Losing Eden traces the environmental history and development of the American West and explains how the land has shaped and been shaped by the people who live there. Discusses key events and topics from the Beringia migration, Columbian Exchange, and federal territorial acquisition to post-war expansion, resource exploitation, and climate change Structures the coverage around three important themes: balancing economic success and ecological protection; avoiding "the tragedy of the commons"; and achieving sustainability Contains an accessible, up-to-date narrative written by an expert scholar and professor that supplements a variety of college-level survey or seminar courses on US, American West, or environmental history Incorporates student-friendly features, including definitions of key terms, suggested reading sections, and over 30 illustrations
Hamrick's groundbreaking new book lights the path to the single greatest shift in human consciousness since Adam and Eve ate the forbidden fruit.
They’re supposed to be business partners, but a lusty encounter between Eden and Damon sets their relationship on an unpredictable—and erotic—course Vibrant Eden Flynn is no stranger to bordellos; she was a bookkeeper in one, back in her days of poverty. So when she has to track down Damon Alexander, her handsome new mining partner, Eden doesn’t think twice about barging into a pleasure palace. But when Eden discovers her colleague entwined in a bargirl’s embrace, she can’t quell a rush of intense jealousy. She vows to make the brazen male want only her—not for just an afternoon, but for eternity. Damon has been a regular at the brothels in Queenstown, New Zealand. Betrayed by a woman and hardened by experience, the strong, rugged miner figures a frolic in a hired beauty’s bed is his most honest transaction. So when Eden unexpectedly shows up with demands of cooperation and trust, Damon sees only greed in her emerald eyes. Certain that a quick tumble will send the gorgeous gold digger packing, Damon expertly seduces her. But the hard-living man is taken by surprise when unquenchable desire ignites for his wicked, wild Eden.
For the first time, Joyce Milton gives us the dual biography of the wonder couple, Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh. Their love prevailed against a horrifying kidnapping and murder splashed throughout the media, their careers, and even the criticism they underwent following their involvement in the America First movement as the United States entered World War II. With new information presented about their son’s kidnapper, Bruno Hauptmann, and Charlie’s own role in the case, Milton gives her readers a lot to think about. Thoroughly researched, Milton exposes a new understanding of and view into the personalities and lives of Charles, Anne, and the time they lived in.
Understand the beliefs, customs, and rituals of each faith The fun and easy way to know the common elements of these widespread religions Want to know more about the faiths of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam? This plain-English guide traces their evolution from their commonorigin - Abraham - and explains their different, yet linked, beliefs.You'll see how each religion developed, endured setbacks, and became a fixture in modern society - and you'll learn how members havedeveloped similar approaches to worship. Discover: How the belief in one God originated The roots of Abraham's family tree The sacred texts of each faith Major similarities and differences How these religions influenced the world
"Legend doesn't merely survive the hype, it deserves it." From the New York Times bestselling author of The Young Elites What was once the western United States is now home to the Republic, a nation perpetually at war with its neighbors. Born into an elite family in one of the Republic's wealthiest districts, fifteen-year-old June is a prodigy being groomed for success in the Republic's highest military circles. Born into the slums, fifteen-year-old Day is the country's most wanted criminal. But his motives may not be as malicious as they seem. From very different worlds, June and Day have no reason to cross paths - until the day June's brother, Metias, is murdered and Day becomes the prime suspect. Caught in the ultimate game of cat and mouse, Day is in a race for his family's survival, while June seeks to avenge Metias's death. But in a shocking turn of events, the two uncover the truth of what has really brought them together, and the sinister lengths their country will go to keep its secrets. Full of nonstop action, suspense, and romance, this novel is sure to move readers as much as it thrills. From the Trade Paperback edition.
At what point did machines and technology begin to have an impact on the cultural consciousness and imagination of Europe? How was this reflected through the art and literature of the time? Was technology a sign of the fall of humanity from its original state of innocence or a sign of human progress and mastery over the natural world? In his characteristically lucid and captivating style, Jonathan Sawday investigates these questions and more by engaging with the poetry, philosophy, art, and engineering of the period to find the lost world of the machine in the pre-industrial culture of the European Renaissance. The aesthetic and intellectual dimension of these machines appealed to familiar figures such as Shakespeare, Francis Bacon, Montaigne, and Leonardo da Vinci as well as to a host of lesser known writers and artists in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. This intellectual engagement with machines in the European Renaissance gave rise to new attitudes towards gender, work and labour, and even fostered the new sciences of artificial life and reason which would be pursued by figures such as Descartes, Hobbes, and Leibniz in the seventeenth century. Writers, philosophers and artists had mixed and often conflicting reactions to technology, reflecting a paradoxical attitude between modern progress and traditional values. Underpinning the enthusiastic creation of a machine-driven world, then, were stories of loss and catastrophe. These contradictory attitudes are part of the legacy of the European Renaissance, just as much as the plays of Shakespeare or the poetry of John Milton. And this historical legacy helps to explain many of our own attitudes towards the technology that surrounds us, sustains us, and sometimes perplexes us in the modern world.
