We were reaching the Student Union when Dr. Rosenau broke the silence. “You know, I never eat young ladies on Fridays. Only on Tuesdays.”I couldn't help laughing. “Do I look that apprehensive?”“Yes, rather.” He opened the door for me. “But I have just the cure for you. It's David Rosenau's patented shyness remedy, strawberry shortcake garnished with whipped cream, to be taken at least once weekly in charming company. Doctor's orders.”Kate is a college junior, a gifted student who skipped two grades in school, a naval officer's daughter who's lived in more places than she can remember. Shy and bookish, she's never had a boyfriend, let alone been kissed or gone on a date. Kate thinks falling in love is something that only happens to other girls.David is a college professor, a sailor, a brilliant scientist trapped in a failed marriage; he buries himself in teaching and research. David's convinced that love has passed him by and he'll go through life with an empty heart.When Kate gets a campus job as David's typist, they discover they're both mistaken. Letters To My Mother is the story of a May-December romance set in 1950s Seattle.
A Filipina American woman recalls her childhood during wartime and peace Going from the jungles of the wartime Philippines to the schoolyards of northwestern Oklahoma is no easy transition. For one twelve-year-old girl, it meant distance not only across the globe but also within her own family. Born to a Filipino father and an American mother, Helen Madamba experienced terrifying circumstances at a young age. During World War II, her father, Jorge, fought as an American soldier in his native Philippines, and his family camped in jungles and slept in caves for more than two years to evade capture by the Japanese. But once the family relocated to Woodward, Oklahoma, young Helen faced a different kind of struggle. Here Mossman tells of her efforts to repudiate her Asian roots so she could fit into American mainstream culture—and her later efforts to come to terms with her identity during the tumultuous 1960s. As she recounts her father’s wartime exploits and gains an appreciation of his life, she learns to rejoice in her biracial and multicultural heritage. Written with the skill of a gifted storyteller and graced with photos that capture both of Helen’s worlds, A Letter to My Father is a poignant story that will resonate with anyone familiar with the struggle to reconcile past and present identities.
Former President George H.W. Bush, revealed through his letters and writings from 1941 to 2010, is “worth its weight in gold…a valuable update of the life of an honorable American leader” (The Washington Post). “Who knew that beneath George Bush’s buttoned-up propriety pulsed the warm heart of a prolific and occasionally poetic writer with a wacky sense of humor?” (People) Though reticent in public, George Bush openly shared his private thoughts in correspondence throughout his life. This collection of letters, diary entries, and memos is the closest we’ll ever get to his autobiography. Organized chronologically, readers will gain insights into Bush’s career highlights—the oil business, his two terms in Congress, his ambassadorship to the UN, his service as an envoy to China, his tenure with the Central Intelligence Agency, and of course, the vice presidency, the presidency, and the post-presidency. They will also observe a devoted husband, father, and American. Ranging from a love letter to Barbara and a letter to his mother about missing his daughter, Robin, after her death from leukemia to a letter to his children written just before the beginning of Desert Storm, this collection is remarkable for Bush’s candor, humor, and poignancy. “An unusual glimpse of the private thoughts of a public figure” (Newsweek), this revised edition includes new letters and photographs that highlight the Bush family’s enduring legacy, including letters that cover George W. Bush’s presidency, 9/11, Bush senior’s work with President Clinton to help the victims of natural disasters, and the meaning of friendship and family. All the Best, George Bush “will shed more light on the man’s personal character and public persona than any memoir or biography could” (Publishers Weekly).
Hailed by Toni Morrison as “required reading,” a bold and personal literary exploration of America’s racial history by “the single best writer on the subject of race in the United States” (The New York Observer) #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER | NATIONAL BOOK AWARD WINNER | NAACP IMAGE AWARD WINNER | PULITZER PRIZE FINALIST | NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FINALIST | NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review • O: The Oprah Magazine • The Washington Post • People • Entertainment Weekly • Vogue • Los Angeles Times • San Francisco Chronicle • Chicago Tribune • New York • Newsday • Library Journal • Publishers Weekly In a profound work that pivots from the biggest questions about American history and ideals to the most intimate concerns of a father for his son, Ta-Nehisi Coates offers a powerful new framework for understanding our nation’s history and current crisis. Americans have built an empire on the idea of “race,” a falsehood that damages us all but falls most heavily on the bodies of black women and men—bodies exploited through slavery and segregation, and, today, threatened, locked up, and murdered out of all proportion. What is it like to inhabit a black body and find a way to live within it? And how can we all honestly reckon with this fraught history and free ourselves from its burden? Between the World and Me is Ta-Nehisi Coates’s attempt to answer these questions in a letter to his adolescent son. Coates shares with his son—and readers—the story of his awakening to the truth about his place in the world through a series of revelatory experiences, from Howard University to Civil War battlefields, from the South Side of Chicago to Paris, from his childhood home to the living rooms of mothers whose children’s lives were taken as American plunder. Beautifully woven from personal narrative, reimagined history, and fresh, emotionally charged reportage, Between the World and Me clearly illuminates the past, bracingly confronts our present, and offers a transcendent vision for a way forward. Praise for Between the World and Me “Powerful . . . a searing meditation on what it means to be black in America today.”—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times “Eloquent . . . in the tradition of James Baldwin with echoes of Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man . . . an autobiography of the black body in America.”—The Boston Globe “Brilliant . . . [Coates] is firing on all cylinders.”—The Washington Post “Urgent, lyrical, and devastating . . . a new classic of our time.”—Vogue “A crucial book during this moment of generational awakening.”—The New Yorker “Titanic and timely . . . essential reading.”—Entertainment Weekly
