Makers of the Media Mind is a collection of analytical essays focusing on the most important and original ideas contributed to the field of mass communication by journalism educators. Divided into six sections representing the most prominent areas of specialization in the field, this text serves two significant purposes: first, it acquaints readers with the lives of preeminent journalism educators; second, it provides concise discussions and evaluations of the most compelling ideas those educators have to offer. The editor of, and contributors to, this text contend that ideas cannot be appreciated fully without an understanding of the creators of those same ideas. They hope that this volume's coverage of "creators" as well as concepts will demonstrate that journalism education has played a critical role in the making of the "media mind."
First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
This highly interpretive and eminently readable study of the Supreme Court during the period in which Melvin Fuller was Chief Justice offers a complete account of the cases the Court saw during one of the most tumultuous times in U.S. history.
Key Readings in Journalism brings together over thirty essential writings that every student of journalism should know. Designed as a primary text for undergraduate students, each reading was carefully chosen in response to extensive surveys from educators reflecting on the needs of today’s journalism classroom. Readings range from critical and historical studies of journalism, such as Walter Lippmann’s Public Opinion and Michael Schudson’s Discovering the News, to examples of classic reporting, such as Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward’s All the President’s Men. They are supplemented by additional readings to broaden the volume’s scope in every dimension, including gender, race, and nationality. The volume is arranged thematically to enable students to think deeply and broadly about journalism—its development, its practice, its key individuals and institutions, its social impact, and its future—and section introductions and headnotes precede each reading to provide context and key points for discussion.
If American journalism were a religion, as it has been called, then its supreme deity would be "objectivity." The high priests of the profession worship the concept, while the iconoclasts of advocacy journalism, new journalism, and cyberjournalism consider objectivity a golden calf. Meanwhile, a groundswell of tabloids and talk shows and the increasing infringement of market concerns make a renewed discussion of the validity, possibility, and aim of objectivity a crucial pursuit. Despite its position as the orbital sun of journalistic ethics, objectivity—until now—has had no historian. David T. Z. Mindich reaches back to the nineteenth century to recover the lost history and meaning of this central tenet of American journalism. His book draws on high profile cases, showing the degree to which journalism and its evolving commitment to objectivity altered–and in some cases limited—the public's understanding of events and issues. Mindich devotes each chapter to a particular component of this ethic–detachment, nonpartisanship, the inverted pyramid style, facticity, and balance. Through this combination of history and cultural criticism, Mindich provides a profound meditation on the structure, promise, and limits of objectivity in the age of cybermedia.
The Year that Defined American Journalism explores the succession of remarkable and decisive moments in American journalism during 1897 – a year of significant transition that helped redefine the profession and shape its modern contours. This defining year featured a momentous clash of paradigms pitting the activism of William Randolph Hearst's participatory 'journalism of action' against the detached, fact-based antithesis of activist journalism, as represented by Adolph Ochs of the New York Times, and an eccentric experiment in literary journalism pursued by Lincoln Steffens at the New York Commercial-Advertiser. Resolution of the three-sided clash of paradigms would take years and result ultimately in the ascendancy of the Times' counter-activist model, which remains the defining standard for mainstream American journalism. The Year That Defined American Journalism introduces the year-study methodology to mass communications research and enriches our understanding of a pivotal moment in media history.
Scripps's daring endeavor to produce a newspaper without advertising
“No writer better articulates ourinterest in the confluence of hope, eccentricity, and the timelessness of the bold and strange than Paul Collins.”—DAVE EGGERS On Long Island, a farmer finds a duck pond turned red with blood. On the Lower East Side, two boys playing at a pier discover a floating human torso wrapped tightly in oilcloth. Blueberry pickers near Harlem stumble upon neatly severed limbs in an overgrown ditch. Clues to a horrifying crime are turning up all over New York, but the police are baffled: There are no witnesses, no motives, no suspects. The grisly finds that began on the afternoon of June 26, 1897, plunged detectives headlong into the era’s most baffling murder mystery. Seized upon by battling media moguls Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst, the case became a publicity circus. Reenactments of the murder were staged in Times Square, armed reporters lurked in the streets of Hell’s Kitchen in pursuit of suspects, and an unlikely trio—a hard-luck cop, a cub reporter, and an eccentric professor—all raced to solve the crime. What emerged was a sensational love triangle and an even more sensational trial: an unprecedented capital case hinging on circumstantial evidence around a victim whom the police couldn’t identify with certainty, and who the defense claimed wasn’t even dead. The Murder of the Century is a rollicking tale—a rich evocation of America during the Gilded Age and a colorful re-creation of the tabloid wars that have dominated media to this day. From the Hardcover edition.
