Minimalism is the thing that gets us past the things so we can make room for life's most important things—which actually aren't things at all. At age 30, best friends Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus walked away from their six-figure corporate careers, jettisoned most of their material possessions, and started focusing on what's truly important. In their debut book, Joshua & Ryan, authors of the popular website The Minimalists, explore their troubled pasts and descent into depression. Though they had achieved the American Dream, they worked ridiculous hours, wastefully spent money, and lived paycheck to paycheck. Instead of discovering their passions, they pacified themselves with ephemeral indulgences—which only led to more debt, depression, and discontent. After a pair of life-changing events, Joshua & Ryan discovered minimalism, allowing them to eliminate their excess material things so they could focus on life's most important "things": health, relationships, passion, growth, and contribution.
What if everything you ever wanted isn’t what you actually want? Twenty-something, suit-clad, and upwardly mobile, Joshua Fields Millburn thought he had everything anyone could ever want. Until he didn’t anymore. Blindsided by the loss of his mother and his marriage in the same month, Millburn started questioning every aspect of the life he had built for himself. Then, he accidentally discovered a lifestyle known as minimalism…and everything started to change. That was four years ago. Since, Millburn, now 32, has embraced simplicity. In the pursuit of looking for something more substantial than compulsory consumption and the broken American Dream, he jettisoned most of his material possessions, paid off loads of crippling debt, and walked away from his six-figure career. So, when everything was gone, what was left? Not a how-to book but a why-to book, Everything That Remains is the touching, surprising story of what happened when one young man decided to let go of everything and begin living more deliberately. Heartrending, uplifting, and deeply personal, this engrossing memoir is peppered with insightful (and often hilarious) interruptions by Ryan Nicodemus, Millburn’s best friend of twenty years.
The best of The Minimalists. This book by Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus collects the most relevant essays—some short, some long—from their popular website, TheMinimalists.com. This collection has been edited and organized to create an experience that's considerably different from reading individual selections online. From simple living, decluttering, and finances, to passion, health, and relationships, Essential is for anyone who desires a more intentional life.
At age 30, Joshua Fields Millburn left his six-figure career, ditched most of his material possessions, and started focusing on life's most important aspects. Once he embraced his newfound minimalist lifestyle, he never looked back. Suffice it to say, everything has changed in Millburn's life in the last three years. After his mother died in October 2009 and his marriage ended a month later, he began questioning everything in his life: his material possessions, his career, his goals, his health, his relationships, his path in life. Soon he discovered minimalism. In the three years since the author adopted a minimalist lifestyle, he has written more than 300 essays about minimalism and intentional living. He has written about his journey, his failures, his lessons, and everything he has learned during his transformation. A Day in the Life of a Minimalist is a collection of his best, most important individual writings--rethought and edited specifically for this collection. This 208-page book contains 50 essays about living a meaningful life with less stuff, including "The Short Guide to Getting Rid of Your Crap," "The Commodification of Love," "Letting Go of Shitty Relationships," and the title essay. Collectively, these essays are purposefully organized into nine sections--lifestyle, goals, experiments, clutter, relationships, changes, philosophy, consumer culture, and work--covering a variety of topics, viewpoints, and arguments within those themes. Also included are a special forward written by Colin Wright (the man who introduced Millburn to minimalism) and an introduction by Joshua Fields Millburn, as well as two unpublished essays that can't be found anywhere else: "What If Everyone Was a Minimalist?" and "Work-Life Balance." These essays were written to encourage readers to think critically about the excess in their lives and, ultimately, to take action towards living more intentionally. This collection is short enough to be read in a few sittings, or it can be digested slowly, reading one essay a day for nearly two months, applying its principals each day to your own life.
The best-selling phenomenon from Japan that shows us a minimalist life is a happy life. Fumio Sasaki is not an enlightened minimalism expert or organizing guru like Marie Kondo—he’s just a regular guy who was stressed out and constantly comparing himself to others, until one day he decided to change his life by saying goodbye to everything he didn’t absolutely need. The effects were remarkable: Sasaki gained true freedom, new focus, and a real sense of gratitude for everything around him. In Goodbye, Things Sasaki modestly shares his personal minimalist experience, offering specific tips on the minimizing process and revealing how the new minimalist movement can not only transform your space but truly enrich your life. The benefits of a minimalist life can be realized by anyone, and Sasaki’s humble vision of true happiness will open your eyes to minimalism’s potential.
