A proven program for enhancing students' thinking and comprehension abilities Visible Thinking is a research-based approach to teaching thinking, begun at Harvard's Project Zero, that develops students' thinking dispositions, while at the same time deepening their understanding of the topics they study. Rather than a set of fixed lessons, Visible Thinking is a varied collection of practices, including thinking routines?small sets of questions or a short sequence of steps?as well as the documentation of student thinking. Using this process thinking becomes visible as the students' different viewpoints are expressed, documented, discussed and reflected upon. Helps direct student thinking and structure classroom discussion Can be applied with students at all grade levels and in all content areas Includes easy-to-implement classroom strategies The book also comes with a DVD of video clips featuring Visible Thinking in practice in different classrooms.
"Visible Thinking is a research-based approach to teaching thinking that develops students' thinking dispositions, while at the same time deepening their understanding of the topics they study. Rather than a set of fixed lessons, Visible Thinking is an extensive and adaptable collection of practices that include thinking routines and the documentation of student thinking. The routines are a central element of the practical, functional and accessible nature of Visible Thinking. Thinking routines are easy to use mini-strategies that are repeatedly used in the classroom. They are a small set of questions or a short sequence of steps that can be used across various grade levels and content. Each routine targets a different type of thinking and by bringing their own content, teachers can integrate the routines into the fabric of their classrooms. Thinking Routines help direct student thinking and structure classroom discussion. Thinking becomes visible as the students' different viewpoints are expressed, documented, discussed and reflected upon"--
What does it really mean to be intelligent? Ron Ritchhart presents a new and powerful view of intelligence that moves beyond ability to focus on cognitive dispositions such as curiosity, skepticism, and open mindedness. Arguing persuasively for this new conception of intelligence, the author uses vivid classroom vignettes to explore the foundations of intellectual character and describe how teachers can enculturate productive patterns of thinking in their students. "Intellectual Character" presents illustrative, inspiring stories of exemplary teachers to help show how intellectual traits and thinking dispositions can be developed and cultivated in students to promote successful learning. This vital book provides a model of authentic and powerful teaching and offers practical strategies for creating classroom environments that support thinking.
Discover why and how schools must become places where thinking is valued, visible, and actively promoted As educators, parents, and citizens, we must settle for nothing less than environments that bring out the best in people, take learning to the next level, allow for great discoveries, and propel both the individual and the group forward into a lifetime of learning. This is something all teachers want and all students deserve. In Creating Cultures of Thinking: The 8 Forces We Must Master to Truly Transform Our Schools, Ron Ritchhart, author of Making Thinking Visible, explains how creating a culture of thinking is more important to learning than any particular curriculum and he outlines how any school or teacher can accomplish this by leveraging 8 cultural forces: expectations, language, time, modeling, opportunities, routines, interactions, and environment. With the techniques and rich classroom vignettes throughout this book, Ritchhart shows that creating a culture of thinking is not about just adhering to a particular set of practices or a general expectation that people should be involved in thinking. A culture of thinking produces the feelings, energy, and even joy that can propel learning forward and motivate us to do what at times can be hard and challenging mental work.
It's one of the great mysteries of teaching: Why do some students "get it" and some students don't? In this book, Betty K. Garner focuses on why students struggle and what teachers can do to help them become self-directed learners. Difficulty reading, remembering, paying attention, or following directions are not the reasons students fail but symptoms of the true problem: underdeveloped cognitive structures--the mental processes necessary to connect new information with prior knowledge; organize information into patterns and relationships; formulate rules that make information processing automatic, fast, and predictable; and abstract generalizable principles that allow them to transfer and apply learning. Each chapter focuses on a key cognitive structure and uses real-life accounts to illustrate how learners construct meaning by using recognition, memorization, conservation of constancy, classification, spatial orientation, temporal orientation, and metaphorical thinking. The author's simple techniques stress reflective awareness and visualization. It's by helping students to be conscious of what their senses are telling them, encouraging them to visualize the information for processing, and then prompting them to ask questions and figure out solutions on their own that teachers can best help students develop the tools they need to * Gather, organize, and make sense of information, * Become cognitively engaged and internally motivated to achieve, and * Experience learning as a dynamic process of creating and changing. Suggestions for using these techniques in daily classroom practice, advice on lesson planning for cognitive engagement, and guidelines for conducting reflective research expand this book's practical applications. Use it not only to help struggling students break through hidden barriers but to empower all students with tools that will last a lifetime.
