The author describes her grief after the accidental electrocution of her son Jason, and recounts how she eventually regained contact with his spirit.
“When a Child Dies From Drugs” is written by parents to help other parents who are experiencing the ultimate tragedy of their child’s death from drugs or alcohol - parents who find themselves isolated in a fathomless dark void wondering whether they will ever resurface into the real world again. This book offers strength, practical advice and an aid in grief recovery for parents and families, gleaned not only from personal experiences but also from meeting with many parents through their out-reach program,"G.R.A.S.P."(Grief Recovery After Substance Passing) Subjects covered range from the emotional trauma of learning of the child’s demise and on through the guilt, denial, anger, “what-if’s” and, finally, acceptance and to suggestions of how to cope daily and into a future which will never be the same. It is also illuminating to all those who know someone who has lost a loved one through drugs -What to say and do? What NOT to say and do? There is advice here for those who want to support families in grief. With personal insights this book is very much like friends reaching out to friends in compassion and kindness - friends who understand because, quite simply, the writers continue to be on the same journey as those they will comfort.
In When the Adults Change, Everything Changes: Seismic Shifts in School Behaviour, Paul Dix upends the debate on behaviour management in schools and offers effective tips and strategies that serve to end the search for change in children and turn the focus back on the adults. You can buy in the best behaviour tracking software, introduce 24/7 detentions or scream ‘NO EXCUSES’ as often as you want – but ultimately the solution lies with the behaviour of the adults. It is the only behaviour over which we have absolute control. Drawing on anecdotal case studies, scripted interventions and approaches which have been tried and tested in a range of contexts, from the most challenging urban comprehensives to the most privileged international schools, behaviour training expert and Pivotal Education director Paul Dix advocates an inclusive approach that is practical, transformative and rippling with respect for staff and learners. An approach in which behavioural expectations and boundaries are exemplified by people, not by a thousand rules that nobody can recall. When the Adults Change, Everything Changes illustrates how, with their traditional sanction- and exclusion-led methods, the ‘punishment brigade’ are losing the argument. It outlines how each school can build authentic practice on a stable platform, resulting in shifts in daily rules and routines, in how we deal with the angriest learners, in restorative practice and in how we appreciate positive behaviour. Each chapter is themed and concludes with three helpful checklists – Testing, Watch out for and Nuggets – designed to help you form your own behaviour blueprint. Throughout the book both class teachers and school leaders will find indispensable advice about how to involve all staff in developing a whole school ethos built on kindness, empathy and understanding. Suitable for all head teachers, school leaders, teachers, NQTs and classroom assistants – in any phase or context, including SEND and alternative provision settings – who are looking to upgrade their own classroom management or school behaviour plan. Contents include: Visible Consistency, Visible Kindness; The Counter-Intuitive Classroom; Deliberate Botheredness; Certainty in Adult Behaviour; Keystone Classroom Routines; Universal Microscripts: Flipping the Script; Punishment Addiction, Humiliation Hangover; Restore, Redraw, Repair; Some Children Follow Rules, Some Follow People; Your Behaviour Policy Sucks!; and The 30 Day Magic.
A family of forest animals learns to cope with the death of a loved one.
Offers parents advice for helping children suffering from a loss through the grieving process, emphasizing the role faith plays in healing.
How can children begin to understand death and cope with bereavement? And how can we, as adults, support and engage with children as they encounter this complex subject? Exploring how children and adolescents can engage with all aspects of death, dying and bereavement, this comprehensive guide looks at how children comprehend the death of a pet or someone close to them, their own dying, bereavement and grieving. It covers how you should discuss death with children, with a particular emphasis on the importance of listening to the child and adapting your approach based on their responses. The book offers guidance on how your own experiences of loss can provide you with models for your interactions with children on the subject of death.
Drawing upon extensive interviews and assessments of school-age children who have lost a parent to death, this book offers a richly textured portrait of the mourning process in children. The volume presents major findings from the Harvard Child Bereavement Study and places them in the context of previous research, shedding new light on both the wide range of normal variation in children's experiences of grief and the factors that put bereaved children at risk. Scientifically sound and clinically useful, this volume will be welcomed by child psychologists and psychiatrists; researchers, clinicians, and students in child and family psychology and bereavement; counselors; and other helping professionals who work with grieving families. It can serve as a text in advanced courses on bereavement, family and child therapy, and developmental psychopathology.