"One of the most astonishing and revelatory pieces of writing ever produced by this twentieth-century literary icon, presented in both the original German and the English translation. Kafka's letter to his father is at once an exploration of his relationship to his father, his need to write, and the source of his fear--one that his father prompts in him but that is beyond the scope of Kafka's memory and power of reasoning. There is no greater text about authority, the disfiguring effects of shame, and, in particular, Kafka's lifelong need to have his father's unobtainable approval"--
In this lyrical, unsentimental, and compelling memoir, the son of a black African father and a white American mother searches for a workable meaning to his life as a black American. It begins in New York, where Barack Obama learns that his father—a figure he knows more as a myth than as a man—has been killed in a car accident. This sudden death inspires an emotional odyssey—first to a small town in Kansas, from which he retraces the migration of his mother’s family to Hawaii, and then to Kenya, where he meets the African side of his family, confronts the bitter truth of his father’s life, and at last reconciles his divided inheritance. Pictured in lefthand photograph on cover: Habiba Akumu Hussein and Barack Obama, Sr. (President Obama's paternal grandmother and his father as a young boy). Pictured in righthand photograph on cover: Stanley Dunham and Ann Dunham (President Obama's maternal grandfather and his mother as a young girl). From the Trade Paperback edition.
Franz Kafka first met Felice Bauer in August 1912, at the home of his friend Max Brod. The twenty-five-year-old career woman from Berlin—energetic, down-to-earth, life-affirming—awakened in him a desire to marry. Kafka wrote to Felice almost daily, sometimes even twice a day. Because he was living in Prague and she in Berlin, their letters became their sole source of knowledge of each other. But soon after their engagement in 1914, Kafka began having doubts about the relationship, fearing that marriage would imperil his dedication to writing and interfere with his need for solitude. Through their break-up, a second engagement in 1917, and their final parting later that year, when Kafka began falling ill with the tuberculosis that would eventually claim his life, their correspondence continued. The more than five hundred letters that Kafka wrote to Felice over the course of those five years were acquired by Schocken from her in 1955. They reveal the full measure of Kafka's inner turmoil as he tried, in vain, to balance his need for stability with the demands of his craft. "These letters are indispensable for anyone seeking a more intimate knowledge of Kafka and his fragmented world." —Library Journal
I knew I liked to write was when I was a teenager, locking myself in my room. I was angry and frustrated and needed a positive outlet. I was tired of breaking things that were really important to me. I was sad having to pick up pieces of my little treasures. So I picked up a pencil and started writing about how I felt and why I was being self destructive. I was determined to find a way to diffuse the confusion in my head. I was taught very early to pray and I'd put my prayers on paper. Seeing something written brought me back into reality. I had a reference point. Something I could read over and over to remind myself who I was and that I would be ok. This is my story of survival. My journey from the traumatic experience of being molested countless times by my step-father while living within the strict religious practices of Jehovah's Witnesses to my healing process with Parents United. I thought my life of confusion, mistrust and low self-esteem could never change. As I got older, I constantly attracted more dysfunction in my choices and relationships. I didn't know I could change that. I didn't know any better. I became afraid for my children. I thought I was crazy and didn't have good parenting skills. After years of therapy, I learned to have control over my life and how to take the power back that I kept giving away. I am no longer a victim. It has been a long and twisty road. Today, I am proud to be happy, healthy and productive in my world. I am proud to be a survivor! I hope to inspire others and give them hope that the craziness in their heads can go away. I want to keep talking about this until the cycle is broken and children can always be cherished.
When she was 13, Virginia Galilei, eldest daughter of the great scientist Galileo, was placed by her father in a convent near him in Florence and took the name Suor Maria Celeste. Unable to see him except on his occasional visits, she wrote him continually, as her 124 surviving letters (which Galileo kept) attest. Now, for the first time, all of these letters are reproduced in English, translated by Dava Sobel, and in their original Italian, and Ms. Sobel has also written an introduction and annotations placing the letters in historical context. The 124 letters span only a decade of Maria Celeste's 33 years. In that dramatic period, a pope came to power who battled the Protestant Reformation; the Thirty Years' War embroiled all of Europe; the bubonic plague erupted across Italy; and a new philosophy of science, promulgated most forcefully by Galileo himself, threatened to overturn the order of the universe. Maria Celeste's evocative, beautifully written letters touch on all of these situations, but they dwell in the small details of everyday life; and though Galileo's letters to her have not survived, it is clear from hers that he answered every one. Especially for those who have read Ms. Sobel's Galileo's Daughter, but even for those who haven't, Maria Celeste's letters provide an indelible chronicle of convent life in the early 17th century, a memorable portrait of deep affection between a famous father and his daughter, and fascinating insight into Galileo himself.
