The use of Virtual Worlds (VWs) has increased in the last decade. VWs are used for communication, education, community building, creative arts, and more. A good deal of research has been conducted into learning and VWs, but other areas remain ripe for investigation. Factors from technological platforms to the nature and conventions of the communities that use VWs must be considered, in order to achieve the best possible interaction between virtual spaces and their users. Making Sense of Space focuses on the background to these issues, describing a range of case studies conducted by the authors. The book investigates the innovative and creative ways designers employ VWs for research, performance-making, and audience engagement. Secondly, it looks into how educators use these spaces to support their teaching practice. Lastly, the book examines the potential of VWs as new methods of communication, and the ways they are changing our perception of reality. This book is structured into four chapters. An introduction provides a history and outline of important themes for VWs, and subsequent chapters consider the design of virtual spaces, experience of virtual spaces, and communication in virtual spaces. Written by two experienced academics and practitioners in the field, offering different perspectives Uses a multidisciplinary approach, drawing on: education; scenography; performance studies; disaster management; and computer science Provides multiple viewpoints on the topic, gained through interviews and contributions from a range of experts, as well as several co-authored chapters
Digital Participation through Social Living Labs connects two largely separate debates: On the one hand, high speed internet access and associated technologies are often heralded as a means to bring about not only connectivity, but also innovation, economic development, new jobs, and regional prosperity. On the other hand, community development research has established that access by itself is necessary but not sufficient to foster digital participation for the broadest possible range of individuals. Edited by leading scholars from the fields of education, youth studies, urban informatics, librarianship, communication technology, and digital media studies, this book is positioned as a link to connect these debates. It brings together an international collection of empirically grounded case studies by researchers and practitioners from diverse backgrounds. They advance knowledge that fosters digital participation by identifying the specific digital needs, issues and practices of different types of communities as they seek to take advantage of access to digital technologies. Collectively, these cases propose new ways for enabling residents to develop their digital confidence and skills both at home and in their local community, particularly through a ‘social living labs’ approach. The book is organised around key focus areas: digital skills enhancement, youth entrepreneurship, connected learning, community digital storytelling, community-led digital initiatives and policy development. Highlights that high speed internet is necessary that high speed internet access is necessary but not sufficient to resolve digital divides and foster social inclusion; Brings together international, empirically grounded case studies to identify digital needs, issues and practices of different communities, and contextualises these with expert comment; Presents contributions from multiple disciplines, with most chapters incorporating more than one disciplinary background; Gives insight on the place of the digital in contemporary society; Illustrates the innovative potential of social living labs to foster digital learning and participation in a variety of community contexts.
Intangible value leads to new insights and ideas, and higher levels of creativity and innovative thinking. Personal knowledge capital focuses on the knowledge worker, knowledge creation, and third generation knowledge management. A focus on the ‘inner and outer’ aspects of personal knowledge capital creates a balanced approach in order to produce creative solutions. As such this forms part of a synthesis of mind versus body thinking in relation to knowledge creation theory within knowledge management. This title is divided into two sections: the inner and outer path. The inner path focuses on tacit knowledge in knowledge creation, and highlights the importance of inner value, resulting in a model for personal knowledge awareness. The outer path explores how to effectively communicate and exploit knowledge in a modern business world, both online and offline. This section focuses on valuing intangibles including social capital, relationships and trust, exploring community, conversation, infrastructure and ecologies for a web world. You can manage your own assets through your communities and networks, exploiting the latest technologies around you. Examines know-how, tacit knowledge, and emotional and cognitive knowledge Links social capital to web technologies to create innovative frameworks, tools and models Puts forward tools and mechanisms supported by research, which can be used for the design of a knowledge infrastructure
The End of Wisdom? The Future of Libraries in a Digital Age assembles opinion pieces, forecasts, strategy options, and case studies from leading worldwide politicians, academics, educators, authors, publishers, captains of industry, senior public sector workers, library directors, IT gurus and other key players in the field of information provision who discuss their views on the hypothesis surrounding the "end of libraries" and the "death of books." The contributions – ranging in length from 500 to 2000 words are analyzed and summarized to create a rich picture of current trends and likely futures for libraries of all types, with digital options discussed in detail. Focuses on the key issue facing library and information services for the foreseeable future Takes a much broader view by asking a wide range of key people and representative stakeholders and user groups for their view of the future of libraries of all kinds Presents a comprehensive analysis of likely directions and options for libraries, library managers, and users Includes a route map for the future Builds on the successful approaches adopted in A Handbook of Digital Library Economics and Libraries and Society
