Short introduction to the amazing finds of garments from the Norse settlement of Herjolfnes in Greenland by Else Østergård. Chapters on technique: production of the tread, dyeing, weaving techniques, cutting and sewing by Anna Nørgaard. Measurements and drawing of garments, hoods, and stockings with sewing instructions by Lilli Frandsen. A practical guide to making your own Norse Medieval garment!
This volume begins with a short introduction by Else Ostergard to the amazing finds of garments from the Norse settlement of Herjolfnes in Greenland. It then features chapters on technique - production of the thread, dyeing, weaving techniques, cutting and sewing - by Anna Norgard. Also included are measurements and drawings of garments, hoods, and stockings, with sewing instructions, by Lilli Fransen. A practical guide to making your own Norse garment!
This volume begins with a short introduction by Else Ostergard to the amazing finds of garments from the Norse settlement of Herjolfnes in Greenland. It then features chapters on technique - production of the thread, dyeing, weaving techniques, cutting and sewing - by Anna Norgard. Also included are measurements and drawings of garments, hoods, and stockings, with sewing instructions, by Lilli Fransen. A practical guide to making your own Norse garment!
Scraps of clothing and other textiles are among the most evocative items to be discovered by archaeologists, signalling as they do their owner's status and concerns.
Describing the different garments worn by women and men, this book looks at the aspects of cloth production - raw materials, production tools and techniques for woven and non-woven textiles, decorative textiles and embroidery. It also shows how much can be reconstructed from the discoveries of archaeological excavation.
"One of the most celebrated painters of the eighteenth century, Jan van Huysum (Dutch, 1682-1749) gained immense fame and fortune for his meticulously rendered bouquets of flowers and fruit. With their precise botanical depictions, brilliant colors, and technical virtuosity, Van Huysums's elegant compositions were avidly collected by the elite connoisseurs throughout Europe."-- Publisher description.
This encyclopaedic study of English Anglo-Saxon dress examines the subject from the fifth and sixth centuries up to the eleventh century, drawing evidence from archaeology, text and art (with reference to re-enactors' experiences). It is based on the author's original study published two decades ago, during which time much has been learnt about the subject. Archaeological textiles, cloth production and the significance of imported cloth and foreign fashions are all put under scrutiny. Dress is discussed as a marker of gender, ethnicity, status and social role, and its contemporary significance in terms of symbolism and stylistic messaging is examined — whether Anglo-Saxons were dressing a corpse for its (pagan) grave, condemning frivolous dress among persons in holy orders, bequeathing their own clothes, or commissioning clothes for a king. The book discusses what modern observers can and cannot deduce from medieval representations of clothing, questioning stereotypes. The numerous illustrations, including specially commissioned colour plates, photographs and drawings, demonstrate clothing in contemporary art (manuscripts, ivories, metalwork, stone sculpture, mosaics), and focus on surviving dress fasteners and accessories, explaining types and geographical—chronological distribution. The colour reconstructions of early Anglo-Saxon dress are complemented by a cutting pattern for a gown from the Bayeux Tapestry (by Robin Netherton). Old English garment names are discussed throughout and a glossary is appended.
A comprehensive guide to making period clothes for re-enactment, living history or theatre. From establishing the date of your outfit, defining the wearer and selecting garments, to measurements, patterns, materials, and methods of construction, you can discover how to make braies, shirts and smocks, cotes, kirtles, doublets, hose, surcotes, cotehardies, gowns, overkirtles, cloaks, children's clothing, a variety of head-wear and accessories.There are over 400 line illustrations, including 121 patterns, as well as historical illustrations and photographs. A comprehensive guide for anyone wishing to reproduce historical dress, for re-enactment, living history displays, drama or personal use. The garments are presented with brief notes on their historical background in three main layers, underwear, main garments and outer garments for men, women and children.There is a section on 'How to use the book' with detailed instructions on techniques, planning and materials. Superbly illustrated with over 400 line illustrations and 121 patterns. Sarah Thursfield is an experienced cutter and dressmaker with a special interest in medieval dress.
If you don't already know Nille Glæsel, you might yet know her clothes. Through years creating reconstructions for museums and re-enactment, she has made outfits for many of today's best-dressed Vikings. Her clothes are always distinguished by their elegant design and excellent workmanship.But this book is more than just a wonderful showcase for Nille's beautiful clothes. Through simple, easy-to-follow instructions, Nille shows how you can create these garments for yourself. In doing so, she puts her experience as a seamstress at your fingertips. Her careful instructions show the same attention to detail that makes her own work look like real clothes rather than mere theatrical mock-ups.
