Makers of the Media Mind is a collection of analytical essays focusing on the most important and original ideas contributed to the field of mass communication by journalism educators. Divided into six sections representing the most prominent areas of specialization in the field, this text serves two significant purposes: first, it acquaints readers with the lives of preeminent journalism educators; second, it provides concise discussions and evaluations of the most compelling ideas those educators have to offer. The editor of, and contributors to, this text contend that ideas cannot be appreciated fully without an understanding of the creators of those same ideas. They hope that this volume's coverage of "creators" as well as concepts will demonstrate that journalism education has played a critical role in the making of the "media mind."
News consumers made cynical by sensationalist banners—“AMERICA STRIKES BACK,” “THE TERROR OF ANTHRAX”—and lurid leads might be surprised to learn that in 1690, the newspaper Publick Occurrences gossiped about the sexual indiscretions of French royalty or seasoned the story of missing children by adding that “barbarous Indians were lurking about” before the disappearance. Surprising, too, might be the media’s steady adherence to, if continual tugging at, its philosophical and ethical moorings. These 39 essays, written and edited by the nation’s leading professors of journalism, cover the theory and practice of print, radio, and TV news reporting. Politics and partisanship, press and the government, gender and the press corps, presidential coverage, war reportage, technology and news gathering, sensationalism: each subject is treated individually. Appropriate for interested lay persons, students, professors and reporters. Instructors considering this book for use in a course may request an examination copy here.
This highly interpretive and eminently readable study of the Supreme Court during the period in which Melvin Fuller was Chief Justice offers a complete account of the cases the Court saw during one of the most tumultuous times in U.S. history.
Key Readings in Journalism brings together over thirty essential writings that every student of journalism should know. Designed as a primary text for undergraduate students, each reading was carefully chosen in response to extensive surveys from educators reflecting on the needs of today’s journalism classroom. Readings range from critical and historical studies of journalism, such as Walter Lippmann’s Public Opinion and Michael Schudson’s Discovering the News, to examples of classic reporting, such as Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward’s All the President’s Men. They are supplemented by additional readings to broaden the volume’s scope in every dimension, including gender, race, and nationality. The volume is arranged thematically to enable students to think deeply and broadly about journalism—its development, its practice, its key individuals and institutions, its social impact, and its future—and section introductions and headnotes precede each reading to provide context and key points for discussion.
If American journalism were a religion, as it has been called, then its supreme deity would be "objectivity." The high priests of the profession worship the concept, while the iconoclasts of advocacy journalism, new journalism, and cyberjournalism consider objectivity a golden calf. Meanwhile, a groundswell of tabloids and talk shows and the increasing infringement of market concerns make a renewed discussion of the validity, possibility, and aim of objectivity a crucial pursuit. Despite its position as the orbital sun of journalistic ethics, objectivity—until now—has had no historian. David T. Z. Mindich reaches back to the nineteenth century to recover the lost history and meaning of this central tenet of American journalism. His book draws on high profile cases, showing the degree to which journalism and its evolving commitment to objectivity altered–and in some cases limited—the public's understanding of events and issues. Mindich devotes each chapter to a particular component of this ethic–detachment, nonpartisanship, the inverted pyramid style, facticity, and balance. Through this combination of history and cultural criticism, Mindich provides a profound meditation on the structure, promise, and limits of objectivity in the age of cybermedia.
Scripps's daring endeavor to produce a newspaper without advertising
Journalism, Ethics and Society provides a comprehensive overview and critical analysis of debates within media ethics in relation to the purpose of news and journalism for society. It assesses how the meaning of news and journalism is central to a discourse in ethics and further evaluates the continuing role of liberalism in helping to define both theory and practice. Its timely and topical analysis focuses on two of the most central concepts within media ethics and journalistic practice: the US based Public Journalism 'movement' and European Union media policies. It provides new ways of thinking about media ethics and will be of interest to students and researchers working within the field of media, cultural studies and journalism, as well as scholars of philosophy.
The authors outline the main principles of journalism, discussing the ethical and professional issues affecting the work of newspeople, the forces shaping the profession, and the future of journalism. 50,000 first printing.
Reader's Guide Literature in English provides expert guidance to, and critical analysis of, the vast number of books available within the subject of English literature, from Anglo-Saxon times to the current American, British and Commonwealth scene. It is designed to help students, teachers and librarians choose the most appropriate books for research and study.
Over the past decade, outlets such as PolitiFact, FactCheck.org, and the Washington Post's Fact Checker have shaken up the political world by holding public figures accountable for what they say. Deciding What's True draws on Lucas Graves's unique access to the U.S. newsrooms leading the increasingly global fact-checking movement. Graves vividly recounts the routines of the journalists at three of these hyperconnected, technologically innovative news organizations. He shows how they tackle thorny political debates and reveals the values that drive their stories. He also plots a compelling, personality-driven history of the fact-checking movement and its recent evolution from the blogosphere, exploring its revolutionary challenge to journalistic ethics and practice.
