A self study textbook about mathematical methods suitable for engineers, physicists, and scientists desiring an introduction to concepts associated with linear partial differential equations. Includes numerous worked examples, and applications.
The subject of partial differential equations holds an exciting and special position in mathematics. Partial differential equations were not consciously created as a subject but emerged in the 18th century as ordinary differential equations failed to describe the physical principles being studied. The subject was originally developed by the major names of mathematics, in particular, Leonard Euler and Joseph-Louis Lagrange who studied waves on strings; Daniel Bernoulli and Euler who considered potential theory, with later developments by Adrien-Marie Legendre and Pierre-Simon Laplace; and Joseph Fourier's famous work on series expansions for the heat equation. Many of the greatest advances in modern science have been based on discovering the underlying partial differential equation for the process in question. James Clerk Maxwell, for example, put electricity and magnetism into a unified theory by establishing Maxwell's equations for electromagnetic theory, which gave solutions for prob lems in radio wave propagation, the diffraction of light and X-ray developments. Schrodinger's equation for quantum mechanical processes at the atomic level leads to experimentally verifiable results which have changed the face of atomic physics and chemistry in the 20th century. In fluid mechanics, the Navier Stokes' equations form a basis for huge number-crunching activities associated with such widely disparate topics as weather forecasting and the design of supersonic aircraft. Inevitably the study of partial differential equations is a large undertaking, and falls into several areas of mathematics.
This self-tutorial offers a concise yet thorough introduction into the mathematical analysis of approximation methods for partial differential equation. A particular emphasis is put on finite element methods. The unique approach first summarizes and outlines the finite-element mathematics in general and then in the second and major part, formulates problem examples that clearly demonstrate the techniques of functional analysis via numerous and diverse exercises. The solutions of the problems are given directly afterwards. Using this approach, the author motivates and encourages the reader to actively acquire the knowledge of finite- element methods instead of passively absorbing the material as in most standard textbooks. This English edition is based on the Finite Element Methods for Engineering Sciences by Joel Chaskalovic.
Introductory textbook from which students can approach more advance topics relating to finite difference methods.
A comprehensive guide to numerical methods for simulating physical-chemical systems This book offers a systematic, highly accessible presentation of numerical methods used to simulate the behavior of physical-chemical systems. Unlike most books on the subject, it focuses on methodology rather than specific applications. Written for students and professionals across an array of scientific and engineering disciplines and with varying levels of experience with applied mathematics, it provides comprehensive descriptions of numerical methods without requiring an advanced mathematical background. Based on its author’s more than forty years of experience teaching numerical methods to engineering students, Numerical Methods for Solving Partial Differential Equations presents the fundamentals of all of the commonly used numerical methods for solving differential equations at a level appropriate for advanced undergraduates and first-year graduate students in science and engineering. Throughout, elementary examples show how numerical methods are used to solve generic versions of equations that arise in many scientific and engineering disciplines. In writing it, the author took pains to ensure that no assumptions were made about the background discipline of the reader. Covers the spectrum of numerical methods that are used to simulate the behavior of physical-chemical systems that occur in science and engineering Written by a professor of engineering with more than forty years of experience teaching numerical methods to engineers Requires only elementary knowledge of differential equations and matrix algebra to master the material Designed to teach students to understand, appreciate and apply the basic mathematics and equations on which Mathcad and similar commercial software packages are based Comprehensive yet accessible to readers with limited mathematical knowledge, Numerical Methods for Solving Partial Differential Equations is an excellent text for advanced undergraduates and first-year graduate students in the sciences and engineering. It is also a valuable working reference for professionals in engineering, physics, chemistry, computer science, and applied mathematics.
The subject of partial differential equations holds an exciting place in mathematics. Inevitably, the subject falls into several areas of mathematics. At one extreme the interest lies in the existence and uniqueness of solutions, and the functional analysis of the proofs of these properties. At the other extreme lies the applied mathematical and engineering quest to find useful solutions, either analytically or numerically, to these important equations which can be used in design and construction. The book presents a clear introduction of the methods and underlying theory used in the numerical solution of partial differential equations. After revising the mathematical preliminaries, the book covers the finite difference method of parabolic or heat equations, hyperbolic or wave equations and elliptic or Laplace equations. Throughout, the emphasis is on the practical solution rather than the theoretical background, without sacrificing rigour.