Reader's Guide Literature in English provides expert guidance to, and critical analysis of, the vast number of books available within the subject of English literature, from Anglo-Saxon times to the current American, British and Commonwealth scene. It is designed to help students, teachers and librarians choose the most appropriate books for research and study.
This companion provides a comprehensive survey of the life, work and legacy of Benjamin Franklin - the oldest, most distinctive, and multifaceted of the founders. Includes contributions from across a range of academic disciplines Combines traditional and cutting-edge scholarship, from accomplished and emerging experts in the field Pays special attention to the American Revolution, the Enlightenment, journalism, colonial American society, and themes of race, class, and gender Places Franklin in the context of recent work in political theory, American Studies, American literature, material culture studies, popular culture, and international relations
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From 1929 to the latest issue, American Literature has been the foremost journal expressing the findings of those who study our national literature. The journal has published the best work of literary historians, critics, and bibliographers, ranging from the founders of the discipline to the best current critics and researchers. The longevity of this excellence lends a special distinction to the articles in American Literature. Presented in order of their first appearance, the articles in each volume constitute a revealing record of developing insights and important shifts of critical emphasis. Each article has opened a fresh line of inquiry, established a fresh perspective on a familiar topic, or settled a question that engaged the interest of experts. "The articles in each volume are presented in the order of their first appearance in American Literature and each opens a fresh line of inquiry, establishes a fresh perspective on a familiar topic, or settles a question that engaged the interest of experts. The selections are the most enduring work still useful for the study and teaching of important literary figures, or of an intellectual movement, motif, or genre. They represent the full range of thought from the scholarship that created the discipline and upon which much of the current work rests."--Dorys Crow Grover, Western American Literature Partial Contents Poe as Social Critic (1934)/Ernest Marchand Edgar Allan Poe: A Crisis in the History of American Obscurantism (1937)/Yvor Winters Poe and the Chess Automaton (1939)/W. K. Wimsatt, Jr. The Refrain in Poe's Poetry (1953)/Anthony Caputi Poe's Sense of an Ending (1973)/Paul John Eakin "The language of the cipher": Interpretation in "The Gold Bug" (1982)/Michael Williams The Psychology of "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" (1982)/ J. A. Leo Lemay Poe's Re-Vision: The Recovery of the Second Story (1987)/Cynthia S. Jordan
"Although Squier is best known today for the classic book he coauthored with Edwin H. Davis, Ancient Monuments of the Mississippi Valley, Terry A. Barnhart shows that Squier's fieldwork and interpretive contributions to archaeology and anthropology continued over the next three decades. He turned his attention to comparative studies and to fieldwork in Central America and Peru. He became a diplomat and an entrepreneur yet still found time to conduct archaeological investigations in Nicaragua, Honduras, and Peru and to gather ethnographic information on contemporary indigenous peoples in those countries.".
Philip Freneau was a poet, editor, and mariner. A graduate of Princeton, he was the roommate of James Madison and a classmate of Hugh Henry Brackenridge and Aaron Burr. When the colonies rebelled against England, he supported his newly born nation as a privateer, spending some time in a British prison as a result. He also served, more effectively, as “the poet of the Revolution.” Later he became the journalistic voice of the democrats. Ardently devoted to liberty, he believed himself to be a defender of the common man, for whom he fought selflessly and often vitriolicly throughout his life. In newspapers such as The Freeman’s Journal, The New York Daily Advertiser, The National Gazette, The Jersey Chronicle, and The Time-Piece, he published articles, letters, and poems, instructing the citizens of the new Republic about their rights, and attacking those who, he believed, were infringing on those rights. In the midst of the controversy in which he was so often involved, he also found time to write a small body of poetry whose sensitivity and beauty mark him as the poetic equal of his European contemporaries, and, in fact, as a precursor of the new Romantic movement In Philip Freneau: Champion of Democracy Jacob Axelrad provides a detailed biography of this pensman of the Revolution and early Republic. He gives a sympathetic, imaginative, perceptive, yet objective interpretation of Freneau and his place in history, and at the same time he presents a delightfully readable and clear picture of the period during which the poet lived. These pages not only re-create the battles between Whig and Tory, federalist and democrat, but they also are alive with the activities and philosophies of the men who made American history. James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, George Washington, John Adams, James Monroe go about the business of creating and shaping a new country, and as they do, they move into and out of the life of the poet of Monmouth, influencing him in a variety of ways. Above all, Axelrad brings to life for the reader the man Freneau: simple, direct, often uncritical in his devotion to the cause he believed in; courageous in sustaining his stand against strong opposition; disillusioned and pessimistic about human nature, yet boldly optimistic about the future of humanity and of his country. And always behind the furor the reader is aware of the man struggling to provide a living for himself and his family, and never quite succeeding.