Showing that the loving family was an object of propaganda then as now, Belsey points to unexpected affinities between the world of early modern England and the present day. She demonstrates that political and moral claims that the family makes us whole -- as well as fears that it can be abusive -- are not new, but also dominate the early modern construction of the family. Shakespeare and the Loss of Eden expertly traces representations of the family in three related fields: Shakespeare's plays, the Reformation story of Adam and Eve as founders of the first nuclear family, and the visual imagery that decorates the cultural artifacts of the period, including furniture, tapestries, and tomb sculpture. Detailed readings of the plays reveal a wealth of reformation on the domestication of desire in marriage, parental love and cruelty, and sibling rivalry. Richly illustrated and written with perception and wit, the book is a major work of both literary criticism and cultural history.
"Wenn wir Eden nicht finden, werde ich mir nie, nie verzeihen, was letzten Samstagabend passiert ist." Obwohl die schüchterne Jess und die allseits beliebte Eden so unterschiedlich sind wie Tag und Nacht, kann nichts die beiden trennen. Bis Eden eines Tages spurlos verschwindet! Die Suche nach der vermissten Freundin konfrontiert Jess bald mit dunklen Kapiteln ihrer eigenen Vergangenheit, und dann ist da noch Liam, Edens Freund, mit dem Jess mehr verbindet als sie wahrhaben will. Liz Flanagans Debüt ist ein hochemotionaler Thriller im Spannungsfeld von Liebe, dunklen Familiengeheimnissen und einer außergewöhnlichen Freundschaft.
After breaking into the home of private investigator Shane O'Connor, Eden Victoria Lindsay must convince him that to take on her case and find her missing twin sister. Original.
The Commentary, the first full version on Paradise Lost since the Richardsons' in 1734, combines numerous resources with features used for the first time. It includes the best commentary from Annotations like Patrick Hume's (1695), to the variorum editions of Newton (1749) and Todd (1801-42), and the modern professional editions culminating in Alastair Fowler's (1968). Other elements include an essay on the early pre-annotative criticism from 1668, including Marvell, Dryden, Dennis, and others; copious use of the OED; numerous cross-references to Milton's other works and passages in Paradise Lost; fourteen excurses and other contributions by the present editors. This Commentary is itself a research library for Paradise Lost. It uniquely presents biblical, classical, and vernacular citations: the ultimate rather than a more recent source is cited, so dating the comment; every cited passage is quoted, and every question is in English. Only a text of the poem is required. Earl Miner is Townsend Martin, Class of 1917, Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Princeton University, William Moeck teaches English at Nassau Community College. Steven Jablonski is a public librari
It seems that ever since mankind was kicked out of the Garden of Eden for eating the forbidden fruit, we’ve been trying to get back in. Or at least, we’ve been wondering where the Garden might have been. St. Augustine had a theory, and so did medieval monks, John Calvin, and Christopher Columbus. But when Darwin’s theory of evolution permanently altered our understanding of human origins, shouldn’t the search for a literal Eden have faded away? Not so fast. In Paradise Lust, Brook Wilensky-Lanford introduces readers to the enduring modern quest to locate the Garden of Eden on Earth. It is an obsession that has consumed Mesopotamian archaeologists, German Baptist ministers, British irrigation engineers, and the first president of Boston University, among many others. These quixotic Eden seekers all started with the same brief Bible verses, but each ended up at a different spot on the globe: Florida, the North Pole, Ohio, China, and, of course, Iraq. Evocative of Tony Horwitz and Sarah Vowell, Wilensky-Lanford writes of these unusual characters and their search with sympathy and wit. Charming, enlightening, and utterly unique, Paradise Lust is a century-spanning history that will take you to places you never imagined.
The purpose of this study is to examine a few literary gardens of romance from the close of the 12th to the first half of the 13th century in light of the development of the figure of the enclosed garden as a female space that is not owned by a man, but rather by the woman who inhabits it.
One hundred testimonies on the Cuban diaspora are gathered together from narratives, interviews, creative writing, letters, journal entries, photographs, and paintings to capture the strong emotions surrounding this ongoing ordeal.

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