940s. His color work, reproduced here for the first time, is astonishingly fresh: the French countryside, the women in his life, famous friends (Picasso, Fellini), and glimpses from his travels all come alive in this delightful book.
Jacques Henri Lartigue was fascinated by the ascent of sport in the early twentieth century as a fashionable pastime for the middle classes, and was himself a keen sportsman. Lartigue's entirely unposed photographs, presented album-style in this gorgeous, luxurious and delightful volume, capture both the joyous exuberance of amateur sports--racing, skiing, tennis, gymnastics, hang gliding--and the particular character of its popularity in the first half of the twentieth century. Lartigue is an absolute master at conveying the dynamism of the human body at play--the peculiar shapes it can contort into, and the gestures that can express anything from easy nonchalance to fierce focus. These photographs also serve as a historical catalogue of the paraphernalia and smart casual clothing associated with each sport. A Sporting Life is divided into five themed chapters: "The Sportsman," "Taking the Air," "Training," "Women and Children" and "Sport as Spectacle." Here, we witness how sports were transforming social relations, introducing new opportunities for expression, especially across gender lines. In an essay, historian Thierry Terret reveals the complexity of Lartigue's technical approach to photography, and looks at the issues surrounding the rise of sport in its modern incarnation as a leisure pursuit and as commerce. In a preface, novelist Anne-Marie Garat (whose own narratives often feature the themes of photography and family) provides a personal perspective on Lartigue's sports photography, also exploring the role played by sport in the development of photography itself. The book is copublished with Hermès, in celebration of its 2013 sports theme. Jacques Henri Lartigue (1894-1986) was a French photographer and painter, most famous for his photographs of the leisure activities of France's middle and upper classes. An avid photographer from the age of seven, Lartigue gained fame for his photo albums, which provide a comprehensive chronicle of the twentieth century in France and abroad, and for his official portraits.
Photographs of inter-war European society dressed to play at Chamonix, St. Moritz, Megeve.
Jacques-Henri Lartigue (1894-1986), celebrated photographer, and one of the greatest practitioners the medium has ever known, discovered the Riviera with his first camera in the company of his wealthy family when he was just eleven years old. For the rest of his life Lartigue was a regular visitor to the Cote d'Azur, taking many of his finest pictures in Nice, Cannes, Cap d'Ail, Antibes, Menton, and Monaco. This splendid volume is the first book, to bring together a large selection of these photographs which are accompanied by a lively, informative text. Not only did Lartigue document the elegant resort life of the leisure class of which he was a member-in the villas, hotels, beach clubs, and casinos where they lived and played-but he also created an intimate chronicle of the life he shared on he Riviera with his beautiful first wife Bibi, during the 1920s, his companion Renee Perle, in 1930-31, and Florette whom he married in 1942. Apart from the stunning black-and-white images for which Lartigue is celebrated-including his ground-breaking panoramic photographs of the coastline-Lartigue's Riviera also reveals an important group of little-known and rarely published color photographs. The world ski-jumping championships in Juan-les-Pins, filming Les Aventures du roi Pausole in Cap d'Antibes, the Ziegfeld Follies girls in Monte Carlo, alternate here with the daily life of Latigue and his friends-stopping for lunch in St. Tropez, exercising on the beach in Cannes, drinking an aperitif at sunset at Cap d'Ail. Among the most beautiful-and often funny and poignant-photographs ever taken, Lartigue's pictures of the Riviera will come as a revelation to those who will be discovering them for the first time, and as a welcome glimpse of the sunlight and glamour for which he is so admired by his devoted fans.
Jacques Henri Lartigue (1884-1986) took his first photograph using his father's camera when he was six years old, and with this began the creation of an enduring record of 20th-century French life.
"Copublished with the Milwaukee Art Museum on the occasion of the exhibition, Color rush: 75 years of color photography in America, on view February 22 to May 19, 2013."--Colophon.
René Burri’s photographs are recognized the world-over as amongst the greatest of the twentieth century. From his iconic shots of Che Guevara and Brasilia, his sensitive war reportage across the globe, to his insightful portraits of such artistic figures as Pablo Picasso and Le Corbusier, Burri’s visual world has shaped our perception of history and politics. Now, for the first time, he invites us to view his selection from his archive of colour photographs, taken throughout his career, and tells the stories behind the photographs.
Witty, playful, and effortlessly chic, "Inge Morath: On Style" reveals the vital forms of fashion and self-expression that blossomed into existence in England, France, and the United States in the postwar decades. The book follows the photojournalist Inge Morath (1923 2002) through intimate sessions with Ingrid Bergman and Audrey Hepburn; scenes of window-shopping on Fifth Avenue; American girls discovering Paris; the frenetic splendor of society balls; and working women from actresses to seamstresses to writers everywhere taking their place in the world. The photographs in "On Style" focus on an extraordinary period of Morath s creativity, from the early 1950s to mid- 1960s, with a coda of work from later years. Here are the fundamental humanism, joy, and unerring eye for life s brilliant theatricality that characterized her work and made her one of the most celebrated photographers of her time."
