Discusses how and why such settlements as villages and cities are founded and change over time, and describes the types of housing, jobs, stores, resources, services, and transportation that are offered in different settlements.
In Liquid Landscape, Michele Currie Navakas analyzes the history of Florida's incorporation alongside the development of new ideas of personhood, possession, and political identity within American letters, from early American novels, travel accounts, and geography textbooks, to settlers' guides, maps, natural histories, and land surveys.
Offering clear objectives for each unit that helps pupils understand the purpose of their work, this work includes a self-assessment checklist at the end for pupils to check and follow-up their understanding. It contains a 360 review page at the end of each chapter that provides a ready-made assessment for teachers and a useful review for pupils.
This book presents both rural and urban settlement issues in a single and accessible text. The authors examine a range of spatial concepts and models and apply these to a variety of locations, providing students with both a general understanding of a broad range of study, and an in-depth knowledge of specific places. The general concepts are explored through varied case studies drawn from around the world. These look at issues ranging from socio-economic change in rural Thailand and land reform in the Kenyan Highlands, to the social geography of Chicago and the changing morphology of an English country town.
Designed to develop students' geographical skills and to enable them to understand how and when to apply them, this book develops communication skills through the use of graphs, maps, photographs, writing and enquiry learning. It fits into any scheme of work and supports any Key Stage 3 geography course. Accompanied by a photocopiable pack of activity masters to provide teachers with additional resources to teach and develop these skills.
Maximise every student's grade potential with a step-by-step approach to learning, improving and applying the geographical and fieldwork skills they need to achieve stand-out success under the reformed OCR A and B GCSE Geography specifications. - Provides a complete, tailor-made solution to teaching the cartographic, graphical, numerical and statistical skills emphasised in the 2016 OCR A and B GCSE Geography specifications - Helps you prepare students for the changed fieldwork assessments and new question formats with a dedicated section on geographical enquiries - Supports students of varying abilities by moving from clear explanations of each skill to easy-to-follow guidance on applying the skills in an examination context - Offers plenty of opportunities to put newly-acquired skills into practice through a range of activities for all learners, as well as extension tasks designed for students targeting the top grades - Boosts students' confidence tackling terminal assessment with skills-focused exam-style questions and insider tips on common question types and topics - Cuts down your marking time and enables students to monitor their own progress by including answers for every activity and exam-style question
Maximise every student's performance with a step-by-step approach to learning, improving and applying the geographical and fieldwork skills they need to achieve their best under the reformed WJEC/Eduqas GCSE Geography specifications. - Provides a complete, tailor-made solution to teaching the cartographic, graphical, numerical and statistical skills emphasised in the 2016 WJEC Eduqas A and B GCSE Geography specifications - Helps you prepare students for the changed fieldwork assessments and new question formats with a dedicated section on geographical enquiries - Supports students of varying abilities by moving from clear explanations of each skill to easy-to-follow guidance on applying the skills in an examination context - Offers plenty of opportunities to put newly-acquired skills into practice through a range of activities for all learners, as well as extension tasks designed for students targeting the top grades - Boosts students' confidence tackling terminal assessment with skills-focused exam-style questions and insider tips on common question types and topics - Cuts down your marking time and enables students to monitor their own progress by including answers for every activity and exam-style question
Teachers will save valuable time through the use of suggested activities, assessment notes, mark schemes and teaching ideas. Teachers will benefit from further advice on developing an enquiry-based approach, assisting pupils with Special Educational Needs and incorporating cross-circular themes. Pupils will learn vital IT skills through the use of worksheets demonstrating how electronic media can be used to support their geographical studies.
rigid boundaries between ethnic groups. Usner's focus on commerce allows him to illuminate the motives in the contest for empire among the French, English, and Spanish, as well as to trace the personal networks of communication and exchange that existed among the territory's inhabitants. By tracing patterns of small-scale, face-to-face exchange, he reveals the economic and social world of early Louisianians and lays the groundwork for a better understanding of later.