Seeing is believing with this interactive approach to math instruction Do you ever wish your students could read each other’s thoughts? Now they can—and so can you! This newest book by veteran mathematics educators provides instructional strategies for maximizing students’ mathematics comprehension by integrating visual thinking into the classroom. Included are numerous grade-specific sample problems for teaching essential concepts such as number sense, fractions, and estimation. Among the many benefits of visible thinking are: Interactive student-to-student learning Increased class participation Development of metacognitive thinking and problem-solving skills
In exploring the process of teaching for understanding as teachers practice it, this monograph succeeds, as few do, in providing different ways of entering a teachers world. Building on teachers' 'inside knowledge,' the authors engage, provoke and coach-in just the right ways-so that I, as a teacher, excited by these new ideas, want the semester to begin tomorrow!?Ann Lieberman, Teachers College, Columbia UniversityThis practical, step-by-step guide to the process of Teaching for Understanding. walks teachers through the four critical steps of this highly successful process. Classroom examples, tips, and worksheets help clarify the process. It shows how to choose topics that engage students? interest and connect readily to other subjects, set coherent unit and course goals, create activities that both develop and demonstrate students? understanding, and improve student performance by providing continual feedback.The how-to companion to Teaching for Understanding: A Framework, edited by Martha Stone Wiske.Contents1. What This Guide Is (and Isn't)2. Understanding Understanding3. The Teaching for Understanding Framework4. Generative Topics5. Understanding Goals6. Performances of Understanding7. Ongoing Assessment8. Tips and Tools for Planning and Teaching9. Teaching for Understanding and Other Educational PracticesTina Blythe is a project coordinator for Project Zero at Harvard University?s Graduate School of Education.
A new approach to contemporary documentation and learning What is learning? How do we look for, capture, reflect on, and share learning to foster meaningful and active engagement? This vital resource helps educators answer these questions. A Guide to Documenting Learning facilitates student-driven learning and helps teachers reflect on their own learning and classroom practice. This unique how-to book Explains the purposes and different types of documentation Teaches different “LearningFlow” systems to help educators integrate documentation throughout the curriculum Provides authentic examples of documentation in real classrooms Is accompanied by a robust companion website where readers can find even more documentation examples and video tutorials
A progressive, research-based approach for making learning visible Based on the Reggio Emilia approach to learning, Visible Learners highlights learning through interpreting objects and artifacts, group learning, and documentation to make students' learning evident to teachers. Visible classrooms are committed to five key principles: that learning is purposeful, social, emotional, empowering, and representational. The book includes visual essays, key practices, classroom and examples. Show how to make learning happen in relation to others, spark emotional connections, give students power over their learning, and express ideas in multiple ways Illustrate Reggio-inspired principles and approaches via quotes, photos, student and teacher reflections, and examples of student work Offer a new way to enhance learning using progressive, research-based practices for increasing collaboration and critical thinking in and outside the classroom Visible Learners asks that teachers look beyond surface-level to understand who students are, what they come to know, and how they come to know it.
Slow Looking provides a robust argument for the importance of slow looking in learning environments both general and specialized, formal and informal, and its connection to major concepts in teaching, learning, and knowledge. A museum-originated practice increasingly seen as holding wide educational benefits, slow looking contends that patient, immersive attention to content can produce active cognitive opportunities for meaning-making and critical thinking that may not be possible though high-speed means of information delivery. Addressing the multi-disciplinary applications of this purposeful behavioral practice, this book draws examples from the visual arts, literature, science, and everyday life, using original, real-world scenarios to illustrate the complexities and rewards of slow looking.
This book presents an innovative approach to teaching that helps students acquire and use knowledge in ways that go beyond rote memorization of facts and figures--to develop a level of understanding that will serve them well throughout their lives. Based on a six-year collaborative research project of school teachers and researchers from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, the book describes what teaching for understanding looks like in the classroom, and examines how teachers have learned to use it. Part One: Foundations of Teaching for Understanding 1. Why Do We Need a Pedagogy of Understanding? Vito Perrone 2. What is Understanding? David Perkins Part Two: Teaching for Understanding in the Classroom 3. What is Teaching for Understanding? Martha Stone Wiske 4. How Do Teachers Learn to Teach for Understanding? Martha Stone Wiske, Karen Hammerness, Daniel Gray Wilson 5. How Does Teaching for Understanding Look in Practice? Ron Ritchart, Martha Stone Wiske, Eric Buchovecky, Lois Hetland Part Three: Students' Understanding in the Classroom 6. What Are the Qualities of Understanding? Veronica Boix Mansilla, Howard Gardner 7. How Do Students Demonstrate Understanding? Lois Hetland, Karen Hammerness, Chris Unger, Daniel Gray Wilson 8. What Do Students in Teaching for Understanding Classrooms Understand? Karen Hammerness, Rosario Jaramillo, Chris Unger, Daniel Gray Wilson 9. What Do Students Think About Understanding? Chris Unger and Daniel Gray Wilson with Rosario Jaramillo and Roger Dempsey Part Four: Promoting Teaching for Understanding 10. How Can We Prepare New Teachers? Vito Perrone 11. How Can Teaching for Understanding Be ExtAnded in Schools? Martha Stone Wiske, Lois Hetland, Eric Buchovecky Conclusion: Melding Progressive and Traditional Perspectives Howard Gardner Martha Stone Wiske is a lecturer and researcher at the Harvard Graduate School of Education where she co-directs the Educational Techono
What are "essential questions," and how do they differ from other kinds of questions? What's so great about them? Why should you design and use essential questions in your classroom? Essential questions (EQs) help target standards as you organize curriculum content into coherent units that yield focused and thoughtful learning. In the classroom, EQs are used to stimulate students' discussions and promote a deeper understanding of the content. Whether you are an Understanding by Design (UbD) devotee or are searching for ways to address standards--local or Common Core State Standards--in an engaging way, Jay McTighe and Grant Wiggins provide practical guidance on how to design, initiate, and embed inquiry-based teaching and learning in your classroom. Offering dozens of examples, the authors explore the usefulness of EQs in all K-12 content areas, including skill-based areas such as math, PE, language instruction, and arts education. As an important element of their backward design approach to designing curriculum, instruction, and assessment, the authors *Give a comprehensive explanation of why EQs are so important; *Explore seven defining characteristics of EQs; *Distinguish between topical and overarching questions and their uses; *Outline the rationale for using EQs as the focal point in creating units of study; and *Show how to create effective EQs, working from sources including standards, desired understandings, and student misconceptions. Using essential questions can be challenging--for both teachers and students--and this book provides guidance through practical and proven processes, as well as suggested "response strategies" to encourage student engagement. Finally, you will learn how to create a culture of inquiry so that all members of the educational community--students, teachers, and administrators--benefit from the increased rigor and deepened understanding that emerge when essential questions become a guiding force for learners of all ages.
