Living Dinosaurs offers a snapshot of our current understanding of the origin and evolution of birds. After slumbering for more than a century, avian palaeontology has been awakened by startling new discoveries on almost every continent. Controversies about whether dinosaurs had real feathers or whether birds were related to dinosaurs have been swept away and replaced by new and more difficult questions: How old is the avian lineage? How did birds learn to fly? Which birds survived the great extinction that ended the Mesozoic Era and how did the avian genome evolve? Answers to these questions may help us understand how the different kinds of living birds are related to one another and how they evolved into their current niches. More importantly, they may help us understand what we need to do to help them survive the dramatic impacts of human activity on the planet.
Recreates life among the dinosaurs living in North America seventy-five million years ago.
The book ranges from the thorny devil in Australia to crocodiles and everything in between. The book looks at the habitat range, breeding strategies and survival techniques of this fascinating array of animals and showcases extraordinary reptiles from the three meter long Komodo dragon to the gentle giant tortoises of the Galapagos.
Describes several living reptiles, including lizards, alligators, and tortoises, and discusses their similarities to dinosaurs.
In Diatoms to Dinosaurs, Chris McGowan takes the reader on a fascinating journey through the natural world, and examines life in all its various forms. He imparts the excitement of discovery and the joy of understanding as he demonstrates the central importance of size and scale to the survival of living organisms.McGowan investigates a wide range of size-related phenomena, from the gliding mechanism of diatoms to blood pressure problems of dinosaurs. Questions asked -- and answered -- include: Will we ever see giant insects the size of pterodactyls? Why are ants so much stronger relative to body size than elephants? What do a clam, a condor, a tortoise, and a sturgeon have in common? How did the skeleton of a 28-ton Apatosaurus support its weight? How can blood get from the heart to the head of a giraffe without rupturing blood vessels? The author explicates the scientific concepts -- both physical and biological -- needed to inform the relevant phenomena: area/volume relations, metabolism and other basic physiology, kinetic energy, inertial forces, the biology of senescence, boundary layers, and Reynolds numbers. Numerous illustrations scattered throughout the text make the biophysical principles easily comprehensible to readers, regardless of their scientific sophistication.
An American explorer and cryptozoologist chronicles his adventures on the Congo searching for the elusive Mokele-Mbembe, a dinosaur-like creature reported to live in the river. By the author of The Search for the Pink-Headed Duck.
Single title not sold individually. Sold as part of larger package only.
With a lively rhyming text and vibrant paper collage illustrations, author-artist Bob Barner shakes the dust off the dinosaur bones found in museums and reminds us that they once belonged to living, breathing creatures. Filled with fun dinosaur facts (a T. Rex skull can weigh up to 750 pounds!) and an informational "Dinometer," Dinosaur Bones is sure to make young dinosaur enthusiasts roar with delight.
This exciting photo book introduces kids to the wonders and dangers of the land of dinosaurs. Pop-up pictures and realistic sounds bring to life the atmosphere of nature in all its wildness. Pull-out cards provide detailed information about each creature.
Dinosaur memories are hard to forget! Most who revel in the current renaissance in dinosaur science, art, fiction and movies, or who enjoy the other appealing prehistoric animals so well popularized by the media have fond recollections of what it was like “growing up dinosaur.” Together with wife Diane and his father Allen G. Debus, Allen A. Debus unveils treasured dinosaur memories and stories about prehistoric animals and paleo-people, spanning from the cold-blooded dinosaur ‘era,’ to the modern wave dinosaur renaissance. Beginning with fondly recalled roadtrips to prehistoric places where T. rex still reigns, Dinosaur Memories ventures into the realm of thunder beasts and explores the rich ‘pop-cultural’ appeal of prehistoric animals. If you’ve ever collected dinosaurs, enjoyed fossil hunting or visits to see the old bones in museums, Dinosaur Memories is a book you’ll still recall years from now! Thirty-five chapters are grouped into seven sections titled, “Roads Into Prehistory,” “Thunder Beasts,” “Dinosaur Worlds,” “Fantasy Dinosaurs,” “Fossil Trickery,” “Paleo-people,” and “Rustlin’ up Dinos.”

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