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Whether the issue is the rise of religiously inspired terrorism, the importance of faith based NGOs in global relief and development, or campaigning for evangelical voters in the U.S., religion proliferates in our newspapers and magazines, on our radios and televisions, on our computer screens and, increasingly, our mobile devices. Americans who assumed society was becoming more and more secular have been surprised by religions' rising visibility and central role in current events. Yet this is hardly new: the history of American journalism has deep religious roots, and religion has long been part of the news mix. Providing a wide-ranging examination of how religion interacts with the news by applying the insights of history, sociology, and cultural studies to an analysis of media, faith, and the points at which they meet, The Oxford Handbook of Religion and the American News Media is the go-to volume for both secular and religious journalists and journalism educators, scholars in media studies, journalism studies, religious studies, and American studies. Divided into five sections, this handbook explores the historical relationship between religion and journalism in the USA, how religion is covered in different media, how different religions are reported on, the main narratives of religion coverage, and the religious press.
1906 bestseller shockingly reveals intolerable labor practices and working conditions in the Chicago stockyards as it tells the grim story of a Slavic family that emigrates to America full of optimism but soon faces despair.
"Although Squier is best known today for the classic book he coauthored with Edwin H. Davis, Ancient Monuments of the Mississippi Valley, Terry A. Barnhart shows that Squier's fieldwork and interpretive contributions to archaeology and anthropology continued over the next three decades. He turned his attention to comparative studies and to fieldwork in Central America and Peru. He became a diplomat and an entrepreneur yet still found time to conduct archaeological investigations in Nicaragua, Honduras, and Peru and to gather ethnographic information on contemporary indigenous peoples in those countries.".
Examines "the story of sports post-9/11, once neutral but now embedded with deference toward the military and police, colliding with the political reawakening of the black athlete in post-Ferguson America"--
From 1929 to the latest issue, American Literature has been the foremost journal expressing the findings of those who study our national literature. The journal has published the best work of literary historians, critics, and bibliographers, ranging from the founders of the discipline to the best current critics and researchers. The longevity of this excellence lends a special distinction to the articles in American Literature. Presented in order of their first appearance, the articles in each volume constitute a revealing record of developing insights and important shifts of critical emphasis. Each article has opened a fresh line of inquiry, established a fresh perspective on a familiar topic, or settled a question that engaged the interest of experts. "The articles in each volume are presented in the order of their first appearance in American Literature and each opens a fresh line of inquiry, establishes a fresh perspective on a familiar topic, or settles a question that engaged the interest of experts. The selections are the most enduring work still useful for the study and teaching of important literary figures, or of an intellectual movement, motif, or genre. They represent the full range of thought from the scholarship that created the discipline and upon which much of the current work rests."--Dorys Crow Grover, Western American Literature Partial Contents Poe as Social Critic (1934)/Ernest Marchand Edgar Allan Poe: A Crisis in the History of American Obscurantism (1937)/Yvor Winters Poe and the Chess Automaton (1939)/W. K. Wimsatt, Jr. The Refrain in Poe's Poetry (1953)/Anthony Caputi Poe's Sense of an Ending (1973)/Paul John Eakin "The language of the cipher": Interpretation in "The Gold Bug" (1982)/Michael Williams The Psychology of "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" (1982)/ J. A. Leo Lemay Poe's Re-Vision: The Recovery of the Second Story (1987)/Cynthia S. Jordan
Which cultural values, beliefs, and attitudes best promote democracy, social justice, and prosperity? How can we use the forces that shape cultural change, such as religion, education, and political leadership, to promote these values in the Third World--and for underachieving minorities in the First World? In this book, Lawrence E. Harrison offers intriguing answers to these questions, in a valuable follow-up to his acclaimed Culture Matters. Drawing on a three-year research project that explored the cultural values of dozens of nations--from Botswana, Sweden, and India to China, Egypt, and Chile--Harrison offers a provocative look at values around the globe, revealing how each nation's culture has propelled or retarded their political and economic progress. The book presents 25 factors that operate very differently in cultures prone to progress and those that resist it, including one's influence over destiny, the importance attached to education, the extent to which people identify with and trust others, and the role of women in society. Harrison pulls no punches, and many of his findings are controversial. Contradicting the arguments of multiculturalists, this book contends that when it comes to promoting human progress, some cultures are clearly more effective than others. It convincingly shows which values, beliefs, and attitudes work and how we can foster them. "Harrison takes up the question that is at the center of politics today: Can we self-consciously change cultures so they encourage development and modernization?" --David Brooks, New York Times "I can think of no better entrance to the topic, both for what it teaches and the way it invites and prepares the reader to continue. A gateway study." --David S. Landes, author of The Wealth and Poverty of Nations
Radical History Review presents innovative scholarship and commentary that looks critically at the past and its history from a non-sectarian left perspective.
A lively history of American journalism from the colonial era to the present day

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