Organizing your home and leading a minimalist lifestyle can seem like a daydream for busy families, but it's possible! Designed for families who want to declutter and embrace minimalism into their life and home, Minimalism for Families lays out a room-by-room strategy to conquer chaos and show your family how much more time, space, and energy you gain when you live with less.
Save your life from your stuff with minimalist living Declutter your home. Live simply. Save money. Learn mental tricks to want what you already have, instead of always craving more. Minimalism doesn't mean you live in a bare apartment and own three shirts. Minimalism means cutting out the things in your life that waste your time, energy and money, so you can spend time on the things you love and cherish most. It's true: Less is more. NEW 2nd Edition: Updated & Expanded. Now includes 30% more content and an interview with the author If you buy "Minimalist Living," you will: Declutter your home, declutter your closet and declutter your mind Want what you already have Quit the shopping addiction Live a more full and creative life with frugal living Learn how to practice simple living but also live a life of abundance Harness mindfulness and gratitude to live a happier life Discover how less is more with minimalism Don't waste another day buried under things. Live a life of beauty, engagement, simplicity, and abundance with minimalism. Buy "Minimalist Living" today to learn how to declutter your home, save time, digitally detox and live a life of true meaning.
Stress less while living more! An inviting living space. Time spent with loved ones. Peace of mind. With Do Less, a happier, more serene life is just moments away. From your home to your finances, this straightforward guide teaches you how to scale back your possessions and commitments to just what you really need. With hundreds of ways to minimalize your life, you'll quickly uncover the joys and rewards of paring down. A must-have for any shelf, Do Less helps you rediscover the simple moments that have been buried beneath the piles of to-dos, to-knows, and to-buys.
Stuffocation is a movement manifesto for “experiential” living, a call to arms to stop accumulating stuff and start accumulating experiences, and a road map for a new way forward with the potential to transform our lives. Reject materialism. Embrace experientialism. Live more with less. Stuffocation is one of the most pressing problems of the twenty-first century. We have more stuff than we could ever need, and it isn’t making us happier. It’s bad for the planet. It’s cluttering up our homes. It’s making us stressed—and it might even be killing us. A rising number of us are already turning our backs on all-you-can-get consumption. We are choosing access over ownership, and taking our business to companies like Zipcar, Spotify, and Netflix. Fed up with materialism, we are ready for a new way forward. Trend forecaster James Wallman traces our obsession with stuff back to the original Mad Men, who first created desire through advertising. He interviews anthropologists studying the clutter crisis, economists searching for new ways of measuring progress, and psychologists who link stuffocation to declining well-being. And he introduces us to the innovators who are already living more consciously and with more meaning by choosing experience over stuff. Experientialism does not mean giving up all of our possessions. It is a solution that is less extreme but equally fundamental. It’s about transforming what we value. Stuffocation is a paradigm-shifting look at our habits and an inspiring call for living more with less. It’s the one important book you won’t be able to live without. Praise for Stuffocation “The revelations come fast and furious as he asserts that acquiring ‘stuff’ is often just an easy way to ignore the tougher questions of life, dodging ‘why am I here?’ and ‘how should I live?’ for ‘will that go with the top I bought last week?’ Tart and often funny . . . [Stuffocation] will be an eye-opener for those long ago persuaded that more is better. A scintillating read that will provoke conversation (or at least closet cleaning).”—Booklist “James Wallman deftly hits upon a major insight for our times: that acquiring ‘stuff’ and ‘things’ is not nearly as meaningful as collecting experiences. Some of the happiest days of my life were when I had nothing and lived on a houseboat. Without stuff to tie me down, I felt completely free.”—Blake Mycoskie, founder of TOMS and author of the New York Times bestseller Start Something That Matters “A must-read . . . We think that more stuff will make us happier, but as the book nicely shows, we’re just plain wrong. A great mix of stories and science, Stuffocation reveals the downside of more, and what we can do about it.”—Jonah Berger, author of the New York Times bestseller Contagious “Wallman offers a deeply important message by weaving contemporary social science into very engaging stories. Reading the book is such a pleasure that you hardly recognize you’re being told that you should change how you live your life.”—Barry Schwartz, author of The Paradox of Choice “With a sociologist’s eye and a storyteller’s ear, Wallman takes us on a tour of today’s experience economy from the perspective not of businesses, nor even of consumers per se, but of everyday people.”—B. Joseph Pine II and James H. Gilmore, authors of The Experience Economy From the Hardcover edition.
