About this Book I wrote this book to help students who are about to start their first project. It provides guidance on how to organise your work so that you achieve your agreed objective. The advice is based on experience gained from supervising more than 50 successful student projects, in both engineering and computer science, during the last 10 years. Projects have varied in duration from 120 hour final year undergraduate projects, through 800 hour MSc projects and up to 5000 hour PhD student research projects. It is my experience that almost all students have the technical background, to a greater or lesser extent, to complete their assigned project but that a disappointingly large number lack the basic organisational framework. Once they are introduced to the rudiments of project management then they are better equipped to control their own progress. They can also concentrate their efforts more effectively on the technical challenges which they will inevitably meet. Of course you can improve your skills solely on the basis of personal experience but you are more likely to achieve your objectives, in a timely manner, with the help of an experienced guide. That is what I have tried to include within this book. It contains advice on how to solve some of the organisational challenges common to all projects so that you can successfully complete your project.
"An excellent sourcebook for student project work in computing." (Prof Darren Dalcher, Middlesex University) "Contains everything that a student needs to know in order to successfully complete an academic computing project for their degree." (Peter Morris, University of Greenwich) Undertaking a project is a key component of nearly all computing/information systems degree programmes at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Projects in Computing and Information Systems covers the four key aspects of project work (planning, conducting, presenting and taking the project further) in chronological fashion, and provides the reader with the skills to excel in the following essential areas: writing proposals; surveying literature; project management; time management; managing risk; team working; software development; documenting software; report writing; effective presentation. The AUTHOR uses a number of real-life case studies to pass on the experiences of past student projects in order that the reader gets a genuine understanding of how to avoid pitfalls and ensure best practice throughout their own projects. This book is the essential guide for any student undertaking a computing/IS project, and will give them everything they need to achieve outstanding results. Christian Dawson is currently a lecturer at Loughborough University.
Designing and Managing a Research Project: A Business Student’s Guide is a practical, step-by-step guide that shows business students how to successfully conduct a research project, from choosing the topic to presenting the results. The authors have applied their many years of experience in supervising student projects to provide examples of actual research problems and to offer practical solutions. The inclusion of topics such as supervision, group work and ethics, and both qualitative and quantitative data analysis, along with examples from real student research provide a unique perspective. The new Fourth Edition includes broader types of student project examples, such as an Economics thesis, additional international business cases, increased coverage of Questionnaire Design and Institutional Review Boards, and an integrated case throughout the book on “High Performance Shoes” with supporting materials and data.
Introduces you to the basics of project management. This book addresses the needs for an academic student project providing useful hints and guidance. It also describes contexts for project management including coverage of systems development lifecycles (including evolutionary and agile methods), managing change, teamwork and professional ethics.
This book addresses how best to make build vs. buy decisions, and what effect such decisions have on the software development life cycle (SDLC). Offering an integrated approach that includes important management and decision practices, the text explains how to create successful solutions that fit user and customer needs, by mixing different SDLC methodologies. Features: provides concrete examples and effective case studies; focuses on the skills and insights that distinguish successful software implementations; covers management issues as well as technical considerations, including how to deal with political and cultural realities in organizations; identifies many new alternatives for how to manage and model a system using sophisticated analysis tools and advanced management practices; emphasizes how and when professionals can best apply these tools and practices, and what benefits can be derived from their application; discusses searching for vendor solutions, and vendor contract considerations.
MEET YOUR GOALS—ON TIME AND ON BUDGET. How do you rein in the scope of your project when you’ve got a group of demanding stakeholders breathing down your neck? And map out a schedule everyone can stick to? And motivate team members who have competing demands on their time and attention? Whether you’re managing your first project or just tired of improvising, this guide will give you the tools and confidence you need to define smart goals, meet them, and capture lessons learned so future projects go even more smoothly. The HBR Guide to Project Management will help you: • Build a strong, focused team • Break major objectives into manageable tasks • Create a schedule that keeps all the moving parts under control • Monitor progress toward your goals • Manage stakeholders’ expectations • Wrap up your project and gauge its success
Final year projects are an important feature of most undergraduate and postgraduate degrees in the fields of Business Information Technology, Information Systems, Software Engineering and Business Computing. These projects usually involve students in the practical application of theory together with a critical analysis or evaluation of the excecution of their project or of the theory applied. This book is the first to provide detailed guidance and support for students in preparing for, conducting and evaluating a system development project, independent of the development methodology or technical tools to be used.
