This substantially revised and expanded new edition of the bestselling textbook, addresses the difficulties that can arise with the mathematics that underpins the study of symmetry, and acknowledges that group theory can be a complex concept for students to grasp. Written in a clear, concise manner, the author introduces a series of programmes that help students learn at their own pace and enable to them understand the subject fully. Readers are taken through a series of carefully constructed exercises, designed to simplify the mathematics and give them a full understanding of how this relates to the chemistry. This second edition contains a new chapter on the projection operator method. This is used to calculate the form of the normal modes of vibration of a molecule and the normalised wave functions of hybrid orbitals or molecular orbitals. The features of this book include: * A concise, gentle introduction to symmetry and group theory * Takes a programmed learning approach * New material on projection operators, and the calcultaion of normal modes of vibration and normalised wave functions of orbitals This book is suitable for all students of chemistry taking a first course in symmetry and group theory.
The first edition, by P.R. Bunker, published in 1979, remains the sole textbook that explains the use of the molecular symmetry group in understanding high resolution molecular spectra. Since 1979 there has been considerable progress in the field and a second edition is required; the original author has been joined in its writing by Per Jensen. The Material of the first edition has been reorganized and much has been added. The molecular symmetry group is now introduced early on, and the explanation of how to determine nuclear spin statistical weights has been consolidated in one chapter, after groups, symmetry groups, character tables and the Hamiltonian have been introduced. A description of the symmetry in the three-dimensional rotation group K(spatial), irreducible spherical tensor operators, and vector coupling coefficients is now included. The chapters on energy levels and selection rules contain a great deal of material that was not in the first edition (much of it was undiscovered in 1979), concerning the Jahn-Teller effect, the Renner effect, Multichannel Quantum Defect Theory, the use of variational methods for calculating rotational-vibration energy levels, and the contact transformed rotation-vibration Hamiltonian. A new chapter is devoted entirely to weakly bound cluster molecules (often called Van der Waals molecules). A selection of experimental spectra is included in order to illustrate particular theoretical points.
This comprehensive text provides readers with a thorough introduction to molecular symmetry and group theory as applied to chemical problems. Its friendly writing style invites the reader to discover by example the power of symmetry arguments for understanding otherwise intimidating theoretical problems in chemistry. A unique feature demonstrates the centrality of symmetry and group theory to a complete understanding of the theory of structure and bonding." Fundamental Concepts." Representations of Groups." Techniques and Relationships for Chemical Applications." Symmetry and Chemical Bonding." Equations for Wave Functions." Vibrational Spectroscopy." Transition Metal Complexes.
Building on the foundation of the Second Edition, Symmetry and Structure: Readable Group Theory for Chemists, Third Edition turns the complex and potentially difficult subject of group theory into an accessible and readable account of this core area of chemistry. By using a diagrammatical approach and demonstrating the physical principles involved in understanding group theory, the text provides a non-mathematical, yet thorough, treatment of this broad topic. This new edition has been fully revised and updated to include a much more three-dimensional and accurate visualization of many of the key topics. The chapter on octahedral molecules is extended to cover the important topic of the ligand field theory of octahedral transition metal complexes. Problems and summaries are included at the end of each chapter, the book provides detailed answers to frequently asked questions, and numerous diagrams and tables are featured for ease of reading and to enhance student understanding. Symmetry and Structure: Readable Group Theory for Chemists, Third Edition is an essential textbook for all students, researchers and lecturers in chemistry, biochemistry, chemical engineering, physics and material science.
Symmetry and group theory provide us with a rigorous method for the description of the geometry of objects by describing the patterns in their structure. In chemistry it is a powerful concept that underlies many apparently disparate phenomena. Symmetry allows us to accurately describe the types of bonding that can occur between atoms or groups of atoms in molecules. It also governs the transitions that may occur between energy levels in molecular systems, leading to a predictive understanding of the absorption properties of molecules and hence their spectra. Molecular Symmetry lays out the formal language used in the area, with illustrative examples of particular molecules throughout. It then applies the ideas of symmetry and group theory to describe molecular structure, bonding in molecules and to consider the implications in spectroscopy. Topics covered include: Symmetry elements Symmetry operations and products of operations Point groups used with molecules Point group representations, matrices and basis sets Reducible and irreducible representations Applications in vibrational spectroscopy Molecular orbital theory of chemical bonding Molecular Symmetry is designed to introduce the subject by combining symmetry with spectroscopy and bonding in a clear and accessible manner. Each chapter ends with a summary of learning points, a selection of self-test questions, and suggestions for further reading. A set of appendices includes templates for paper models which will help students understand symmetry operations and cover key aspects of the material in depth. Molecular Symmetry is a must-have introduction to this fundamental topic for students of chemistry, and will also find a place on the bookshelves of postgraduates and researchers looking for a broad and modern introduction to the subject.
