The new edition of this popular textbook, once again, provides an indispensable guide for the next generation of mineralogists. Designed for use on one- or two-semester courses, this second edition has been thoughtfully reorganised, making it more accessible to students, whilst still being suitable for an advanced mineralogy course. Additions include expanded introductions to many chapters, a new introductory chapter on crystal chemistry, revised figures, and an extended plates section containing beautiful colour photographs. Text boxes include historical background and case studies to engage students, and end-of-chapter questions help them reinforce concepts. With new online resources to support learning and teaching, including laboratory exercises, PowerPoint slides, useful web links and mineral identification tables, this is a sound investment for students in the fields of geology, materials science and environmental science, and a valuable reference for researchers, collectors and anyone interested in minerals.
Minerals: Their Constitution and Origin is an introduction to mineralogy for undergraduate and graduate students in the fields of geology and materials science. It has been designed for a one-semester course and covers all aspects of mineralogy in an up-to-date and integrated style. The book is divided into five parts that discuss structure and bonding within minerals; mineral physics and optical properties; modes of mineral formation and thermodynamics; mineral groups within the context of mineral-forming environments; and the application of mineralogy for the exploitation of metal deposits, gems, and cement. Identification of minerals in hand specimen and under the microscope are also covered. Throughout the text emphasis is placed on linking mineral properties with broader geological processes, and on conveying their economic value. Containing beautiful colour photographs, handy reference tables and a glossary of terms, this textbook will be an indispensable guide for the next generation of mineralogy students.
Minerals: Their Constitution and Origin is an introduction to mineralogy for undergraduate and graduate students in the fields of geology and materials science. It has been designed for a one-semester course and covers all aspects of mineralogy in an up-to-date and integrated style. The book is divided into five parts that discuss structure and bonding within minerals; mineral physics and optical properties; modes of mineral formation and thermodynamics; mineral groups within the context of mineral-forming environments; and the application of mineralogy for the exploitation of metal deposits, gems, and cement. Identification of minerals in hand specimen and under the microscope are also covered. Throughout the text emphasis is placed on linking mineral properties with broader geological processes, and on conveying their economic value. Containing beautiful colour photographs, handy reference tables and a glossary of terms, this textbook will be an indispensable guide for the next generation of mineralogy students.
How do crystals nucleate and grow? Why and how do crystals form such a wide variety of morphologies, from polyhedral to dendritic and spherulitic forms? These are questions that have been posed since the seventeenth century, and are still of vital importance today both for modern technology, and to understand the Earth's interior and the formation of minerals by living organisms. In this book, Ichiro Sunagawa sets out clearly the atomic processes behind crystal growth, and describes case studies of complex systems from diamond, calcite and pyrite, to crystals formed through biomineralization, such as the aragonite of shells, and apatite of teeth. Essential reading for advanced graduates and researchers in mineralogy and materials science.
Origin and Mineralogy of Clays, the first of two volumes, lays the groundwork for a thorough study of clays in the environment. The second volume will deal with environmental interaction. Going from soils to sediments to diagenesis and hydrothermal alteration, the book covers the whole spectrum of clays. The chapters on surface environments are of great relevance in regard to environmental problems in soils, rivers and lake-ocean situations, showing the greatest interaction between living species and the chemicals in their habitat. The book is of interest to scientists and students working on environmental issues.
A colorful and informative introduction to some of the most common rocks and minerals, packed with amazing facts, fun puzzles and games, and more than 100 reusable stickers Ideal for younger readers, this beautiful sticker book showcases stones from the tiger’s eye and leopard skin stone to rubies, sapphires, diamonds, emeralds, and many more. The stickers are accompanied by fun learning pages with information on how rocks and minerals form, what they are made into, and how to identify them, as well as lots of bite-size facts about their size, color, and origin. Readers can put their knowledge to the test with some puzzles and games, including a coloring activity and rocky maze, and create their own scenes by adding stickers to a colorful double page landscape spread. The book is fully checked and approved by the department of zoology at the Natural History Museum, London. The museum’s world-class collections of minerals, ores, meteorites, rocks, and soils include specimens from Mars and the moon, and from the earliest bodies that helped to form the solar system 4.56 billion years ago.
As the amount of information in biology expands dramatically, it becomes increasingly important for textbooks to distill the vast amount of scientific knowledge into concise principles and enduring concepts.As with previous editions, Molecular Biology of the Cell, Sixth Edition accomplishes this goal with clear writing and beautiful illustrations. The Sixth Edition has been extensively revised and updated with the latest research in the field of cell biology, and it provides an exceptional framework for teaching and learning. The entire illustration program has been greatly enhanced.Protein structures better illustrate structure–function relationships, icons are simpler and more consistent within and between chapters, and micrographs have been refreshed and updated with newer, clearer, or better images. As a new feature, each chapter now contains intriguing openended questions highlighting “What We Don’t Know,” introducing students to challenging areas of future research. Updated end-of-chapter problems reflect new research discussed in the text, and these problems have been expanded to all chapters by adding questions on developmental biology, tissues and stem cells, pathogens, and the immune system.