A very practical, step-by-step guide to career success for those who lack top grades or family connections. Some people graduate from college, and employers covet them: They are the best and the brightest, with stellar grades and great connections, able to land their dream jobs with major corporations right after school. This book is not for those people. In The C Student's Guide to Success, leading advertising executive-and former C student-Ron Bliwas presents a program of ten can't-fail principles for climbing to the top using your brains and talents-rather than family connections or fancy degrees. Bliwas uses real-world stories of business leaders, revealing how they identified and overcame their own weaknesses, and vaulted ahead of peers who had money and family connections. In surveying the come-from-behind success stories of his subjects, Bliwas provides creative, insightful, down-to-earth advice for new graduates, the recently employed, and those with a few false starts under their belt. In ten simple chapters, Bliwas teaches you how to: _ Make the most of many mentors _ Trust your instinct _ Strive to be a better person than employee _ Take responsibility seriously _ Master the art of purposeful learning _ Take advantage of unexpected opportunities _ Sell what you believe _ Go where the stars aren't _ Be a smart risk-taker _ Overcome straight-line thinking Bliwas encourages readers to embrace unconventional strategies, unexpected opportunities, and their own instincts, and to realize that opportunities for career growth exist everywhere-not just on the traditional path to job advancement.
An absolutely essential survival kit for the lost doctoral candidate!Would you like to shorten your Time to Doctorate by at least ONE whole year? We can help you do it!Follow our step-by-step guide to managing your Ph.D. project as a Pro. The book is packed with practical and easy to apply tips about:· How to plan your research and organize your daily tasks· How to choose a topic and an adviser· How to communicate with your adviser in a win-win style· How to complete the doctorate on schedule· How to reduce the stress and increase the joy of staying in a graduate school· Learn from original examples of successful graduates Learn avoid and cope with potential crises in your doctoral program:· Professional crisis· Expectation crisis· Emotional crisis· Survival crisis · “International Student” crisis · Adviser crisis Each potential crisis is explained and treated to help you avoid it or solve it!
Health institutions are investing in and fielding information technology solutions at an unprecedented pace. With the recommendations from the Institute of Medicine around information technology solutions for patient safety, mandates from industry groups such as Leapfrog about using infor mation systems to improve health care, and the move toward evidence based practice, health institutions cannot afford to retain manual practices. The installation of multi-million dollar computerized health systems repre sents the very life blood of contemporary clinical operations and a crucial link to the financial viability of institutions. Yet, the implementation of health information systems is exceptionally complex, expensive and often just plain messy. The need for improvement in the art and science of systems implemen tation is clear: up to 70-80% of information technology installations fail. The reasons are multi-faceted, ranging from the complexity of the diverse workflows being computerized, the intricate nature of health organizations, the knowledge and skills of users to other reasons such as strategies for obtaining key executive support, weaving through the politics peculiar to the institution, and technical facets including the usability of systems. Thus, the art and science of successfully implementing systems remains deeply layered in elusiveness. Still, given the pervasiveness of system implementa tions and the importance of the outcomes, this is a critical topic, especially for nurses and informatics nurse specialists.
This companion to Community Geography: GIS in Action provides the ""how-to"" for teachers seeking to use the book in their classrooms. Fifteen middle school and high school companion lesson plans include: Correlation to national geography, science, and technology standards Required materials and estimated time of completion Authentic assessments Answer keys Lesson introductions and conclusions Teacher tips Evaluation rubrics
This book identifies the skills and strategies which make for success as a postgraduate research student and offers practical advice which can be readily adapted to meet individual needs.