This carefully crafted ebook: "The Devil's Dictionary (or The Cynic's Wordbook: Unabridged with all the Definitions)" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. The book is a classic satire in the form of a dictionary on which Bierce worked for decades. It was originally published in 1906 as The Cynic's Word Book before being retitled in 1911. A number of the definitions are accompanied by satiric verses, many of which are signed with comic pseudonyms. It offers reinterpretations of terms in the English language which lampoon cant and political double-talk as well as other aspects of human foolishness and frailty. The definitions provide satirical, witty and often politically pointed representations of the words that is seeks to "define". The Devil's Dictionary has inspired many imitations both in its day and more recently. Ambrose Gwinnett Bierce (1842 – 1914?) was an American satirist, critic, poet, editor and journalist. Bierce became a prolific author of short stories often humorous and sometimes bitter or macabre. His dark, sardonic views and vehemence as a critic earned him the nickname, "Bitter Bierce".
"In Living with less, Joshua will guide you through biblical teachings on possessions and his own personal experience with minimalism--living with only the essential ... This book will challenge you to spend your hours, energy, and resources in ways that draw you closer to the heart of Jesus."--Page 4 of cover.
“Reading this will lead you to a better life.” —Dean Nelson, author of God Hides in Plain Sight In The 100 Thing Challenge Dave Bruno relates how he remade his life and regained his soul by getting rid of almost everything. But The 100 Thing Challenge is more than just the story of how one man started a movement to unhook himself from consumerism by winnowing his life’s possessions down to 100 things in one year. It’s also an inspiring, invigorating guide to how we all can begin to live simpler, more meaningful lives.
Francine Jay pioneered the simple living movement with her self-published bestseller, The Joy of Less. In this fully redesigned and repackaged edition—featuring never-before- seen content—Jay brings her philosophy to more readers who are eager to declutter. Rather than the "crash diet" approach found in other tidying up books, Jay shares simple steps to cultivate a minimalist mindset and form new habits, paving the way to lasting success. Her easy-to-follow STREAMLINE method works in any space—from a single drawer to a closet, room, or entire house. What's more, it can be called upon during clutter-inducing life events such as moving, getting married, having kids, or downsizing. With an airy two-color interior design and lovely hardcover package, The Joy of Less is a refreshing and relatable approach to decluttering that belongs in every home.
What exactly is happiness? Can we measure it? Why are some people happy and others not? And is there a drug that could eliminate all unhappiness? People all over the world, and throughout the ages, have thought about happiness, argued about its nature, and, most of all, desired it. But why do we have such a strong instinct to pursue happiness? And if happiness is good in itself, why haven't we simply evolved to be happier? Daniel Nettle uses the results of the latest psychological studies to ask what makes people happy and unhappy, what happiness really is, and to examine our urge to achieve it. Along the way we look at brain systems, at mind-altering drugs, and how happiness is now marketed to us as a commodity. Nettle concludes that while it may be unrealistic to expect lasting happiness, our evolved tendency to seek happiness drives us to achieve much that is worthwhile in itself. What is more, it seems to be not your particular circumstances that define whether you are happy so much as your attitude towards life. Happiness gives us the latest scientific insights into the nature of our feelings of well-being, and what these imply for how we might live our lives.
"What is a minimalist life? It's one that is stripped of the unnecessary, to make room for that which gives you joy. It's a removal of clutter in all its forms, leaving you with peace and freedom and lightness. A minimalist values quality, not quantity, in all forms." So writes Leo Babauta, the creator of Zen Habits and author of The Simple Guide to a Minimalist Life. A joy to read, this little book will help you clear out clutter, be content with less, and simplify your life--with tips on everything from creating a minimalist workspace to going paperless. In short, it will help you enjoy a simpler, happier life!
People don't know how to love the ones they love until they disappear from their lives. As he approaches thirty, Jody Grafton's career as a singer-songwriter falls apart: he loses his record deal, his money, his fame--even his desire to create new music. While he stares at the rubble of his one-hit-wonder musical career, his mother is diagnosed with lung cancer, his marriage ends abruptly, and Jody starts drinking heavily to deaden his new reality. When he hasn't a single reason left to live, he attempts suicide and ends up in a psych ward where he's prodded with questions he isn't yet prepared to answer. Amid the tailspin, Jody receives a phone call from his recently estranged girlfriend and she has unexpected news: she's pregnant. As a Decade Fades begins with this phone call. As his twenties twilight, Jody Grafton grapples with loneliness, depression, lust, and infatuation while glancing at the mounting wreckage in his rearview. When he can't fit--or force--the pieces of his life back together, he leaves his native Ohio to search for answers in the most unlikely of places.