Planning in the USA is a comprehensive introduction to the policies, theory and practice of planning. outlining land use, urban planning and environmental protection policies, this fully illustrated book explains the nature of the planning process and the way in which policy issues are identified, defined and approached.Planning in the USA offers a detailed account of urbanization in the USA. Focussing on policies relating to land use, urban planning and environmental protection, Barry Cullingworth reveals the problematic nature and limitations of the planning process, the fallibility of experts, and difficulties facing policy-makers in their search for solutions.Coverage includes:Land Use Regulation Transport, Housing and Community Development Public Attitudes to Planning Property Rights Environmental Planning and PoliciesGrowth Management Planning and Governance Planning problems are seldom easily solved. Barry Cullingworth's Planning in the USA is an essential book for students and planners and all who are concerned with the nature of contemporary urban and environmental problems.
Which cultural values, beliefs, and attitudes best promote democracy, social justice, and prosperity? How can we use the forces that shape cultural change, such as religion, education, and political leadership, to promote these values in the Third World--and for underachieving minorities in the First World? In this book, Lawrence E. Harrison offers intriguing answers to these questions, in a valuable follow-up to his acclaimed Culture Matters. Drawing on a three-year research project that explored the cultural values of dozens of nations--from Botswana, Sweden, and India to China, Egypt, and Chile--Harrison offers a provocative look at values around the globe, revealing how each nation's culture has propelled or retarded their political and economic progress. The book presents 25 factors that operate very differently in cultures prone to progress and those that resist it, including one's influence over destiny, the importance attached to education, the extent to which people identify with and trust others, and the role of women in society. Harrison pulls no punches, and many of his findings are controversial. Contradicting the arguments of multiculturalists, this book contends that when it comes to promoting human progress, some cultures are clearly more effective than others. It convincingly shows which values, beliefs, and attitudes work and how we can foster them. "Harrison takes up the question that is at the center of politics today: Can we self-consciously change cultures so they encourage development and modernization?" --David Brooks, New York Times "I can think of no better entrance to the topic, both for what it teaches and the way it invites and prepares the reader to continue. A gateway study." --David S. Landes, author of The Wealth and Poverty of Nations
The Future of Business—Annual Review 1980/81: Practical Issues is comprised of five essays that examine the opportunities and problems facing business, and their relation to society. The five essays are entitled ""The World of Work Gets Wider and Wilder,"" ""Business Has Failed to Explain Itself,"" ""Changing Demographics and How They Affect the Future of Business,"" ""The Future of Multinational Business,"" and ""Are Material Resources a Restraint on Economic Growth?"" Gus Tyler's ""The World of Work Gets Wider and Wilder"" examines the make-up of the constantly expanding work forces of the past. George Hammond's ""Business Has Failed to Explain Itself"" looks 200 years back to the start of modern commercialism and to the Industrial Revolution. Lawrence Franko's ""The Future of Multinational Business"" takes a substantive look at both American and non-American multinationals. James Hyatt's ""Changing Demographics and How They Affect the Future of Business"" looks at demographic factors involving business. Lastly, Professor Beckerman's ""Are Material Resources a Restraint on Economic Growth?"" describes why avaricious human beings will continue to eat, build, and multiply. He questions the prophecies of Thomas Malthus by asserting ""...we are not going to starve to death anytime soon."" This book will be useful for readers with interests in the exciting problems addressed by the five essays.
Beyond the Liberal Consensus is a broad survey of the recent political history of the United States for students and others interested in contemporary America. In looking at the Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan and Bush administrations, it focuses on three principal themes: changes in party politics and domestic policy; political debate over foreign affairs; and the country's shifting economic fortunes.
This second edition has been updated to take account of recent historical research into the period, including up-to-date interpretations relating to the Cuban Missile Crisis. The major issues surrounding the origins of the Cold War and its subsequent escalation into a global power struggle between the United States and the Soviet Union, are examined through an accessible narrative and comprehensive selection of sources. The author also provides an analysis of the extent to which the Cold War had an impact on America's political institutions and society. The revised study guides provide a firm basis for answering differentiated source-based and extended writing questions.

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