An award-winning professor of economics at MIT and a Harvard University political scientist and economist evaluate the reasons that some nations are poor while others succeed, outlining provocative perspectives that support theories about the importance of institutions. Reprint.
Questions about the origin and nature of Earth and the life on it have long preoccupied human thought and the scientific endeavor. Deciphering the planet's history and processes could improve the ability to predict catastrophes like earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, to manage Earth's resources, and to anticipate changes in climate and geologic processes. At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Science Foundation, and U.S. Geological Survey, the National Research Council assembled a committee to propose and explore grand questions in geological and planetary science. This book captures, in a series of questions, the essential scientific challenges that constitute the frontier of Earth science at the start of the 21st century.
Beginning with an obscure discovery in 1896, radioactivity led researchers on a quest for understanding that ultimately confronted the intersection of knowledge and mystery. This book tells the story of a new science that profoundly changed physics and chemistry, as well as areas such as medicine, geology, meteorology, archaeology, industry, politics, and popular culture.
At publication date, a free ebook version of this title will be available through Luminos, University of California Press's Open Access publishing program. Visit www.luminosoa.org to learn more. Virtuous Waters is the first study of mineral waters and bathing in Mexico. It traces the evolving ideas about these waters, from European contact to the present, in order to shed new light on human-environment relations in the modern world. Our relation to water is among the most urgent of global issues, as increasing scarcity and pollution threaten food shortages, deteriorating public health, and the collapse of aquatic ecosystems. Drawing on ideas from political ecology, the author brings together an analysis of the shifts in the concept of water and a material history of environments, infrastructures, and bathing. The book analyzes a range of issues concerning complex "water cultures" that have formed around Mexican groundwaters over time and suggests that this understanding might also help us comprehend and confront the water crisis that is coming to a head in the twenty-first century.
New York Times Bestseller A Summer Reading Pick for President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.” One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us? Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book that begins about 70,000 years ago with the appearance of modern cognition. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, Sapiens integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas. Dr. Harari also compels us to look ahead, because over the last few decades humans have begun to bend laws of natural selection that have governed life for the past four billion years. We are acquiring the ability to design not only the world around us, but also ourselves. Where is this leading us, and what do we want to become? Featuring 27 photographs, 6 maps, and 25 illustrations/diagrams, this provocative and insightful work is sure to spark debate and is essential reading for aficionados of Jared Diamond, James Gleick, Matt Ridley, Robert Wright, and Sharon Moalem.
WHAT ARE THESE GRACEFUL VISITORS TO OUR SKIES? WE NOW KNOW THAT THEY BRING BOTH LIFE AND DEATH AND TEACH US ABOUT OUR ORIGINS. Comet begins with a breathtaking journey through space astride a comet. Pulitzer Prize-winning astronomer Carl Sagan, author of Cosmos and Contact, and writer Ann Druyan explore the origin, nature, and future of comets, and the exotic myths and portents attached to them. The authors show how comets have spurred some of the great discoveries in the history of science and raise intriguing questions about these brilliant visitors from the interstellar dark. Were the fates of the dinosaurs and the origins of humans tied to the wanderings of a comet? Are comets the building blocks from which worlds are formed? Lavishly illustrated with photographs and specially commissioned full-color paintings, Comet is an enthralling adventure, indispensable for anyone who has ever gazed up at the heavens and wondered why. "SIMPLY THE BEST." *The Times of London "FASCINATING, EVOCATIVE, INSPIRING." *The Washington Post "COMET HUMANIZES SCIENCE. A BEAUTIFUL, INTERESTING BOOK." *United Press International "MASTERFUL . . . SCIENCE, POETRY, AND IMAGINATION." *The Atlanta Journal & Constitution
Studies the Environmental, Cosmetic, and Pharmaceutical Applications of Bentonite Clay Bentonite clay, of which members of the smectite family of clay minerals are particularly important, has proven to be effective in sealing off wastes from groundwater. Bentonite Clay: Environmental Properties and Applications explores the mineralogy of clays in general and of smectites in particular that represent challenging conditions for geotechnical professionals responsible for earth dam construction, the foundations of roads and buildings, and the long-term isolation of chemical and radioactive wastes. The author, a world-renowned expert on the subject, places special emphasis on the environmental behavior of bentonite clay when focused on the isolation of hazardous wastes and also considers its use in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. Based on classical literature and current research and development, this text provides an in-depth introduction to bentonite soil, explains the origin of smectite-rich clays, and pinpoints where they can be found. The book describes the interaction of expandable clay minerals, gas, and fluids, followed by a description of the physical and chemical properties of smectite clay saturated with water or chemical solutions. It also provides relevant findings and conclusions concerning the function of bentonite-based sealing repositories for dangerous waste. This text: Describes the constitution of smectite minerals as a basis for understanding the behavior of smectite clays and their performance in the isolation of hazardous waste Factors in the longevity of smectite clays in bentonite beds and in the form of canister-embedding buffers in repositories for deep geological disposal of highly radioactive waste (HLW) Covers the design principles for clay seals and considers their function in the isolation of waste and redirecting groundwater flow Bentonite Clay: Environmental Properties and Applications documents the origin, properties, and characteristics of bentonite and its uses. A resource for researchers, practitioners, regulators, and policy makers, the text examines the use of clay in hazardous waste and nuclear waste management and provides readers with detailed descriptions of related technical solutions.