Unplugging the Classroom: Teaching with Technologies to Promote Students' Lifelong Learning provides techniques to help teaching and learning in an age where technology untethers instruction from the classroom, from semester seat-time, and from a single source of expertise. The book brings together researchers and practitioners from diverse academic fields, including library perspectives, and presents interdisciplinary discussions from both theoretical and applied areas. It is unique in its goal of bringing educators and librarians together to explore the challenges that are faced by students and faculty in any time, any place, any path, and any pace learning. In spite of the fact that the mobile revolution has definitively arrived, students and faculty alike aren’t ready to make the leap to mobile learning. The pressures of technological advances, along with the changing nature of learning, will demand increasingly profound changes in education. Researchers have begun to address this issue, but the revolution in mobile communication has not been accompanied by a concomitant growth in pedagogical resources for educators and students. More importantly, such growth needs to be under-girded by sound learning theories and examples of best practice. Provides a hands-on resource useful to both novices and experts for technology-enabled teaching and learning Gives both discipline-specific and cross-disciplinary perspectives Discusses discipline-specific mobile applications Offers an opportunity to meet the needs of contemporary learners and foster their competencies as lifelong learners Addresses emerging issues in technology and pedagogy
Social software has taken the Internet by storm, fuelling huge growth in collaborative authoring platforms (such as blogs, wikis and podcasts) and massive expansion in social networking communities. These technologies have generated an unprecedented level of consumer participation and it is now time for businesses to embrace them as part of their own information and knowledge management strategies. Enterprise 2.0 is one of the first books to explain the impact that social software will have inside the corporate firewall, and ultimately how staff will work together in the future. Niall Cook helps you to navigate this emerging landscape and introduces the key concepts that make up 'Enterprise 2.0'. The 4Cs model at the heart of the book uses practical examples from well known companies in a range of industry sectors to illustrate how to apply Enterprise 2.0 to encourage communication, cooperation, collaboration and connection between employees and customers in your own company. Erudite, well-researched and highly readable, this book is essential for anyone involved in knowledge, information and library management, as well as those implementing social software tools inside organizations. It will also appeal to marketing, advertising, public relations and internal communications professionals who need to exploit the opportunities social software offers for significant business impact and competitive advantage.
The principle of personalisation appears in a range of current debates among design professionals, healthcare providers and educationalists about the implications of new technologies and approaches to consumer sovereignty for 'mass' provision. The potential of new technologies implies systems of provision that offer bespoke support to their users, tailoring services and experiences to suit individual needs. The assumption that individual choice automatically increases wellbeing has underlain the re-design of public services. Ubiquitous personalisation in screen-based environments gives individuals the sense that their personality is reflected back at them. Advances in Artificial Intelligence mean our personal intelligent agents have begun to acquire personality. Given its prevalence, it is appropriate to identify the scope of this phenomenon that is altering our relationship to the 'non-human' world. This book presents taxonomy of personalisation, and its potential consequences for the design profession as well as its ethical and political dimensions through a collection of essays from a range of academic perspectives. The thought-provoking introduction, conclusion and nine chapters present a well-balanced mixture of in-depth literature review and practical examples to deepen our understanding of the consequences of personalisation for our professional and personal lives. Collectively, this book points towards the implications of personalisation for design-led social innovation. This will be valuable reading for professionals in the design industry and health provision, as well as students of product design, fashion and sociology.
This book examines various views and perspectives on digitisation. Topics covered include electronic theses, search engine technology, digitisation in Africa, citation indexing, reference services, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition, new media and scholarly publishing. The final chapter explores virtual libraries, and poses some interesting questions for possible futures. The book will be of particular interest to information professionals, educators, librarians, academics and I.T. and knowledge experts.
Universities are social universes in their own right. They are the site of multiple, complex and diverse social relations, identities, communities, knowledges and practices. At the heart of this book are people enrolling at university for the first time and entering into the broad variety of social relations and contexts entailed in their ‘coming to know’ at, of and through university. For some time now the terms ‘transition to university’ and ‘first-year experience’ have been at the centre of discussion and discourse at, and about, Australian universities. For those university administrators, researchers and teachers involved, this focus has been framed by a number of interlinked factors ranging from social justice concerns to the hard economic realities confronting the contemporary corporatising university. In the midst of changing global economic conditions affecting the international student market, as well as shifting domestic politics surrounding university funding, the equation of dollars with student numbers has remained a constant, and has kept universities’ attention on the current ‘three Rs’ of higher education — recruitment, retention, reward — and, in particular, on the critical phase of students’ entry into the tertiary institution environment. By recasting ‘the transition to university’ as simultaneously and necessarily entailing a transition of university — indeed universities — and of their many and varied constitutive relations, structures and practices, the contributors to this book seek to reconceptualise the ‘first-year experience’ in terms of multiple and dynamic processes of dialogue and exchange amongst all participants. They interrogate taken-for-granted understandings of what ‘the university’ is, and consider what universities might yet become.
