MMS has evolved from the huge popularity of the SMS text servicefor GSM networks. It is a departure from the transport mechanismused for SMS (which is based on the GSM signalling channels) to theuse of IP to transport messages within the MMS network. To this endMMS has similarities with Internet email and standard IETFprotocols. As with any new technology it is difficult to accuratelypredict the position within the next 5 years, although based onprevious experience with WAP and SMS it would be fair to say thatthese protocols will increase in usage over the next 5 years andbecome legacy for a further 5 years following which, users willmigrate onto the next wave of messaging. Significant revenue growthand data usage is expected to be driven by consumer usage of MMS. But MMS technology offers more than just a broadening of messagecontent. With MMS, it is not only possible to send your multimediamessages from one phone to another, but also from phone to email,and vice versa. This feature dramatically increases thepossibilities of mobile communication, both for private andcorporate use. Multimedia messaging will reshape the landscape of mobilecommunication, making it more personal, more versatile, and moreexpressive than ever before. MMS: Is the first book to address how MMS (and the use of IP totransport messages) will affect existing infrastructure andbusiness models Covers the fundamental changes to mail and billing systems Includes future recommendations, such as interoperability andevolution Presents an overview of the MMS technology components Drawing on the authors hands-on experience in the implementationof MMS technology (developing, billing and delivering services) atBT, this innovative book will appeal to engineering managers,network operators, market analysts, business decision makers,content providers and operator organizations.
The theme of the book is the distribution and abundance of organisms in space and time. The core of the book lies in how local births and deaths are tied to emigration and immigration processes, and how environmental variability at different scales affects population dynamics with stochastic processes and spatial structure and shows how elementary analytical tools can be used to understand population fluctuations, synchrony, processes underlying range distributions and community structure and species coexistence. The book also shows how spatial population dynamics models can be used to understand life history evolution and aspects of evolutionary game theory. Although primarily based on analytical and numerical analyses of spatial population processes, data from several study systems are also dealt with.
In his highly anticipated sequel to The Elements, Theodore Gray demonstrates how the elements of the periodic table combine to form the molecules that make up our world. Everything physical is made up of the elements and the infinite variety of molecules they form when they combine with each other. In Molecules, Theodore Gray takes the next step in the grand story that began with the periodic table in his best-selling book, The Elements: A Visual Exploration of Every Known Atom in the Universe. Here, he explores through fascinating stories and trademark stunning photography the most interesting, essential, useful, and beautiful of the millions of chemical structures that make up every material in the world. Gray begins with an explanation of how atoms bond to form molecules and compounds, as well as the difference between organic and inorganic chemistry. He then goes on to explore the vast array of materials molecules can create, including: soaps and solvents; goops and oils; rocks and ores; ropes and fibers; painkillers and dangerous drugs; sweeteners; perfumes and stink bombs; colors and pigments; and controversial compounds including asbestos, CFCs, and thimerosal. Theodore Gray is the author of The Elements: A Visual Exploration of Every Known Atom in the Universe; Theo Gray's Mad Science: Experiments You Can Do At Home, But Probably Shouldn't; Mad Science 2: Experiments You Can Do At Home, But Still Probably Shouldn't; and Popular Science magazine's "Gray Matter" column. With his company Touch Press, Gray is the developer of best-selling iPad and iPhone apps, including The Elements, Solar System, Disney Animated, The Orchestra, The Waste Land, and Skulls by Simon Winchester. He lives in Urbana, Illinois. Nick Mann is the photographer of The Elements: A Visual Exploration of Every Known Atom in the Universe. Aside from having photographed more elements and compounds than probably anyone in the world, he is an accomplished landscape, sports, and event photographer. He lives in Urbana, Illinois.
MMS - an amazing substance that consists of three atoms - can eliminate a large number of pathogens. In this book a medical doctor addresses the subject of MMS for the first time.
The Mesoamerican population who lived near the indigenous cultivation sites of the "Chocolate Tree" (Theobromo cacao) had a multitude of documented applications of chocolate as medicine, ranging from alleviating fatigue to preventing heart ailments to treating snakebite. Until recently, these applications have received little sound scientific scrutiny. Rather, it has been the reputed health claims stemming from Europe and the United States which have attracted considerable biomedical attention. This book, for the first time, describes the centuries-long quest to uncover chocolate's potential health benefits. The authors explore variations in the types of evidence used to support chocolate's use as medicine as well as note the ongoing tension over categorizing chocolate as food or medicine, and more recently, as functional food or nutraceutical. The authors, Wilson an historian of science and medicine, and Hurst an analytical chemist in the chocolate industry, bring their collective insights to bear upon the development of ideas and practices surrounding the use of chocolate as medicine. Chocolate's use in this manner is explored first among the Mesoamerican peoples, then as it is transported to Europe, and back into Colonial North America. The authors then focus upon more recent bioscience experimental undertakings which have been aimed to ascertain both long-standing and novel suggestions as to chocolate's efficacy as a medicinal and a nutritional substance. Chocolate/s reputation as the most craved food boosts this book's appeal to food and biomedical scientists, cacao researchers, ethnobotanists, historians, folklorists, and healers of all types as well as to the general reading audience.