Louis Lumière is perhaps best known in the U.S. for his seminal role in the invention of cinema, but his most important contribution to the history of photography was the autochrome. Engagingly written and marvelously illustrated with over 300 images, The Lumière Autochrome: History, Technology, and Preservation tells the fascinating story of the first industrially produced form of color photography. Initial chapters present the Lumière family enterprise, set out the challenges posed by early color photography, and recount the invention, rise, and eventual decline of the autochrome, which for the first four decades of the twentieth century was the most widely used form of commercial color photography. The book then treats the technology of the autochrome, including the technical challenges of plate fabrication, described in step-by-step detail, and a thorough account of autochrome manufacture. A long final chapter provides in-depth recommendations concerning the preservation of these vulnerable objects, including proper storage and display guidelines. There are also engaging portfolios throughout the book showcasing autochrome photographs from around the world as part of an initiative founded by the French banker Albert Kahn, as well as engrossing testimonials by children of men who worked in the Lumière factories in the early twentieth century. The appendix includes transcriptions and facsimile reproductions from the Lumière notebooks as well as original patent documents.
The work of American photographer Dave Heath (b. 1931) stuns with its emotional potency. Exploring themes of loneliness and alienation in modern society, Heath's photographs depict strangers riding the train, watching a Thanksgiving parade, staring pensively at their dining room table, or kissing on the side of a street. Entirely self-taught, Heath stretches the boundaries of the medium and explores the potential of the photo-narrative--through handmade book maquettes, innovative multimedia slide presentations, and other photographic experimentations. This is the first comprehensive survey of Heath's deeply personal work, focusing on his astounding contributions to black-and-white photography. These images span the first 20 years of his career, 1949 to 1969, and many of them are previously unpublished. Filling a major gap in scholarship, the catalogue surveys the most groundbreaking facets of Heath's creative work and highlights its historical importance. Heath's art is ripe for rediscovery, and this book reaffirms his status as a key figure in 20th-century American photography.
An accessible overview of the work of legendary American photographer Irving Penn
The fruit of fantastic recent discoveries from Saul Leiter's vast archive, In My Room provides an in-depth study of the nude, through intimate photographs of the women Leiter knew. Showing deeply personal interior spaces, often illuminated by the lush natural light of the artist's studio in New York City's East Village, these black-and-white images reveal a unique type of collaboration between Leiter and his subjects. In the 1970s Leiter planned to make a book of nudes, but the project was never realized in his lifetime. Now, we get a first-time look at this body of work, which was begun on Leiter's arrival in New York in 1946 and honed over the next two decades. Leiter, who was also a painter, allows abstract elements into the photographs and often shows the influence of his favorite artists, including Bonnard, Vuillard and Matisse. Leiter, who painted and took pictures prolifically up to his death, worked in relative obscurity until he entered his eighties. He preferred to be left alone, and resisted any type of explanation or analysis of his work. With In My Room, Leiter ushers viewers into his private world while retaining his strong sense of mystery. Saul Leiter was born in Pittsburgh in 1923. In 1946 he moved to New York to become a painter, but was encouraged to pursue photography by the photographic experimentation and influence of his friend, the Abstract Expressionist Richard Pousette-Dart. Leiter subsequently enjoyed a successful career as a fashion photographer spanning three decades, and his images were published in magazines such as Esquire, Harper's Bazaar, Elle and British Vogue. His work is held in many prestigious private and public collections, including The Museum of Modern Art, New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Victoria and Albert Museum. Leiter died in November 2013.
"Saul Leiter's early black and white photographs are as innovative and challenging as his highly regarded early work in color. Breaking with the documentary tradition, Leiter responded to the dynamic street life of New York City with a spontaneity and openness that resulted in vibrant, impressionistic images that have the immediacy of an accomplished artist's sketch. With his unconventional framing and nuanced use of light, shadow and tone, Leiter created images with a lyrical subtlety like no other photographer of his era, and brought the same sensibility to his intimate and frank portrayals of family members and friends. Early Black and White shows the impressive range of Leiter's early photography."--Slipcase.
"Although he is recognized almost exclusively as a master of black-and-white photography, Capa began working regularly with color film in 1941 and used it until his death in 1954. Some of this work was published in the great picture magazines of the day, but the majority of these images have never been printed or seen in any form. While he did use color for some early World War II stories, Capa's use of color film exploded in his postwar stories. These photographs brought the lives of ordinary and exotic people from around the world to American and European readers alike, and were markedly different from the war reportage that had dominated Capa's early career. In the late 1940s, Capa traveled to the USSR, Budapest, and Israel to cover postwar life. Capa's technical ability coupled with his engagement with human emotion in his prewar black-and-white stories enabled him to move easily between black and white and color film. Capa's photographs also provided readers a glimpse into more glamorous lifestyles that depended on the allure and seduction of color photography. In 1950, he covered fashionable ski resorts in the Swiss, Austrian, and French Alps, and the stylish French resorts of Biarritz and Deauville for the burgeoning travel market capitalized on by Holiday magazine. He even tried fashion photography by the banks of the Seine and on the Place Vendome. Through his friendships with many actors, Capa photographed Ingrid Bergman, Humphrey Bogart, Orson Welles, and John Huston, among others, in intimate moments on European film sets. Capa in Color will explore how he started to see anew with color film and how his work adapted to a new postwar sensibility. The new medium required him to readjust to color compositions, but also to a postwar audience, interested in being entertained and transported to new places"--Provided by publisher.
A collaboration between a photographer intrigued by the evolution of photography and her friend Ricardo, both her muse and her model. Balet became profoundly interested in what it is that gives a photograph its iconic status. Ricardo’s golden shoes walk from one world to another tracing a considered and thoughtful route through 176 years of photographic history.

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