Develop students' number sense and mathematical understanding with these hands-on lessons exploring place value, statistics, mesurement, estimation, calculators, computation, and problem solving. Lessons can supplement your existing curriculum or form the basis for a new one. This book includes blackline masters, instructional techniques, and school-wide projects.
Questions and questioning are key skills in successful learning. The original Q Tasks was instrumental in showing teachers how to give students the tools they need to develop their own questions and build critical thinking and inquiry skills. This new, totally revised edition continues to nurture and advance these crucial skills, and also offers Q-task extensions that introduce digital components that facilitate collaboration and are designed to appeal to tech-savvy students. More than 100 practical, flexible exercises in this remarkable book provide a smorgasbord of choices for teachers to use to help students formulate good questions in an information-rich environment. They put the students at the centre of their own learning as they build the library and research skills that are essential to our information age. Teachers will find innovative ways to help students go beyond memorization and rote learning of facts to focus on personal understanding, and true ownership of the learning experience.
Empower students with proven strategies for brain-friendly instruction! This revised fourth edition offers more than 1,000 brain research–based teaching strategies along with reflections, affirmations, sidebars, bulleted lists, quotable quotes, and a wealth of instructional tools. The author shows how to improve instructional effectiveness, plan standards-based lessons, and optimize student learning with practical techniques such as: Matching instruction with learners' developmental stages Responding to unique learning styles with differentiated techniques Using assessment as part of instruction Addressing the learning needs of students in poverty Managing students' emotions with music and energizers Practicing positive teaching mind-sets to enhance student results
Develop students’ critical thinking, abstract reasoning, and creative learning skills with concept-based teaching! Take learning beyond the facts with a teaching approach that develops conceptual thinking and problem-solving skills. A Concept-Based curriculum recaptures students’ innate curiosity about the world and provides the thrilling feeling of using one’s mind well. Concept-Based teachers will learn how to: Meet the demands of rigorous academic standards Use the Structure of Knowledge and Process when designing disciplinary units Engage students in inquiry through inductive teaching Identify conceptual lenses and craft quality generalizations
Are you looking for high-impact, research-based strategies to transform your students into high-achieving and inspired learners? In The Strategic Teacher, you'll find a repertoire of strategies designed and proven to meet today's high standards and reach diverse learners. Twenty reliable, flexible strategies (along with dozens of variations) are organized into these groups of instruction: *mastery style to emphasize the development of student memory; *understanding style to expand students' capacities to reason and explain; *self-expressive style to stimulate and nourish students' imaginations and creativity; *interpersonal style to help students find meaning in the relationships they forge as partners and team members, united in the act of learning; and *four-style strategies that integrate all four styles. To guide teachers in delivering content to students, the authors started with the best research-based teaching and learning strategies and created a tool called the Strategic Dashboard. The dashboard provides information about each teaching strategy in a concise, visual profile; it is also designed to document how you incorporate current, highly respected research into your instructional plans. For each strategy, you'll find the following information: *a brief introduction to the strategy; *an example of a teacher using the strategy in the classroom; *the research base supporting the strategy and how the strategy benefits students; *how to implement the strategy using a list of clear steps; *guidance through the planning process, providing steps, examples, and suggestions for designing superior lessons; and *additional tools, strategies, and resources for adapting and expanding the use of each strategy. The authors have combined their years of research and practice to deliver reliable, high-impact, flexible teaching and learning strategies grounded in current, highly regarded research to teachers at all levels of experience.
A resource for middle and high school teachers offers activities, lesson plans, experiments, demonstrations, and games for teaching physics, chemistry, biology, and the earth and space sciences.

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