The forensic potential of geological and soil evidence has been recognized for more than a century, but recently these types of evidence are used much more widely as an investigative intelligence tool and as evidence in court. There is, however, still a poor understanding of the potential value and the limitations of geological and soil evidence among the forensic science and wider legal communities. Geological and Soil Evidence: Forensic Applications provides an authoritative introduction to the nature and properties of geological and soil materials that may be used as trace evidence and the techniques used to analyze and evaluate them. It emphasizes the use of geoscience in forensic analyses, including geophysical, meteorological, and geomorphological data. This inclusive book covers material types and analytical strategies used in examining both the common components of geological evidence, such as rocks, dusts, minerals, spores, and microfossils, as well as anthropogenic particles like pottery and brick. It instructs on particle characterization based on physical, chemical, and mineralogical traits such as color, shape, density, and elemental and isotopic composition. It also explains sampling and handling procedures particular to criminalistics and introduces analysis, evaluation, and decision-making practices based on statistical significance and the weighing of different types of evidence. Discussions of basic principles are supported and enhanced with numerous case studies that tie methods of analysis to specific forensic applications. Examples are drawn from the author's own experience as well as the wider scientific literature. Accessible enough for readers with limited scientific knowledge and informative enough for scientists interested in forensic applications, Geological and Soil Evidence: Forensic Applications is a comprehensive reference for the current knowledge of forensic geology and soil science.
This book provides information about springs, mineral waters, and thermal waters used for municipal, industrial, and agricultural water supplies and the rapidly expanding bottled water industry. The role of springs is described for ancient civilizations, military campaigns and, in more recent times, for tourism and health spas. In addition, their source, occurrence, and methods for development and use are described. The book contains data obtained from major hydrogeologic databases and from leading hydrogeologists.
Crystallization of Magma is one of a series of single-topic problem modules intended for use in undergraduate geology and earth science courses. Through problems and observations based on two sets of experiments, this module leads to an understanding of how an igneous rock can form from molten material. Environmental factors responsible for important variations observed in magnetic rocks are stressed. Two fundamental factors affecting or controlling the mineral composition and texture of the resulting rock (initial magma composition and cooling rate) are also stressed. In addition, reasons why scientists classify materials in general and how they classify rocks in particular are explored. However, the ability to name or identify rocks is not a necessary result of attaining the module's goals. Supplemental questions included at the end of the module may prove difficult for the average non-major; they are intended to challenge the superior student. Like other modules in the series, this module is inquiry- and problem-oriented, dealing with interdisciplinary, contemporary, and pragmatic aspects of the subject matter. It is designed to be open-ended so that ideas can be incorporated into higher level classwork. (Author/JN)
This book follows another by the same author, published in 1977, which the author considered as ``a first attempt to put some order in the house of clay petrology''. That book was described as ``an excellent first attack on clay mineral petrology... informative, and stimulating because of the method of presentation and the open-door treatment of the subject. Not only clay-mineral scientists but petrologists in general must read this first book on clay mineral petrology.'' (Earth Science Reviews). This book describes clay mineral occurrence in terms of the physical and chemical forces which influence it. It includes a geological description of mineral occurrence, a definition of the major features of clay mineral chemical composition, and an indication of the physical-chemical boundaries of these occurrences. It also presents general patterns for the geological environments of weathering, sedimentation, burial diagenesis, deep sea basalt alteration, hydrothermal alteration of acidic rocks and chemical precipitation in acidic and basic environments. The major clay groups are related to one another as they occur in geological systems through the use of graphical analysis. The author has thoroughly reviewed the relevant literature for the last 25 years. The data and analyses obtained and presented in this book will not only make interesting reading, but will also prove extremely useful to those involved with studies in deep sea research, mining geology, petroleum geology, agronomy and civil engineering.

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