Four kids and their sidekick, Petey the parrot, run a sometimes thriving lemonade stand whose patrons include all kinds of wacky neighbors—even a juggler. They create a bar graph to track the rise and fall of their lemonade sales. Illustrator Tricia Tusa has imbued the story with her delightful sense of humor and has made understanding bar graphs a breeze.
Beginning readers are introduced to bar graphs as a group of children and their pet parrot go into business selling lemonade and keep a bar graph to track their sales. Simultaneous.
Carlos pours cups, pints and quarts of water into his fish bowl, getting ready for his new puppy, Ripley. Readers can learn about capacity as they see just how much water it takes to make room for Ripley!
Yee–hah! It's rodeo time! Bareback bronc riding, barrel racing, calf roping, the livestock show, the fiddling contest, and don't forget lunch –– how are Katie and Cameron going to fit it all in and still have time to help their uncle, Cactus Joe, with chores? By making a schedule, of course. But making a schedule and sticking to it turn out to be two very different things!
Perry the Penguin needs 9 clams to buy an ice scooter -- but he's not very good at saving. As Perry earns, spends, finds, loses, and borrows clams, a simple line graph demonstrates the concept of negative numbers.
Shark Swimathon The Ocean City Sharks have to swim 75 laps by the end of the week, and every day they figure out how many laps are left to go. Swimming and subtraction are all part of the fun!
Clever Coyote thinks it's time for lunch –– and also time to show her friends how, with some simple rounding, she can add up numbers in her head. If only she were as good at hunting as she is at math!
Frog friends, Matty and Moe, are off with a "Ready, Set, Hop!" They both made it to the rock, but who's in the lead? If Matty hopped 5 hops and Moe hopped 2 more hops than Matty, then the score is 5 to 7. But then they're off again. Any child who can add or subtract can build a simple equation, and Matty and Moe make it fun. As readers count along with Stuart J. Murphy and Jon Buller they will sharpen their problem solving skills and find out which frog is the better hopper.
Earth Day is on the way, and Ryan, Luke, and Carly have a plan. If they manage to collect and recycle 5,000 aluminum cans, they can make enough money to buy some beautiful flowers for nearby Gilroy Park. CAN they do it? Counting the cans gives Ryan, Luke, and Carly -- along with readers -- a lesson in place value. And facts about recycling throughout the story will help readers understand how important it is to take care of the earth.
Kangaroo is back! In this story he and his friends at camp divide into halves, thirds, and fourths to form teams at field day. Readers will cheer on this rowdy crew of Australian animals as they swim, canoe, play tug-of-war, and have a good, goofy time.
Blue Ribbon Blueberry Pie. If the bear cubs gather enough nuts, seeds and blueberries, Mama Bear has agreed to make her special, lip-smacking-good pie. Each time they fill their baskets, the cubs count berries, seeds and nuts by putting them in groups of tens and ones to see if they have enough for pie. Everyday activities such as sharing a meal, sorting socks and getting ready for school can be part of learning math. In the MathStart Series, everyday life is the basis for each entertaining story. Simple math concepts are embedded in each story so that young children can intuitively understand them. Adults can use the creative suggestions for activities in the back of each book to extend learning opportunities with children. Developmentally appropriate and correlated to school grade levels and the curriculum standards of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, MathStart can give children a head start!Blue Ribbon Blueberry Pie is the best—but do these bear cubs have enough ingredients to bake one? Regrouping their berries, nuts, and seeds by tens and ones reveals that one cub has not done her fair bear share. John Speirs's irresistible bear cubs make this lesson in regrouping one children will enjoy. Blue Ribbon Blueberry Pie is the best—but do these bear cubs have enough ingredients to bake one? Regrouping their berries, nuts, and seeds by tens and ones reveals that one cub has not done her fair bear share. John Speirs's irresistible bear cubs make this lesson in regrouping one children will enjoy.
With the help of her friends, Kate overcomes several obstacles and sells enough lemonade in the neighborhood park to buy her father a birthday present.
Josh is the best collector on the block. And now he has something new to collect - rocks! Soon Josh and his best friend, Amy, have so many rocks they need to organize their collection. But how? Young collectors will be fascinated by all there is to know about rocks and about classifying - sorting and organizing objects by attributes like color, shape, or size. Grab your rock hammer and join the fun with this entertaining story by Stuart J. Murphy and lively art by Cat Bowman Smith.
The O'Malleys are off to the beach! But it's a long, hot, boring drive. What can Eric, Bridget, and Nell do to keep busy? Play tally games, of course -- counting up all the gray cars or green T-shirts they see. Whoever has the most marks at the end wins the game. Eric wins the first game. Bridget wins the second. It seems like poor Nell will never win a game! But Nell has the luck of the Irish on her side, and a surprise in store for her big brother and sister.
Comparing whole numbers and understanding what's more and what's less are a big part of Eddie's strategy in guessing people's ages at the school fair. Full color.
Scream down the Dare-Devil Coaster and whirl around in the Twin Spin cars! Join in the carnival fun as 11 friends divide up to fit on the 2-to-a-seat roller coaster and the 4-to-a-cup teacups ride. Making new friends and practicing predivision skills have never been so exciting!
What do cars, toys, people, and jelly beans have in common? They can all be estimated. Two friends try out their estimating skills and find out that estimating can have real rewards––especially when there’s a contest to enter!
It’s Kangaroo’s birthday, but no one will play with him: not the emu, the platypuses, the koalas, or even the dingos. They all have too many things to do. What exactly are they doing? They’re using multiplication to figure out just how many things they have to do to plan a big surprise for Kangaroo! Best Children’s Science Books 1997 (Science Books and Films)
It's a long way around Perimeter Path! Mike's brother and sister say he's too young to compete in the 15-kilometer bike race. But if Mike just gets a chance, he knows he can make it all the way around.
Stuart J. Murphy travels all over the UnitedStates talking to thousands of kids. And you'll never believe what they talk about: MATH! Stuart shows kids that they use math every day -- to share a pizza, spend their allowance, even sort socks. Stuart writes funny stories about math -- and if you read his books, you'll start to see the fun in math, too. Hamster Champs With a few blocks, a board, and a protractor to measure the angles, the hamster champs have built a ramp that lets them fly high! But will this stunt be good enough to outwit Hector the cat?

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