This book, divided into two parts, now in its second edition, presents the basic principles of group theory and their applications in chemical theories. While retaining the thorough coverage of the previous edition, the book in Part I, discusses the symmetry elements, point groups and construction of character tables for different point groups. In Part II, it describes the concept of hybridization to explain the shapes of molecules and analyzes the character tables to predict infrared and Raman active vibrational modes of molecules. It also brings into fore the molecular orbital theory and the techniques of group theory to interpret bonding in transition metal complexes and their electronic spectra. Finally, the book describes the crystal symmetry in detail as well as the Woodward–Hoffmann rules to determine the pathways of electrocyclic and cycloaddition reactions. NEW TO THE SECOND EDITION • New sections on Direct Product, Group–sub-group Relationships, Effect of Descent in Octahedral Symmetry on Degeneracy, Jahn–Teller Distortion, Group–sub-group Relationships and Electronic Spectra of Complexes and Influence of Coordination on the Infrared Spectra of Oxoanionic Ligands, Space Groups • Revised sections on Projection Operator, SALC Molecular Orbitals of Benzene and π-Molecular Orbitals of 1, 3-Butadiene KEY FEATURES • Provides mathematical foundations to understand group theory. • Includes several examples to illustrate applications of group theory. • Presents chapter-end exercises to help the students check their understanding of the subject matter. The book is designed for the senior undergraduate students and postgraduate students of Chemistry. It will also be of immense use to the researchers in the fields where group theory is applied.
The basics of group theory and its applications to themes such as the analysis of vibrational spectra and molecular orbital theory are essential knowledge for the undergraduate student of inorganic chemistry. The second edition of Group Theory for Chemists uses diagrams and problem-solving to help students test and improve their understanding, including a new section on the application of group theory to electronic spectroscopy. Part one covers the essentials of symmetry and group theory, including symmetry, point groups and representations. Part two deals with the application of group theory to vibrational spectroscopy, with chapters covering topics such as reducible representations and techniques of vibrational spectroscopy. In part three, group theory as applied to structure and bonding is considered, with chapters on the fundamentals of molecular orbital theory, octahedral complexes and ferrocene among other topics. Additionally in the second edition, part four focuses on the application of group theory to electronic spectroscopy, covering symmetry and selection rules, terms and configurations and d-d spectra. Drawing on the author’s extensive experience teaching group theory to undergraduates, Group Theory for Chemists provides a focused and comprehensive study of group theory and its applications which is invaluable to the student of chemistry as well as those in related fields seeking an introduction to the topic. Provides a focused and comprehensive study of group theory and its applications, an invaluable resource to students of chemistry as well as those in related fields seeking an introduction to the topic Presents diagrams and problem-solving exercises to help students improve their understanding, including a new section on the application of group theory to electronic spectroscopy Reviews the essentials of symmetry and group theory, including symmetry, point groups and representations and the application of group theory to vibrational spectroscopy
Symmetry: An Introduction to Group Theory and its Application is an eight-chapter text that covers the fundamental bases, the development of the theoretical and experimental aspects of the group theory. Chapter 1 deals with the elementary concepts and definitions, while Chapter 2 provides the necessary theory of vector spaces. Chapters 3 and 4 are devoted to an opportunity of actually working with groups and representations until the ideas already introduced are fully assimilated. Chapter 5 looks into the more formal theory of irreducible representations, while Chapter 6 is concerned largely with quadratic forms, illustrated by applications to crystal properties and to molecular vibrations. Chapter 7 surveys the symmetry properties of functions, with special emphasis on the eigenvalue equation in quantum mechanics. Chapter 8 covers more advanced applications, including the detailed analysis of tensor properties and tensor operators. This book is of great value to mathematicians, and math teachers and students.
Winner of a 2005 CHOICE Outstanding Academic Book Award Molecular symmetry is an easily applied tool for understanding and predicting many of the properties of molecules. Traditionally, students are taught this subject using point groups derived from the equilibrium geometry of the molecule. Fundamentals of Molecular Symmetry shows how to set up symmetry groups for molecules using the more general idea of energy invariance. It is no more difficult than using molecular geometry and one obtains molecular symmetry groups. The book provides an introductory description of molecular spectroscopy and quantum mechanics as the foundation for understanding how molecular symmetry is defined and used. The approach taken gives a balanced account of using both point groups and molecular symmetry groups. Usually the point group is only useful for isolated, nonrotating molecules, executing small amplitude vibrations, with no tunneling, in isolated electronic states. However, for the chemical physicist or physical chemist who wishes to go beyond these limitations, the molecular symmetry group is almost always required.
Market_Desc: · Graduate and Advanced Undergraduate Students About The Book: This book retains the easy-to-read format and informal flavor of the previous editions, and includes new material on the symmetric properties of extended arrays (crystals), projection operators, LCAO molecular orbitals, and electron counting rules. It also contains many new exercises and illustrations.