The analysis of silk is a fascinating topic for research in itself but here, focusing on the 9th and 10th centuries, Marianne Vedeler takes a closer look at the trade routes and the organization of production, trade and consumption of silk during the Viking Age. Beginning with a presentation of the silk finds in the Oseberg burial, the richest Viking burial find ever discovered, the other silk finds from high status graves in Scandinavia are discussed along with an introduction to the techniques used to produce raw silk and fabrics. Later chapters concentrate on trade and exchange, considering the role of silk items both as trade objects and precious gifts, and in the light of coin finds. The main trade routes of silk to Scandinavia along the Russian rivers, and comparable Russian finds are described and the production and regulation of silk in Persia, early Islamic production areas and the Byzantine Empire discussed. The final chapter considers silk as a social actor in various contexts in Viking societies compared to the Christian west.
The Medieval Tailor's Assistant is the standard work for both amateurs and professionals wishing to re-create the clothing of the Medieval era for historical interpretation or drama. This new edition extends its range with details of fitting different figures and many more patterns for main garments and accessories from 1100 to 1480. It includes simple instructions for plain garments, as well as more complex patterns and adaptations for experienced sewers. Advice on planning outfits and materials to use is given along with a range of projects and alternative designs, from undergarments to outer wear. Early and later tailoring methods are also covered within the period. There are clear line drawings, pattern diagrams and layouts and over eighty full-colour photographs that show the garments as working outfits. The garments are presented with brief notes on their historical background in three mainlayers, underwear, main garments and outer garments for men, women and children. There is a section on 'How to use the book' with detailed instructions on techniques, planning, materials and, in particular, cutting methods from 1100. In this new edition there are over 400 line illustrations and a further 80 colour photographs as well as patterns for 151 garments and accessories.
This richly illustrated book presents a selection of the rich and varied iconographic material from the Scandinavian Late Iron Age (AD 400-1050) depicting clothed human figures, from an archaeological textile and clothing perspective. The source material consists of five object categories: gold foils, gold bracteates, helmet plaques, jewelry, and textile tapestries and comprises over 1000 different images of male and female costumes which are then systematically examined in conjunction with our present knowledge of archaeological textiles. In particular, the study explores the question of whether the selected images complement the archaeological clothing sources, through a new analytical tool which enables us to compare and contrast the object categories in regard to material, function, chronology, context and interpretation. The tool is used to record and analyze the numerous details of the iconographic costumes, and to facilitate a clear and easy description. This deliberate use of explicit costume shapes enhances our interpretation and understanding of the Late Iron Age clothing tradition. Thus, the majority of the costumes depicted are identified in the Scandinavian archaeological textile record, demonstrating that the depictions are a reliable source of research for both iconographical costume and archaeological clothing. The book contributes with new information on social, regional and chronological differences in clothing traditions from ca. AD 400 to the Viking Age.
This book contains three 16th century Austrian tailors' guild masterbook manuscripts, or schnittbuch, Nidermayr (1560), Enns and Leonfeldner (1590). These manuscripts were created to help journeyman tailors study and pass the master tailor exam. The original manuscripts have been transcribed and translated into English.
With nothing more than colored yarn and simple cardboard squares, crafters can produce exquisitely patterned woven bands with this guide, which includes patterns for sturdy belts and camera straps, delicate silk trims and ties, creative wall art, and even hefty rugs and mats.
Detailed illustrations and photographs of over 300 exquisite lace samples and designs created over past 500 years. Delicate masterpieces depict human and mythical figures, filigree designs of hearts and flowers, beautiful floral and foliate motifs, and more. Royalty-free designs from elegant borders, edgings, collars, doilies, much else.
Danish Medival Castles is the first comprehensive overview in English of the castles and fortifications, known from medieval Denmark. The book tells the story of who built the castles, when they did it, and why it happened. Over the past decades, several locations have been examined, a few new sites have been found, and old excavations have been reopened, all of this resulting in new knowledge. The book also tells the story about everyday life in the Medieval Danish castles, and about the importance of the castles in the turbulent Danish Medieval history.
Twenty per cent of the UK population - 12 million people - suffer IBS-related symptoms, but they may be unaware that the simple elimination of starch from their diet can bring dramatic relief from pain and discomfort. In this revised edition, Carol Sinclair, a sufferer who has successfully overcome IBS and arthritic pain, brings you a revolutionary programme for a pain-free future. This practical guide will help millions to reduce their arthritic symptoms, whose pain to date has been relieved only by regular medication, with sometimes dangerous side effects. The diet shows that a gradual reduction of starch in one's diet can dramatically reduce pain in days, to a point where drug usage is reduced and, in some cases, eliminated completely. Details of the discovery - along with case histories and a practical guide - make Carol Sinclair's book a first in the world. The IBS Low-Starch Diet also contains over 200 delicious starch- and gluten-free recipes, along with a comprehensive guide to eating out.
Concentrating on the Caribbean Basin and the coastal area of northeast South America, Yvonne Daniel considers three African-derived religious systems that rely heavily on dance behavior--Haitian Vodou, Cuban Yoruba, and Bahamian Candomble. Combining her background in dance and anthropology to parallel the participant/scholar dichotomy inherent to dancing's embodied knowledge, Daniel examines these misunderstood and oppressed performative dances in terms of physiology, psychology, philosophy, mathematics, ethics, and aesthetics.

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