E-LEARNING COMPANION serves as a resource and quick-reference guide for any course that demands technology skills. In addition to helping students adapt previously mastered skills--such as time management, note-taking, and critical thinking--to the online environment, this text shows students how social networking, cloud file storage, wikis, and blogs can be utilized appropriately and effectively in a college course. Technical terminology and how-to tutorials help students become more capable and flexible online learners, and build skills that will support them throughout college and their future careers. The Fourth Edition is fully updated to be current and relevant for today's online learning environments, and also includes new Workplace Applications, and coverage of professional behavior and professional emails. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
Criminological Research for Beginners is a comprehensive and engaging guide to research methods in Criminology. Written specifically for undergraduate students and novice researchers, this book has been designed as a practical guide to planning, conducting, and reporting research in the subject. By first inviting readers to consider the importance of criminological research, the book places related methodology firmly in the context of students’ broader study of Criminology, before moving on to provide a detailed guide to the practical processes of research. It is common for Criminology undergraduates to feel intimidated at the prospect of conducting their own research, and these students typically struggle to see the relevance of research methods to their own studies. This book speaks directly to the needs of such students, and includes contemporary examples and case studies that bring a topic that is often thought of as dry to life, providing a thorough and accessible practical guide that students can return to at each stage of their research, all the way through to their dissertation. This book covers: an examination of the theoretical, political, and ethical debates in criminological research; a complete guide to planning criminological research, assisting student researchers in identifying their research questions, choosing their research methods, and critiquing the available literature; guidance on the practicalities and processes of collecting data, a discussion of the process of analysing data and writing up research, Including an extensive glossary and an integrated companion website with extra examples, exercises, and videos to further develop students’ understanding, this book is essential reading for any undergraduate on a Criminological Research Methods course, or for anyone in need of practical guidance on any or every of the various stages involved in conducting thorough and effective criminological research.
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Want to get boys excited about poetry? Try establishing a wiki-war on the use of form and structure. Or perhaps a podcast to develop close analysis of language. How about getting them blogging about their favourite characters? Based on established principles of the best ways to use ICT in English, this practical resource looks at when and how ICT can be used to engage and inspire students of English, but only when it enhances teaching and learning, never for its own sake. Beginning with an overview of what ICT can offer and how it is changing the way we teach and learn, the authors then give practical examples of activities and ideas to attain key English skills and learning goals in secondary schools. Throughout the book, there are tried-and-tested ideas for tackling the hard-to-teach topics, and there is also a dedicated website with links to useful websites, the authors' favourite tips and downloadable resources.
Designing interesting problems and writing assignments is one ofthe chief tasks of all teachers, but it can be especiallychallenging to translate and apply learning theory, good teachingtechniques, and writing assignments into STEM and otherquantitative disciplines. Student Writing in the QuantitativeDisciplines offers instructors in math-based disciplines meaningfulapproaches to making their coursework richer and more relevant fortheir students, as well as satisfying institutional imperatives forwriting curricula. This important resource provides instructorswith the hands-on skills needed to guide their students in writingwell in quantitative courses at all levels of the collegecurriculum and to promote students' general cognitive andintellectual growth. Comprehensive in scope, the book includes: Ideas for using writing as a means of learning mathematicalconcepts Illustrative examples of effective writing activities andassignments in a number of different genres Assessment criteria and effective strategies for responding tostudents' writing Examples of ways to help students engage in peer review,revision, and resubmission of their written work "Those of us who spend our lives urging faculty in alldisciplines to integrate more writing into their courses havewished for the day when someone like Patrick Bahls would stepforward with a book like this one."—Chris M. Anson, UniversityDistinguished Professor and director, Campus Writing and SpeakingProgram, North Carolina State University "Written by a mathematician, this readable, theoretically soundbook describes practical strategies for teachers in thequantitative sciences to assign and respond to students' writing.It also describes numerous approaches to writing that engagestudents in disciplinary learning, collaborative discovery, andeffective communication."—Art Young, Campbell Professor ofEnglish emeritus, Clemson University "Loaded with practical advice, this timely, important, andengaging book will be an invaluable resource for instructorswishing to bring the benefits of writing-to-learn to thequantitative disciplines. As a mathematician thoroughly grounded inwriting-across-the-curriculum scholarship, Bahls brings humor,classroom experience, and pedagogical savvy to a mission he clearlyloves—improving the quality of student learning in math andscience."—John C. Bean, professor, Seattle University, andauthor, Engaging Ideas
User guide and training manual written for PM professionals who wish to learn how to set up a database and plan and control projects using Primavera P6 with or without Resources and Roles. The book is aimed at project management companies who wish to run their own training courses and training organisations requiring a training manual.

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