Spectra of Atoms and Molecules, 2nd Edition is designed to introduce advanced undergraduates and new graduate students to the vast field of spectroscopy. Of interest to chemists, physicists, astronomers, atmospheric scientists, and engineers, it emphasizes the fundamental principles of spectroscopy with its primary goal being to teach students how to interpret spectra. The book includes a clear presentation of group theory needed for understanding the material and a large number of excellent problems are found at the end of each chapter. In keeping with the visual aspects of the course, the author provides a large number of diagrams and spectra specifically recorded for this book. Topics such as molecular symmetry, matrix representation of groups, quantum mechanics, and group theory are discussed. Analyses are made of atomic, rotational, vibrational, and electronic spectra. Spectra of Atoms and Molecules, 2nd Edition has been updated to include the 1998 revision of physical constants, and conforms more closely to the recommended practice for the use of symbols and units. This new edition has also added material pertaining to line intensities, which can be confusing due to the dozens of different units used to report line and band strengths. Another major change is in author Peter Bernath's discussion of the Raman effect and light scattering, where the standard theoretical treatment is now included. Aimed at new students of spectroscopy regardless of their background, Spectra of Atoms and Molecules will help demystify spectroscopy by showing the necessary steps in a derivation.
Concise, self-contained introduction to group theory and its applications to chemical problems. Symmetry, matrices, molecular vibrations, transition metal chemistry, more. Relevant math included. Advanced-undergraduate/graduate-level. 1973 edition.
Informal, effective undergraduate-level text introduces vibrational and electronic spectroscopy, presenting applications of group theory to the interpretation of UV, visible, and infrared spectra without assuming a high level of background knowledge. 200 problems with solutions. Numerous illustrations. "A uniform and consistent treatment of the subject matter." — Journal of Chemical Education.
Graduate-level text develops group theory relevant to physics and chemistry and illustrates their applications to quantum mechanics, with systematic treatment of quantum theory of atoms, molecules, solids. 1964 edition.
Group theory is an essential part of undergraduate chemistry courses. This accessible supplementary text, teaches the subject from a practical point of view, with worked examples and model answers provided throughout. Its clear, non-technical approach allows students without a mathematical background to be able to complete the exercises in the book.
Illustrating the fascinating interplay between physics and mathematics, Groups, Representations and Physics, Second Edition provides a solid foundation in the theory of groups, particularly group representations. For this new, fully revised edition, the author has enhanced the book's usefulness and widened its appeal by adding a chapter on the Cartan-Dynkin treatment of Lie algebras. This treatment, a generalization of the method of raising and lowering operators used for the rotation group, leads to a systematic classification of Lie algebras and enables one to enumerate and construct their irreducible representations. Taking an approach that allows physics students to recognize the power and elegance of the abstract, axiomatic method, the book focuses on chapters that develop the formalism, followed by chapters that deal with the physical applications. It also illustrates formal mathematical definitions and proofs with numerous concrete examples.
Explains the underlying structure that unites all disciplines in chemistry Now in its second edition, this book explores organic, organometallic, inorganic, solid state, and materials chemistry, demonstrating how common molecular orbital situations arise throughout the whole chemical spectrum. The authors explore the relationships that enable readers to grasp the theory that underlies and connects traditional fields of study within chemistry, thereby providing a conceptual framework with which to think about chemical structure and reactivity problems. Orbital Interactions in Chemistry begins by developing models and reviewing molecular orbital theory. Next, the book explores orbitals in the organic-main group as well as in solids. Lastly, the book examines orbital interaction patterns that occur in inorganic–organometallic fields as well as cluster chemistry, surface chemistry, and magnetism in solids. This Second Edition has been thoroughly revised and updated with new discoveries and computational tools since the publication of the first edition more than twenty-five years ago. Among the new content, readers will find: Two new chapters dedicated to surface science and magnetic properties Additional examples of quantum calculations, focusing on inorganic and organometallic chemistry Expanded treatment of group theory New results from photoelectron spectroscopy Each section ends with a set of problems, enabling readers to test their grasp of new concepts as they progress through the text. Solutions are available on the book's ftp site. Orbital Interactions in Chemistry is written for both researchers and students in organic, inorganic, solid state, materials, and computational chemistry. All readers will discover the underlying structure that unites all disciplines in chemistry.
This text for advanced undergraduate and graduate students guides the reader through a smooth progression from the most elementary ideas of molecular orbital theory to an understanding of the electronic structure, geometry, and reactivity of large molecules. It starts with simple molecules and proceeds to relatively large organometallic complexes. The slant is theoretical, but in the last chapter the authors strengthen the link between theory and experiment. Focusing on basic concepts, the authors take a qualitative approach, which enables this text to fill a void in the undergraduate curriculum. The book is intended as a core or supplementary text in an advanced chemistry course.

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