This is the practical introduction to the analytical approach taken in Volume 2. Based upon courses in partial differential equations over the last two decades, the text covers the classic canonical equations, with the method of separation of variables introduced at an early stage. The characteristic method for first order equations acts as an introduction to the classification of second order quasi-linear problems by characteristics. Attention then moves to different co-ordinate systems, primarily those with cylindrical or spherical symmetry. Hence a discussion of special functions arises quite naturally, and in each case the major properties are derived. The next section deals with the use of integral transforms and extensive methods for inverting them, and concludes with links to the use of Fourier series.
Solution Techniques for Elementary Partial Differential Equations, Third Edition remains a top choice for a standard, undergraduate-level course on partial differential equations (PDEs). Making the text even more user-friendly, this third edition covers important and widely used methods for solving PDEs. New to the Third Edition New sections on the series expansion of more general functions, other problems of general second-order linear equations, vibrating string with other types of boundary conditions, and equilibrium temperature in an infinite strip Reorganized sections that make it easier for students and professors to navigate the contents Rearranged exercises that are now at the end of each section/subsection instead of at the end of the chapter New and improved exercises and worked examples A brief Mathematica® program for nearly all of the worked examples, showing students how to verify results by computer This bestselling, highly praised textbook uses a streamlined, direct approach to develop students’ competence in solving PDEs. It offers concise, easily understood explanations and worked examples that allow students to see the techniques in action.
This book is a text on partial differential equations (PDEs) of mathematical physics and boundary value problems, trigonometric Fourier series, and special functions. This is the core content of many courses in the fields of engineering, physics, mathematics, and applied mathematics. The accompanying software provides a laboratory environment that allows the user to generate and model different physical situations and learn by experimentation. From this standpoint, the book along with the software can also be used as a reference book on PDEs, Fourier series and special functions for students and professionals alike.
Differential equations, especially nonlinear, present the most effective way for describing complex physical processes. Methods for constructing exact solutions of differential equations play an important role in applied mathematics and mechanics. This book aims to provide scientists, engineers and students with an easy-to-follow, but comprehensive, description of the methods for constructing exact solutions of differential equations.
This text provides an application oriented introduction to the numerical methods for partial differential equations. It covers finite difference, finite element, and finite volume methods, interweaving theory and applications throughout. The book examines modern topics such as adaptive methods, multilevel methods, and methods for convection-dominated problems and includes detailed illustrations and extensive exercises.
Pedagogical insights gained through 30 years of teaching applied mathematics led the author to write this set of student oriented books. Topics such as complex analysis, matrix theory, vector and tensor analysis, Fourier analysis, integral transforms, ordinary and partial differential equations are presented in a discursive style that is readable and easy to follow. Numerous examples, completely worked out, together with carefully selected problem sets with answers are used to enhance students' understanding and manipulative skill. The goal is to make students comfortable in using advanced mathematical tools in junior, senior, and beginning graduate courses.
A practical handbook for understanding and using fast adaptive composite grid (FAC) methods for discretization and solution of partial differential equations (PDEs). Contains fundamental concepts. These so-called FAC are characterized by their use of a composite grid, which is nominally the union of various uniform grids. FAC is capable of producing a composite grid with tailored resolution, and a corresponding solution with commensurate accuracy, at a cost proportional to the number of composite grid points. Moreover, special asynchronous versions of the fast adaptive composite grid methods (AFAC) studied here have seemingly optimal complexity in a parallel computing environment. Most of the methods treated in this book were discovered only within the last decade, and in many cases their development is still in its infancy. While this is not meant to be comprehensive, it does provide a theoretical and practical guide to multilevel adaptive methods and relevant discretization techniques.
Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations: Finite Difference and Finite Volume Methods focuses on two popular deterministic methods for solving partial differential equations (PDEs), namely finite difference and finite volume methods. The solution of PDEs can be very challenging, depending on the type of equation, the number of independent variables, the boundary, and initial conditions, and other factors. These two methods have been traditionally used to solve problems involving fluid flow. For practical reasons, the finite element method, used more often for solving problems in solid mechanics, and covered extensively in various other texts, has been excluded. The book is intended for beginning graduate students and early career professionals, although advanced undergraduate students may find it equally useful. The material is meant to serve as a prerequisite for students who might go on to take additional courses in computational mechanics, computational fluid dynamics, or computational electromagnetics. The notations, language, and technical jargon used in the book can be easily understood by scientists and engineers who may not have had graduate-level applied mathematics or computer science courses. Presents one of the few available resources that comprehensively describes and demonstrates the finite volume method for unstructured mesh used frequently by practicing code developers in industry Includes step-by-step algorithms and code snippets in each chapter that enables the reader to make the transition from equations on the page to working codes Includes 51 worked out examples that comprehensively demonstrate important mathematical steps, algorithms, and coding practices required to numerically solve PDEs, as well as how to interpret the results from both physical and mathematic perspectives
This book provides a basic introduction to reduced basis (RB) methods for problems involving the repeated solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) arising from engineering and applied sciences, such as PDEs depending on several parameters and PDE-constrained optimization. The book presents a general mathematical formulation of RB methods, analyzes their fundamental theoretical properties, discusses the related algorithmic and implementation aspects, and highlights their built-in algebraic and geometric structures. More specifically, the authors discuss alternative strategies for constructing accurate RB spaces using greedy algorithms and proper orthogonal decomposition techniques, investigate their approximation properties and analyze offline-online decomposition strategies aimed at the reduction of computational complexity. Furthermore, they carry out both a priori and a posteriori error analysis. The whole mathematical presentation is made more stimulating by the use of representative examples of applicative interest in the context of both linear and nonlinear PDEs. Moreover, the inclusion of many pseudocodes allows the reader to easily implement the algorithms illustrated throughout the text. The book will be ideal for upper undergraduate students and, more generally, people interested in scientific computing. All these pseudocodes are in fact implemented in a MATLAB package that is freely available at https://github.com/redbkit
Combining both classical and current methods of analysis, this text present discussions on the application of functional analytic methods in partial differential equations. It furnishes a simplified, self-contained proof of Agmon-Douglis-Niremberg's Lp-estimates for boundary value problems, using the theory of singular integrals and the Hilbert transform.
The main theme is the integration of the theory of linear PDE and the theory of finite difference and finite element methods. For each type of PDE, elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic, the text contains one chapter on the mathematical theory of the differential equation, followed by one chapter on finite difference methods and one on finite element methods. The chapters on elliptic equations are preceded by a chapter on the two-point boundary value problem for ordinary differential equations. Similarly, the chapters on time-dependent problems are preceded by a chapter on the initial-value problem for ordinary differential equations. There is also one chapter on the elliptic eigenvalue problem and eigenfunction expansion. The presentation does not presume a deep knowledge of mathematical and functional analysis. The required background on linear functional analysis and Sobolev spaces is reviewed in an appendix. The book is suitable for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students of applied mathematics and engineering.
List of participants; Elliptic equations; Parabolic equations; Hyperbolic equations.
Operator splitting (or the fractional steps method) is a very common tool to analyze nonlinear partial differential equations both numerically and analytically. By applying operator splitting to a complicated model one can often split it into simpler problems that can be analyzed separately. In this book one studies operator splitting for a family of nonlinear evolution equations, including hyperbolic conservation laws and degenerate convection-diffusion equations. Common for these equations is the prevalence of rough, or non-smooth, solutions, e.g., shocks. Rigorous analysis is presented, showing that both semi-discrete and fully discrete splitting methods converge. For conservation laws, sharp error estimates are provided and for convection-diffusion equations one discusses a priori and a posteriori correction of entropy errors introduced by the splitting. Numerical methods include finite difference and finite volume methods as well as front tacking. The theory is illustrated by numerous examples. There is a dedicated web page that provides MATLAB codes for many of the examples. The book is suitable for graduate students and researchers in pure and applied mathematics, physics, and engineering.
Suitable for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students taking a course on mathematical physics, this title presents some of the most important topics and methods of mathematical physics. It contains mathematical derivations and solutions - reinforcing the material through repetition of both the equations and the techniques.

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