Don’t Settle for More Most of us know we own too much stuff. We feel the weight and burden of our clutter, and we tire of cleaning and managing and organizing. While excess consumption leads to bigger houses, faster cars, fancier technology, and cluttered homes, it never brings happiness. Rather, it results in a desire for more. It redirects our greatest passions to things that can never fulfill. And it distracts us from the very life we wish we were living. Live a better life with less. In The More of Less, Joshua Becker helps you... • Recognize the life-giving benefits of owning less • Realize how all the stuff you own is keeping you from pursuing your dreams • Craft a personal, practical approach to decluttering your home and life • Experience the joys of generosity • Learn why the best part of minimalism isn’t a clean house, it’s a full life The beauty of minimalism isn’t in what it takes away. It’s in what it gives. Make Room in Your Life for What You Really Want “Maybe you don’t need to own all this stuff.” After a casual conversation with his neighbor on Memorial Day 2008, Joshua Becker realized he needed a change. He was spending far too much time organizing possessions, cleaning up messes, and looking for more to buy. So Joshua and his wife decided to remove the nonessential possessions from their home and life. Eventually, they sold, donated, or discarded over 60 percent of what they owned. In exchange, they found a life of more freedom, more contentment, more generosity, and more opportunity to pursue the things that mattered most. The More of Less delivers an empowering plan for living more by owning less. With practical suggestions and encouragement to personalize your own minimalist style, Joshua Becker shows you why minimizing possessions is the best way to maximize life. Are you ready for less cleaning, less anxiety, and less stress in your life? Simplicity isn’t as complicated as you think.
In this boxed set, we'll be tackling the familiar challenges of personal finance management... but in an unfamiliar way. INCLUDED IN THIS COLLECTION: BOOK 1: Rethinking Budgeting - How to Escape the Poverty Mindset and Create a Lifestyle That Works for You BOOK 2: The Minimalist Budget - A Practical Guide On How To Save Money, Spend Less And Live More With A Minimalist Lifestyle BOOK 3: Dollars & No Sense - Why Are You Spending Your Money Like An Idiot? DESCRIPTION: In this boxed set, we'll be tackling the familiar challenges of personal finance management... but in an unfamiliar way. If your main money problem is simply "I don't have enough of it!", you may be surprised at the approach these books will take. Here, you will NOT find the same old tips and tricks on how to save money by re-using teabags or buying rice in bulk. Instead, we'll get to the very heart of what money actually means, how we spend it and why, and what you can do to start using what you have right now to create a lifestyle that has meaning for you. "Budget" - it's a meager little word, one that all too often comes after "tight". Maybe you think of this word as an adjective, something to describe a cheap and substandard car or hotel. "Budget" brings to mind rationing... a kind of money diet. If you're like many people, budgeting is something you do with a kind of deflated spirit. Budgeting means bargain bin quality and the sad sense that what you want is going to be just out of reach. With these books, we'll try to go a little deeper. We'll consider the root causes of careless spending, as well as the three biggest but largely invisible money myths we all believe in to some extent. We'll then consider ways to start creating a budget that works for you and your goals, rather than against it. So much budget and personal finance advice out there is about solving problems using the same thinking that created them. These books will try a different approach to budgeting altogether. And it starts with a fact that many personal finance guides out there avoid like the plague. My hope with these books is that they'll give you a starting point to begin to reconsider your relationship to money and, by extension, your relationship to yourself and the world you live in. My hope is that you'll find something that inspires you to think differently and make different choices, ones that will leave you feeling more in control and more fulfilled than ever before. We each only have one life - here's to spending it wisely! WHAT ARE READERS SAYING? "This is definitely not just another cut-and-save type of book. While it does deliver a wealth of very solid advice on how to make drastic changes in your spending habits and provide great advice on how to save money in an variety of areas, it gave me so much more food for thought that I could ever have anticipated. This book ties all of the above into our own personal psychology and our attitudes about money, possessions and the role they play in our lives. The next time someone asks for advice on this topic, I will definitely recommend this collection." "This incredible guide is packed with information on how to revamp your lifestyle. The author breaks down multiple budgeting strategies and end with a step-by-step actionable plan. Plenty of food for thought, excellent strategies offered and nicely organized." "This is the type of book everyone should read. It takes on a gargantuan task: asking you to re-evaluate money as it pertains to your life personally, culturally, and literally." Grab your copy TODAY of this LIMITED EDITION boxed set!

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