Collects letters written to President Barack Obama during his presidential campaign and subsequent election and inauguration, covering a wide range of topics including foreign policy, the Bush administration, and religion.
Provides a collection of letters to young black men offering advice and encouragement.
Every father would like to play an equal and effective role in raising his son. The author offers his observations and insights from personal experiences and his interaction with children and families through his teaching career. The author offers through a letter to help raise his son by proxy giving intimate advice and guidance to facilitate a strong and wholesome character. He confronts major issues such as education, courtship, love and war from the unique perspective as he struggled to compensate for the same emotional void in his life.
Life can change in the blink of an eye or even be destroyed by the love of someones heart. Jacob Tyler Banks was born with two loveable parents. His father, Tyler, is one of the best lawyers in town while his beautiful mother takes care of the things at home. His life was smooth sailing until it drastically turned around when he met a lovely girl named Rachael Stone. Find yourself riveted with a love story like no other with The Letter. Tyler Banks is a busy man. Too busy with a line of clients each day, he only has limited time to be with his beautiful wife and son. Fairly detached from his family, he has a dark secret that he has kept for more than twenty years. But that secret is about to be revealed unless he is going to do something about it. But can he really carry out his plan that could break his sons heart and leave him emotionally wounded forever? Lynn Banks is a stay-home mom and wife. She has everything she ever wanted. She loves her husband and son so much that she doesnt want them to get hurt in any way. But what they didnt know is that she actually lived two different lives and it is all up to her if she prolongs this pain that has been kept buried in her heart for so many years. Follow the different characters stories of love, lust, deceit, and pain and see if love can truly conquer everything in this riveting story.
First published in 1995. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
LIke his previous best-selling journals, virtually every entry bespeaks a depth of relationship with the Beloved that is inspiring to all readers. Page after page we encounter a man of great faith as he wrestles with the divine by sharing his hopes and fears, his greatest joys and his deepest sorrows. Father Greeley's honest approach to his inner struggles is refreshing and calls us to be honest with ourselves, especially when asking where God is in our lives. By entering into this personal prayer experience, we cannot help but to be touched and transformed.
Women who opt not to be mothers are frequently warned that they will regret their decision later in life, yet we rarely talk about the possibility that the opposite might also be true-that a woman who becomes a mother might regret it. Sociologist Orna Donath dispels the silence around this profoundly taboo subject in a powerful work that draws from her years of research interviewing women who wish they had never become mothers.Donath treats regret as a feminist issue- as regret marks the road not taken, we need to consider whether alternative paths for women may currently be blocked off. Donath asks that we pay attention to what is forbidden by our contemporary rules governing motherhood, time, and emotion, including the cultural assumption that motherhood is a "natural" role for women-for the sake of all women, not just those who regret becoming mothers. Donath finds that the women in her study became mothers for a wide variety of reasons- some did so to avoid divorce, exclusion from their family, or alienation from their friends; others did not think about it at all, but accepted it as the "next step" of what society considers to be a normal and natural life course. Others experinced regret despite initially having an strong desire to become mothers. Though they may love their children, these women each describe the agonizing guilt and suffering they have experienced as a result of becoming mothers, and consider the different ways they have each come to recognize and deal with these conflicts.If we are disturbed by the idea that a woman might regret becoming a mother, Donath says, our response should not be to silence and shame these women; rather, we need to ask honest and difficult questions about how society pushes women into motherhood and why those who reconsider it are still seen as a danger to the status quo. Groundbreaking, thoughtful, and provocative, this is an especially needed book in our current political climate, as women's reproductive rights continue to be at the forefront of nationwide debates.
Confidential letters written by Galileo's illegitimate daughter Maria Celeste to her father during the most difficult period of his life. Respectful and chiding, entertaining and suspenseful, oftentimes emotionally wrenching, these letters reveal the dynamics of a tense father/daughter relationship played against the lively backdrop of Maria Celest's convent enclosure, Galileo's domestic life, and the not too distant background of contemporary intellectual milieus and of Florentine middle-class society. As the correspondence develops, a drama of cross-purposes comes to the fore: those of Maria Celeste, unwittingly pinning her reason for living on her father's prestige and her love of him, of Galileo, ready to wager his future on the approval of the religious authorities, and of the Roman clergy, determined to uphold the letter of Catholic dogma. Translated into modern American English in a style faithful to the spirit of the author by a scholar of Italian literature and culture, with an introduction and extensive notes on the Renaissance world, on religious women's writing, and on Sister Maria Celeste's life.
In these letters, de Beauvoir tells Sartre everything, tracing the extraordinary complications of their triangular love life; they reveal her not only as manipulative and dependent, but also as vulnerable, passionate, jealous, and committed.

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