How do migrants feel "at home" in their houses? Literature on the migrant house and its role in the migrant experience of home-building is inadequate. This book offers a theoretical framework based on the notion of home-building and the concepts of home and house embedded within it. It presents innovative research on four groups of migrants who have settled in two metropolitan cities in two periods: migrants from Italy (migrated in the 1950s and 1960s) and from mainland China (migrated in the 1990s and 2000s) in Melbourne, Australia, and migrants from Morocco (migrated in the 1950s and 1960s) and from the former Soviet Union (migrated in the 1990s and 2000s) in Tel Aviv, Israel. The analysis draws on qualitative data gathered from forty-six in depth interviews with migrants in their home-environments, including extensive visual data. Levin argues that the physical form of the house is meaningful in a range of diverse ways during the process of home-building, and that each migrant group constructs a distinct form of home-building in their homes/houses, according to their specific circumstances of migration, namely the origin country, country of destination and period of migration, as well as the historical, economic and social contexts around migration.
What are "essential questions," and how do they differ from other kinds of questions? What's so great about them? Why should you design and use essential questions in your classroom? Essential questions (EQs) help target standards as you organize curriculum content into coherent units that yield focused and thoughtful learning. In the classroom, EQs are used to stimulate students' discussions and promote a deeper understanding of the content. Whether you are an Understanding by Design (UbD) devotee or are searching for ways to address standards--local or Common Core State Standards--in an engaging way, Jay McTighe and Grant Wiggins provide practical guidance on how to design, initiate, and embed inquiry-based teaching and learning in your classroom. Offering dozens of examples, the authors explore the usefulness of EQs in all K-12 content areas, including skill-based areas such as math, PE, language instruction, and arts education. As an important element of their backward design approach to designing curriculum, instruction, and assessment, the authors *Give a comprehensive explanation of why EQs are so important; *Explore seven defining characteristics of EQs; *Distinguish between topical and overarching questions and their uses; *Outline the rationale for using EQs as the focal point in creating units of study; and *Show how to create effective EQs, working from sources including standards, desired understandings, and student misconceptions. Using essential questions can be challenging--for both teachers and students--and this book provides guidance through practical and proven processes, as well as suggested "response strategies" to encourage student engagement. Finally, you will learn how to create a culture of inquiry so that all members of the educational community--students, teachers, and administrators--benefit from the increased rigor and deepened understanding that emerge when essential questions become a guiding force for learners of all ages.
Presenting the settlement landscape of the Golan before and after June 1967, The Golan Heights deals with the issue of the border between Israel and Syria, and with the Israeli settlement process in the area following the Six Day War. The story of the Golan Heights and its position between Syria and Israel does not belong only to the past; it is still interwoven in the political present of the two countries. Public discourse in Israel on the political future of the Golan, and the direct and indirect political discussions between Israel and Syria, rest to a great extent on personal and collective memories, and these, by nature, are based on the past. The perceptions of the Israeli public were constructed upon the image of a mountain that became a monster. This image reached its peak on the eve of the Six Day War in June 1967, but continued to be consolidated and preserved in the Israeli collective memory, and so it has remained until the present. Addressing the question of the political future of the Golan, a central issue for both Israel and the wider Middle East, this book will be an invaluable resource for students and scholars of Political History, Settlement Geography and Geopolitics. Dr. Yigal Kipnis teaches International Relations at Haifa University. He received a BS in Civil Engineering from the Technion in Haifa and an MA and PhD in Land of Israel Studies from Haifa University. His first book, The Mountain That Was as a Monster: The Golan Between Syria and Israel, was published in 2009. His second book, 1973: The Way to War, published in 2012, immediately became a bestseller. It reveals the continuing political process which led to the Middle East war of October 1973.
"A thorough, wide-ranging analysis of the complex issues surrounding the white settlement of the Shenandoah Valley." -- William and Mary Quarterly
An illuminating history of North America's eleven rival cultural regions that explodes the red state-blue state myth. North America was settled by people with distinct religious, political, and ethnographic characteristics, creating regional cultures that have been at odds with one another ever since. Subsequent immigrants didn't confront or assimilate into an “American” or “Canadian” culture, but rather into one of the eleven distinct regional ones that spread over the continent each staking out mutually exclusive territory. In American Nations, Colin Woodard leads us on a journey through the history of our fractured continent, and the rivalries and alliances between its component nations, which conform to neither state nor international boundaries. He illustrates and explains why “American” values vary sharply from one region to another. Woodard (author of American Character: A History of the Epic Struggle Between Individual Liberty and the Common Good) reveals how intranational differences have played a pivotal role at every point in the continent's history, from the American Revolution and the Civil War to the tumultuous sixties and the "blue county/red county" maps of recent presidential elections. American Nations is a revolutionary and revelatory take on America's myriad identities and how the conflicts between them have shaped our past and are molding our future. From the Hardcover edition.

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