When children lose someone they love, life is never the same. In this sympathetic book, the authors advocate an open, honest approach, suggesting that our instinctive desire to "protect" children from the reality of death may be more harmful than helpful.
Explores the complex emotional issues children face after a parent commits suicide and offers practical advice on how the remaining parent and other family members can help them cope.
From one of America’s iconic writers, a stunning book of electric honesty and passion. Joan Didion explores an intensely personal yet universal experience: a portrait of a marriage–and a life, in good times and bad–that will speak to anyone who has ever loved a husband or wife or child. Several days before Christmas 2003, John Gregory Dunne and Joan Didion saw their only daughter, Quintana, fall ill with what seemed at first flu, then pneumonia, then complete septic shock. She was put into an induced coma and placed on life support. Days later–the night before New Year’s Eve–the Dunnes were just sitting down to dinner after visiting the hospital when John Gregory Dunne suffered a massive and fatal coronary. In a second, this close, symbiotic partnership of forty years was over. Four weeks later, their daughter pulled through. Two months after that, arriving at LAX, she collapsed and underwent six hours of brain surgery at UCLA Medical Center to relieve a massive hematoma. This powerful book is Didion’ s attempt to make sense of the “weeks and then months that cut loose any fixed idea I ever had about death, about illness . . . about marriage and children and memory . . . about the shallowness of sanity, about life itself.”
First published in 1984. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
A workbook to help children work out feelings about death. Heegaard provides a practical format for allowing children to understand the concept of death and develop coping skills for life. Children, with the supervision of an adult, are invited to illustrate and personalise their loss through art. When Someone Very Special Dies encourages the child to identify support systems and personal strengths.
The Elephant in the Room is a children's storybook with whimsical illustrations and rhyming verses of positive strategies for coping with grief and loss. The gender-neutral elephant character demonstrates the potential emotions that children may experience when faced with any type of loss such as death of a pet or a relative, a friend moving away, foster care, hospitalization, etc. This book can serve to initiate a discussion or to provide unconscious messages of love, power, and healing. The practical and realistic coping strategies are developmentally appropriate for young children in early childhood and are based in best practices according to research in children's literature and social-emotional development. It is recommended that the book be read daily, as needed, during traumatic events and that the adult wait patiently for the child to initiate a discussion. It is anticipated that The Elephant in the Room will serve as a transitional object for children experiencing grief and loss and that it will help them navigate their unique and individual journey towards healing, concurrently or in the years ahead. This book is a must-have for teachers, grief counselors, healthcare practitioners, therapists, social workers, and librarians. Additionally, it can serve as an important resource for families during difficult events.
We all have 'sad stuff' to deal with in life. What makes Michael Rosen most sad is thinking about his son, Eddie, who died. In this book he writes about his sadness, how it affects him, and some of the things he does to try to cope with it.
A practicing psychologist defines grief as the normal, expected, and healthy response to loss and provides a realistic appreciation for the pain, frustration, and difficult work required to overcome grief
What can we say to a child who has just lost a parent, a sibling, or other loved one? How can we be sure to say and do the right things without adding to the child's confusion and grief? And what if we are grieving, too? Grief in children may be expressed differently than in adults. In clear, concise language, Dr. William Kroen offers comfort, compassion, and sound advice to any adult who is helping a child cope with death. Incorporating insights and information from the respected Good Grief Program at the Judge Baker Children's Center in Boston, Massachusetts, and weaving in anecdotes about real children and their families, he explains how children from infancy through age 18 perceive and react to death. He offers suggestions on how we can respond to children at different ages and stages, and describes specific strategies we can use to guide and support them through the grieving process—from the first devastating days through commemorating the loved one and eventually moving on with life. Includes a list of recommended organizations and additional readings.
