This is a new revised version of Dr. Laslett's standard edition of Two Treatises. First published in 1960, and based on an analysis of the whole body of Locke's publications, writings, and papers. The Introduction and text have been revised to incorporate references to recent scholarship since the second edition and the bibliography has been updated.
This is the revised version of Peter Laslett's acclaimed edition of Two Treatises of Government, which is widely recognised as one of the classic pieces of recent scholarship in the history of ideas, read and used by students of political theory throughout the world. This 1988 edition revises Dr Laslett's second edition (1970) and includes an updated bibliography, a guide to further reading and a fully reset and revised introduction which surveys advances in Locke scholarship since publication of the second edition. In the introduction, Dr Laslett shows that the Two Treatises were not a rationalisation of the events of 1688 but rather a call for a revolution yet to come.
Das vorliegende Buch gibt eine legitimationstheoretische Antwort auf die Fragen, ob die auswärtige Gewalt exekutivischer Natur ist und welchen Beitrag das Europäische Parlament zur europäischen Außenpolitik zu leisten vermag und zieht sie zur Entfaltung einer legitimen europäischen Außenpolitik heran. Die Monographie zeichnet ein Gesamtbild der auswärtigen Gewalt des Europäischen Parlaments im Vergleich zur auswärtigen Gewalt des Deutschen Bundestages und derjenigen des US-amerikanischen Kongresses. Das Locke ́sche Dogma der außenpolitischen Prärogative der Exekutive dominiert nicht nur im nationalen Rahmen, insbesondere in der Rechtsprechung des BVerfG, vielmehr ist es auch symmetrisch auf Unionsebene wirksam. Dieses Dogma analysiert die Arbeit im Geflecht Lockes Legitimitätstheorie und Gewaltenteilungslehre. Daneben steht eine Untersuchung des diesem Dogma zugrundeliegenden Gesetzesbegriffes, die für die auswärtige Gewalt der Union nutzbar gemacht wird. Das Werk arbeitet die legitimationsstiftende Leistung des Europäischen Parlaments zu außenpolitischen Handlungen der EU heraus und sichert die abstrakt gewonnenen Erkenntnisse empirisch durch ausgewählte Fallstudien ab.
John Locke's account of natural law, which forms the very basis of his political philosophy, has troubled many critics over time. The two works that shed light on Locke's theory are the early Essays on the Law of Nature and the Second Treatise of Government, published over 20 years later. Many critics have assumed that the early work presents a voluntarist approach to natural law and the second a rationalist approach, but the present analysis in this book shows that Locke's theory is consistent. Both works present a concept of the law of nature that must be placed between voluntarism and rationalism. (Series: Polyptoton. Munster Collection, Academic Writings / Polyptoton. Munsteraner Sammlung Akademischer Schriften - Vol. 3)
An Approach to Political Philosophy: Locke in Context brings together Professor Tully's most important and innovative statements on Locke in a systematic treatment of the latter's thought that is at once contextual and critical. Each essay has been rewritten and expanded for this volume, and each seeks to understand a theme of Locke's political philosophy by interpreting it in light of the complex contexts of early modern European political thought and practice. These historical studies are then used in a variety of ways to gain critical perspectives on the assumptions underlying current debates in political philosophy and the history of political thought. The themes treated include government, toleration, discipline, property, aboriginal rights, individualism, power, labour, self-ownership, community, progress, liberty, participation, and revolution.
This study in the history of ideas consults a wide range of sources both known and less familiar to trace the development in the 18th century of an anthropological historiography, which aims to ascertain the unity of human nature and human cultural history. The study unfolds a picture of European enlightenment thinking that reflects seemingly irrational phenomena of imagination together with the cultural practices and mythologies of ‘uncivilized’ peoples and thus formulates fundamental questions for modern anthropology and the philosophy of history.
Vom "Leviathan", einem der bedeutendsten theoretischen Werke über die Ursprünge und Grundlagen der Idee des Staates und der bürgerlichen Gesellschaft, liegt nun erstmalig eine deutschsprachige Ausgabe vor, die den Text der englischen Erstausgabe von 1651 vollständig und nach den allgemein anerkannten philologischen Kriterien textgetreu darbietet. Die Ausgabe enthält die umfangreichen Marginalien der Erstausgabe und ist quellenkritisch kommentiert. Mit einer Einführung, Chronologie, Literaturverzeichnis, Register und umfangreiche Anmerkungen.
The concept of the just war poses one of the most important ethical questions to date. Can war ever be justified and, if so, how? When is a cause of war proportional to its costs and who must be held responsible? The monograph Just and Unjust Wars in Shakespeare demonstrates that the necessary moral evaluation of these questions is not restricted to the philosophical moral and political discourse. This analysis of Shakespeare's plays, which focuses on the histories, tragedies and Roman plays in chronological order, brings to light that the drama includes an elaborate and complex debate of the ethical issues of warfare. The plays that feature in this analysis range from Henry VI to Coriolanus and they are analysed according to the three Aquinian principles of legitimate authority, just cause and right intention. Also extending the principles of analysis to more modern notions of responsibility, proportionality and the jus in bello-presupposition, this monograph shows that just war theory constitutes a dominant theoretical approach to war in the Shakespearean canon.
This is a guide to the vast amount of literature on the history of political thought which has appeared in English since 1945. The editors provide an annotation of the content of many entries and, where appropriate, indicate their significance, controversial nature and readability.
'Man being born...to perfect freedom...hath by nature a power...to preserve his property, that is, his life, liberty and estate.' Locke's Second Treatise of Government (1689) is one of the great classics of political philosophy, widely regarded as the foundational text of modern liberalism. In it Locke insists on majority rule, and regards no government as legitimate unless it has the consent of the people. He sets aside people's ethnicities, religions, and cultures and envisages political societies which command our assent because they meet our elemental needs simply as humans. His work helped to entrench ideas of a social contract, human rights, and protection of property as the guiding principles for just actions and just societies. Published in the same year, A Letter Concerning Toleration aimed to end Christianity's wars of religion and called for the separation of church and state so that everyone could enjoy freedom of conscience. In this edition of these two major works, Mark Goldie considers the contested nature of Locke's reputation, which is often appropriated by opposing political and religious ideologies. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.
We know more about the development of John Locke's ideas than we do about almost any other philosopher's before modern times. This book brings together a comprehensive collection of the writings on politics and society that stand outside the canonical works which Locke published during his lifetime. In the aftermath of the Revolution of 1688 the three works by which he is chiefly known appeared: the Two Treatises of Government, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, and A Letter Concerning Toleration, and the themes raised in these works had been reflected upon over many years. Mark Goldie's edition makes possible the fullest exploration of the evolution of Locke's ideas concerning the philosophical foundations of morality and sociability, the boundary of church and state, the shaping of constitutions, and the conduct of government and public policy.

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