Familiar Quotations MisgivingThe task of an American writer is not to describe the misgivings of a woman taken in adultery as she looks out of a window at the rain but to describe four hundred people under the lights reaching for a foul ball. This is ceremony.ndash;John CheeverMisgiving ndash; FearFear is a disease that eats away at logic and makes man inhuman.ndash;Marian AndersonFear is what kills us.ndash;AnonymousFear is the darkroom where negatives are developed.ndash;AnonymousFear is pain arising from the anticipation of evil.ndash;AristotleFear is met and destroyed with courage.ndash;James BellThe fear of being wrong is the prime inhibitor of the creative process.ndash;Jean BryantFear is the biggest motivator.ndash;Bill DixonHe without fear is king of the world.ndash;E. E. EddisonThe fear of death is the most unjustified of all fears, for there's no risk of accident for someone who's dead.ndash;Albert Einstein
Faith Taylor has a secret. Several, actually: One, she's been in love with her sister's husband, Myles Wellington, for years. Two, she's having his baby. Three, he doesn't know it. Myles is consumed with grief, having lost his wife to a terminal illness. Then he discovers that his late wife convinced her sister to be a surrogate to their baby. Torn between fury and gratitude, Myles insists that Faith move in so they can raise the child together, and unknowingly gets too close to Faith's biggest secret of all... until an even bigger secret threatens a loss neither ever imagined. Previously titled: Behind Closed Doors SHADES OF DECEPTION, in series order Just a Little Lie Just a Little Taboo Just a Little Misgiving Just a Little Sin OTHER TITLES by Mallory Rush Outlaws and Heroes, a three book series Bad Boy of New Orleans Hurts So Good Between the Sheets Half-Moon Hearts Kissed by the Beast
An intense, refractory memoir by a major poet Misgivings is C. K. Williams's searing recollection of his family's extreme dynamics and of his parents' deaths after years of struggle, bitterness, and inner conflict. Like Kafka's self-revealing Letter to His Father, Misgivings is full of doubt, both philosophical and personal, but as a work of art it is sure and true. Williams's father was an "ordinary businessman"--angry, demanding, addicted to the tension he created with the people he loved; a man who could read the Greek myths aloud to his son yet vowed never to apologize to anybody. His mother was a housewife, a woman with a great capacity for pleasure, who was stoical about the family's dire early poverty yet remained affected by it even when they became well-off. Together, these two formed what Williams calls the "conspiracy that made me who I am." His account of their life together and their deaths--his father's with suicidal despair, and his mother's with calm resignation--is a literary form of the reconciliation the family achieved at the end of his parents' lives. And as literary form it is novel, a series of brilliant short takes, a double helix of experience and recollection. Few contemporary writers have understood their origins so acutely, or so eloquently.
Misgivings of My Fraternity is an attempt to show to the reader the faults of our society. All stories present a question that must be thought over and also understood as to how they harm the growth of all as one unit, thanks to the discrimination and division that haunts us.
Christmas in Miami the city is wrapped in its own unique festive cheer, and countless children breathlessly await the arrival of Santa Claus. Except this year there are hundreds of Santas. Miami has been invaded by the Red Menace. An annual gathering of hundreds of red-suited, jolly old fat men and women swarm over the city, comical and annoying, until one of them turns up dead. In what should be a time of goodwill to all the Miami-Dade Crime Lab finds that what appears to be the simplest of crimes hides darker motives. Who would want to kill Santa? Who would go to such lengths to conceal the identity of a victim that they would decapitate him and remove both his hands? And how does a simple convenience store robbery suddenly spiral into an international incident of kidnapping and murder?
In her fifth case, Episcopal priest and cellist Lavinia Grey--Mother Vinnie to her friends--investigates some strange goings-on in her New Jersey suburb when a man discovers his father's remains are missing from the local cemetery.