Saying Goodbye to Hare is a story about death and dying to be used with children aged 5-9 years This is an uplifting story. Beautifully illustrated, it is full of honesty and warmth. As young Rabbit witnesses the life, illness and death of his dear frien
Delivers the collective wisdom of foremost scholars and practitioners in the death and dying movement from its inception to the present. Written by luminaries who have shaped the field, this capstone book distills the collective wisdom of foremost scholars and practitioners who together have nearly a millennium of experience in the death and dying movement. The book bears witness to the evolution of the movement and presents the insights of its pioneers, eyewitnesses, and major contributors past and present. Its chapters address contemporary intellectual, institutional, and practice developments in thanatology: hospice and palliative care; funeral practice; death education; and caring of the dying, suicidal, bereaved, and traumatized. With a breadth and depth found in no other text on death, dying, and bereavement, the book disseminates the thinking of prominent authors William Worden, David Clark, Tony Walter, Robert Neimeyer, Charles Corr, Phyllis Silverman, Betty Davies, Therese A. Rando, Colin Murray Parkes, Kenneth Doka, Allan Kellehear, Sandra Bertman, Stephen Connor, Linda Goldman, Mary Vachon, and others. Their chapters discuss the most significant facets of early development, review important current work, and assess major challenges and hopes for the future in the areas of their expertise. A substantial chronology of important milestones in the contemporary movement introduces the book, frames the chapters to follow, and provides guidance for further, in-depth reading. The book first focuses on the interdisciplinary intellectual achievements that have formed the foundation of the field of thanatology. The section on institutional innovations encompasses contributions in hospice and palliative care of the dying and their families; funeral service; and death education. The section on practices addresses approaches to counseling and providing support for individuals, families, and communities on issues related to dying, bereavement, suicide, trauma, disaster, and caregiving. An Afterword identifies challenges and looks toward future developments that promise to sustain, further enrich, and strengthen the movement. KEY FEATURES: Distills the wisdom of pioneers in and major contributors to the contemporary death, dying, and bereavement movement Includes living witness accounts of the movement's evolution and important milestones Presents the best contemporary thinking in thanatology Describes contemporary institutional developments in hospice and palliative care, funeral practice, and death education Illuminates best practices in care of the dying, suicidal, bereaved, and traumatized
NOW A #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER! An unflinching, darkly funny, and deeply moving story of a boy, his seriously ill mother, and an unexpected monstrous visitor. At seven minutes past midnight, thirteen-year-old Conor wakes to find a monster outside his bedroom window. But it isn’t the monster Conor’s been expecting-- he’s been expecting the one from his nightmare, the nightmare he’s had nearly every night since his mother started her treatments. The monster in his backyard is different. It’s ancient. And wild. And it wants something from Conor. Something terrible and dangerous. It wants the truth. From the final idea of award-winning author Siobhan Dowd-- whose premature death from cancer prevented her from writing it herself-- Patrick Ness has spun a haunting and darkly funny novel of mischief, loss, and monsters both real and imagined.
Shortly before her death in 2004, Elisabeth Kübler-Ross and David Kessler, her collaborator, completed the manuscript for this, her final book. On Grief and Grieving is a fitting completion to her work. Thirty-six years and sixteen books ago, Kübler-Ross's groundbreaking On Death and Dying changed the way we talk about the end of life. Now On Grief and Grieving will profoundly influence the way we experience the process of grief. On Death and Dying began as a theoretical book, an interdisciplinary study of our fear of death and our inevitable acceptance of it. It introduced the world to the now-famous five stages: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. On Grief and Grieving applies these stages to the process of grieving and weaves together theory, inspiration, and practical advice, all based on Kübler-Ross's and Kessler's professional and personal experiences, and is filled with brief, topic-driven stories. It includes sections on sadness, hauntings, dreams, coping, children, healing, isolation, and even the subject of sex during grief. "I know death is close," Kübler-Ross says at the end of the book, "but not quite yet. I lie here like so many people over the years, in a bed surrounded by flowers and looking out a big window....I now know that the purpose of my life is more than these stages....It is not just about the life lost but also the life lived." In one of their final writing sessions, Kübler-Ross told Kessler, "The last nine years have taught me patience, and the weaker and more bed-bound I become, the more I'm learning about receiving love." On Grief and Grieving is Elisabeth Kübler-Ross's final legacy, one that brings her life's work profoundly full circle.

Best Books