Following an earlier NRC workshop on public response to alerts and warnings delivered to mobile devices, a related workshop was held on February 28 and 29, 2012 to look at the role of social media in disaster response. This was one of the first workshops convened to look systematically at the use of social media for alerts and warnings-an event that brought together social science researchers, technologists, emergency management professionals, and other experts on how the public and emergency managers use social media in disasters.In addition to exploring how officials monitor social media, as well as the resulting privacy considerations, the workshop focused on such topics as: what is known about how the public responds to alerts and warnings; the implications of what is known about such public responses for the use of social media to provide alerts and warnings to the public; and approaches to enhancing the situational awareness of emergency managers. Public Response to Alerts and Warnings Using Social Media: Report of a Workshop on Current Knowledge and Research Gaps summarizes presentations made by invited speakers, other remarks by workshop participants, and discussions during parallel breakout sessions. It also points to potential topics for future research, as well as possible areas for future research investment, and it describes some of the challenges facing disaster managers who are seeking to incorporate social media into regular practice.
Data information literacy is introduced as a new area of opportunity for librarians seeking to educate the next generation of scholars about best practices when working with research data in a way that is sustainable over the long term.
The concept of ‘live’ has changed as a consequence of mediated culture. Interaction may occur in real time, but not necessarily in shared physical spaces with others. The Digital Evolution of Live Music considers notions of live music in time and space as influenced by digital technology. This book presents the argument that live music is a special case in digital experience due to its liminal status between mind and body, words and feelings, sight and sound, virtual and real. Digital live music occupies a multimodal role in a cultural contextual landscape shaped by technological innovation. The book consists of three sections. The first section looks at fan perspectives, digital technology and the jouissance of live music and music festival fans. The second section discusses music in popular culture, exploring YouTube and live music video culture and gaming soundtracks, followed by the concluding section which investigates the future of live music and digital culture. gives perspectives on the function of live music in digital culture and the role of digital in live music focuses on the interaction between live and digital music takes the discussion of live music beyond economics and marketing, to the cultural and philosophical implications of digital culture for the art includes interviews with producers and players in the digital world of music production furthers debate by looking at access to digital music via social media, websites, and applications that recognise the impact of digital culture on the live music experience
Tales from the Development Frontier presents analytical reviews and case studies that show how selected countries have developed light manufacturing to create jobs and foster prosperity. The focus is on China, a current powerhouse in light manufacturing, but the volume also analyzes a selection of countries in Africa and Asia.
Analyzing the relationship between digital technologies and society this book explores a wide range of complex social issues emerging in a new digital space. Itexamines both the vexing dilemmas with a critical eye as well as prompting readers to think constructively and strategically about exciting possibilities.
Providing a compelling analysis of debates in and about the modern city, this book draws upon architecture, history, literary studies, new media and sociology to explore the multiple connections between location, speech and the emerging modern metropolis. It concludes by reflecting on public speaking in the construction of the virtual city.
Drawing upon the author’s on going research into information literacy, Information Literacy Landscapes explores the nature of the phenomenon from a socio-cultural perspective, which offers a more holistic approach to understanding information literacy as a catalyst for learning. This perspective emphasizes the dynamic relationship between learner and environment in the construction of knowledge. The approach underlines the importance of contextuality, through which social, cultural and embodied factors influence formal and informal learning. This book contributes to the understanding of information literacy and its role in formal and informal contexts. Explores the shape of information literacy within education and workplace contexts Introduces a holistic definition of information literacy which has been drawn from empirical studies in the workplace Introduces a range of sensitizing concepts for researchers and practitioners
This important volume by noted Australian learning theorist, Christine Bruce, provides a unique perspective on helping students become successful learners in fluid and fast moving information environments. In answering the question “What should we teach and how, so that our students will use information successfully, creatively, and responsibly in their journey as lifelong learners?” Bruce has created a powerful and extensive examination of how information and disciplinary learning can coexist.

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