Through the views of French travelers and diverse French studies about the United States, this book shows that the US took a pivotal place in French consciousness during the second half of the nineteenth century. The American landscape, skyscrapers, and the presence of Native and African Americans were puzzling and exotic to the French. At the same time, towns and industry were proof of an emerging economic power. Meanwhile, the French people found attractive models of social engineering in American society: schools and universities, the changing role of women, the emergence of the middle class. Even before World War I, the US found its place in French opinion, following trends that were to continue throughout the twentieth century: fascination and misgivings, attraction and repulsion.
Dr. Jordan Will is looking forward to the birth of her baby and a happy future with the private investigator, Cameron Baptiste, a gorgeous man who's sworn that he will love her child as his own. But when her past comes calling, Jordan is forced to turn away from Cam. Cameron Baptiste wanted the gorgeous doctor from the moment he met her. He managed to win her over-only to have her lock him out of her life. Worse: Outlaw Caldwell, president of the Death Dwellers MC, is growling about protecting Jordan from danger. What Outlaw doesn't understand is that Jordan is his, and no one is going to kick the ass of any danger to Cam's family except for him. He'll do anything to protect Jordan and the baby. Anything. This is a friends-to-lovers story, filled with sexual tension, intrigue, action, and the most notorious MC president around.
When Bill Casey, CFO of a conservative financial institution in Palm Beach, Florida, is recruited by 'Dawn Savings,' an upstart public company with fantastic earnings and growth, he makes the leap. Dawn's management, led by Ron Jameson, a cocky MBA from Harvard, is young and its operating practices are on the 'cutting edge' of the staid banking industry. Despite seething competition, Ron manages to inspire his staff and mesmerize his markets. However, when Dawn extends more credit than it should and control starts to flow to the borrowers, one in particular, who makes most of his decisions using emotion, fortune tellers, and voodoo-things become chaotic. Further complicating problems are two short-sellers from California, who do all they can to beat down the market. And Dawn begins to fall apart.
This volume of twelve interdisciplinary essays addresses the multifaceted nature of female religious identity in early modern Europe. By dismantling the boundaries between the academic disciplines of history, art history, musicology and literary studies it offers new cross-cultural readings essential to a more comprehensive understanding of the complexity of female spirituality in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.Consisting of four sections each dealing with different parts of Europe, and discussing issues of social and spiritual identity, such as the formation of community and memory, spiritual direction and secular patronage, this compelling collection offers a significant addition to a thriving field of study.
Communicating in the Third Space aims to clarify Homi K. Bhabha’s theory of the third space of enunciation by reconstructing its philosophical, sociological, geographical, and political meaning with attention to the special advantages and ambiguities that arise as it is applied in practical--as well as theoretical--contexts. The idea of "third space" conceives the encounter of two distinct and unequal social groups as taking place in a special third space of enunciation where culture is disseminated and displaced from the interacting groups, making way for the invention of a hybrid identity, whereby these two groups conceive themselves to partake in a common identity relating to shared space and common dialogue. The essays collected in Communicating in the Third Space--including a preface by Bhabha himself--brilliantly introduce readers to this exciting topic in Cultural and Post-Colonial theory and offers insightful elaboration and critique of the meaning and relevance of life in the "third space." With a preface by Homi K. Bhabha.
The major intellectual interest throughout this book is to offer a study on China's legal legacy, through Liang Shu-ming's eyes. The book follows the formula of the parallel between Life and Mind (人生与人心), Physis and Nomos, and compares Liang Shu-ming's narrative with his own practical orientation and with the theories of other interlocutors. The book puts Liang Shu-ming into the social context of modern Chinese history, in particular, the context of the unprecedented crisis of meaning in the legal realm and the collapse of a transcendental source for Chinese cultural identity in the light of modernity. The evaluation provided by this narrative could be helpful in clarifying the deep structures and significance of the present Chinese legal system through historically exploring Liang Shu-ming's misgivings. The book is intended for academics of legal, history and cultural studies. The book is unique in that it is the first book to explore New Confucian's considerations on reconstruction of Chinese legal system in the modern era. It presents a comprehensive systematical comparison of Liang Shu-ming's narrative about constitutional government in China against other schools of thought.

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