This is a revised typesetting and reprinted volume by Kalam Research & Media in association with the Libya Institute for Advanced Studies (LIAS). The original work was published in 1970 by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and the Yale University Press.
Kaum ein Vorgang veränderte die Welt im 20. Jahrhundert so sehr wie das Ende kolonialer Herrschaft in Asien und Afrika. In systematischen und chronologischen Kapiteln beschreibt das Buch diesen Prozess mit seinen weiten Ausläufern im gesamten Jahrhundert und bietet lokale, imperiale und globale Erklärungen an. Es fragt nach den Auswirkungen der Dekolonisation auf Weltwirtschaft, internationales System und Ideengeschichte sowie nach den vielfältigen langfristigen Folgen für die ehemaligen Kolonien und Metropolen.
This book argues that since the end of the Cold War an international community of liberal states has crystallised within the broader international society of sovereign states. Significantly, this international community has demonstrated a tendency to deny non-liberal states their previously held sovereign right to non-intervention. Instead, the international community considers only those states that demonstrate respect for liberal democratic standards to be sovereign equals. Indeed the international community, motivated by the theory that international peace and security can only be achieved in a world composed exclusively of liberal states, has engaged in a sustained campaign to promote its liberal values to non-liberal states. This campaign has had (and continues to have) a profound impact upon the structure and content of international law. In light of this, this book deploys the concepts of the international society and the international community in order to construct an explanatory framework that can enable us to better understand recent changes to the political and legal structure of the world order and why violations of international peace and security occur.
Der Band beleuchtet die Hintergründe des libyschen Machtkampfes und versucht, Antworten auf die brennendsten Fragen zu geben: Wie kam es dazu, dass ein ursprünglich revolutionäres, antikolonialistisches Projekt der Herrschaft des Volkes zu einer Diktatur über das Volk verkommen ist? Was ist vom neuen Libyen zu erwarten? Kommt es gar zu einer Teilung des Landes? Und welche Interessen vertritt der Westen tatsächlich mit seinen Bomben und Marschflugkörpern?
In this comprehensive study, first published in 1950, Professor Fisher examines all the principal elements – physical and human – that influence environment, development and ways of life in the Middle East. An analysis of the physical basis of the region is followed by detailed treatment of the complex human and social aspects; a concluding section brings together, on a regional basis, the elements discussed in the first two parts. With first-hand experience within the Middle East, Fisher presents a detailed and fascinating study, based on surveys and investigations he personally carried out. Including wide-ranging geographical, historical, sociological and political perspectives, this title provides essential background to anyone with an interest in Middle Eastern affairs.
Algeria sits at the crossroads of the Atlantic, European, Arab, and African worlds. Yet, unlike the wars in Korea and Vietnam, Algeria's fight for independence has rarely been viewed as an international conflict. Even forty years later, it is remembered as the scene of a national drama that culminated with Charles de Gaulle's decision to "grant" Algerians their independence despite assassination attempts, mutinies, and settler insurrection. Yet, as Matthew Connelly demonstrates, the war the Algerians fought occupied a world stage, one in which the U.S. and the USSR, Israel and Egypt, Great Britain, Germany, and China all played key roles. Recognizing the futility of confronting France in a purely military struggle, the Front de Lib?ration Nationale instead sought to exploit the Cold War competition and regional rivalries, the spread of mass communications and emigrant communities, and the proliferation of international and non-governmental organizations. By harnessing the forces of nascent globalization they divided France internally and isolated it from the world community. And, by winning rights and recognition as Algeria's legitimate rulers without actually liberating the national territory, they rewrote the rules of international relations. Based on research spanning three continents and including, for the first time, the rebels' own archives, this study offers a landmark reevaluation of one of the great anti-colonial struggles as well as a model of the new international history. It will appeal to historians of post-colonial studies, twentieth-century diplomacy, Europe, Africa, and the Middle East. A Diplomatic Revolution was winner of the 2003 Stuart L. Bernath Prize of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations, and the Akira Iriye International History Book Award, The Foundation for Pacific Quest.
A detailed picture and analysis of the state of the field, an agenda for future research, and a detailed, annotated bibliography of the best research published thus far.
This book examines the wartime controversies between Britain and America about the future of the colonial world, and considers the ethical, military, and economic forces behind imperialism during World War II. It concludes that, for Britain, there was a revival of the sense of colonialmission; the Americans, on the other hand, felt justified in creating a strategic fortress in the Pacific Islands while carrying the torch of "international trusteeship" throughout the rest of the world--a scheme that Churchill and others viewed as a cloak for American expansion.

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