Molecules of Murder is about infamous murderers and famous victims; about people like Harold Shipman, Alexander Litvinenko, Adelaide Bartlett, and Georgi Markov. Few books on poisons analyse these crimes from the viewpoint of the poison itself, doing so throws a new light on how the murders or attempted murders were carried out and ultimately how the perpetrators were uncovered and brought to justice. Part I includes molecules which occur naturally and were originally used by doctors before becoming notorious as murder weapons. Part II deals with unnatural molecules, mainly man-made, and they too have been dangerously misused in famous crimes. The book ends with the most famous poisoning case in recent years, that of Alexander Litvinenko and his death from polonium chloride. The first half of each chapter starts by looking at the target molecule itself, its discovery, its history, its chemistry, its use in medicine, its toxicology, and its effects on the human body. The second half then investigates a famous murder case and reveals the modus operandi of the poisoner and how some were caught, some are still at large, and some literally got away with murder. Molecules of Murder will explain how forensic chemists have developed cunning ways to detect minute traces of dangerous substances, and explain why some of these poisons, which appear so life-threatening, are now being researched as possible life-savers. Award winning science writer John Emsley has assembled another group of true crime and chemistry stories to rival those of his highly acclaimed Elements of Murder.
Molecular models are as vital a tool for the study of chemistry as calculators are for the study of mathematics. Molecular Visions models may be assembled in infinite combinations enabling the user to construct not only familiar configurations but also undiscovered possibilities. Models are intended to inspire the imagination, stimulate thought, and assist the visualization process. They present the user with a solid form of an abstract object that can otherwise only be visualized by the chemist. While chemistry textbooks use letters and graphics to describe molecules, molecular models make them "real". MOLECULAR VISIONS Organic Kit #1 is in a green plastic box, 9"x4"x2"
Written for the laboratory that accompanies the sophomore/junior level courses in Organic Chemistry, Zubrick provides students with a valuable guide to the basic techniques of the Organic Chemistry lab. The book will help students understand and practice good lab safety. It will also help students become familiar with basic instrumentation, techniques and apparatus and help them master the latest techniques such as interpretation of infrared spectroscopy. The guide is mostly macroscale in its orientation.
A Flash of Light is an intriguing book that starts at the beginning of time itself and then winds its way through a host of fascinating light related topics including the hues of aliens sunsets, the psychology of colour, and the chemistry of LCD screens. Written as part of a novel experiment, editors Mark Lorch and Andy Miah hatched a plan to collect a critical mass of academics in a room and charged them with writing a popular science book, under the watchful eye of the general public at the Manchester Science Festival. The result is an enlightening look into the science behind colour and light, encompassing biology, chemistry and physics and including simple and fun “try this at home” ideas to illustrate the concepts covered. Drawing on the experience of some of the UK’s best science communicators, this book will appeal to anyone with an interest in science. Its pacey, witty and engaging tone provides illuminating insight into how and why we see the universe the way we do.
How can a plant as beautiful as the foxglove be so deadly and yet for more than a century be used to treat heart disease? The same is true of other naturally occurring molecules as will be revealed in this current book by award-winning author and chemist, John Emsley. More Molecules of Murder follows on from his highly-acclaimed earlier book Molecules of Murder, and again it deals with 14 potential poisons; seven of which are man-made and seven of which are natural. It investigates the crimes committed with them, not from the point of view of the murderers, their victims, or the detectives, but from the poison used. In so doing it throws new light on how these crimes were carried out and ultimately how the perpetrators were uncovered and brought to justice. Each chapter starts by looking at the target molecule itself, its discovery, its chemistry, its often-surprising use in medicine, its effects on the human body, and its toxicology. The rest of the chapter is devoted to murders and attempted murders in which it has been used. But, be reassured that murder by poison is not the threat it once was, thanks to laws which restrict access to such materials and to the skills of analytical chemists in detecting their presence in incredibly tiny amounts.
Ice cream as we recognize it today has been in existence for at least 300 years, though its origins probably go much further back in time. Before the development of refrigeration, ice cream was a luxury reserved for special occasions but its advance to commercial manufacture was helped by the first ice cream making machine patented by Nancy Johnson in Philadelphia in the 1840s. The second edition of The Science of Ice Cream has been fully revised and updated with new material. The book still begins with the history of ice cream, subsequent chapters looking at the link between the microscopic and macroscopic properties and how these relate to the ultimate texture of the product you eat. Information on nutritional aspects and developments in new products and processes for making ice cream have been added and the books is completed with some suggestions for experiments relating to ice cream and how to make it at home or in a school laboratory. The book has authenticity and immediacy, being written by an active industrial practitioner, and is ideal for undergraduate food science students as well as those working in the food industry. It is also accessible to the general reader who has studied science to A-level and provides teachers with ideas for using ice cream to illustrate scientific principles.
Bring out your students' theatrical qualities with our range of AQA A Level Drama and Theatre Studies resources, which combine author insight of contempary theatre with and experience of teaching.
Introducing basic chemistry through everyday foods and meal preparations, this book is a fascinating read for anyone interested in the science behind cooking.
The Guardian's Best Science Book of 2017 One of Science News's Favorite Science Books of 2017 The fascinating science and history of the air we breathe It's invisible. It's ever-present. Without it, you would die in minutes. And it has an epic story to tell. In Caesar's Last Breath, New York Times bestselling author Sam Kean takes us on a journey through the periodic table, around the globe, and across time to tell the story of the air we breathe, which, it turns out, is also the story of earth and our existence on it. With every breath, you literally inhale the history of the world. On the ides of March, 44 BC, Julius Caesar died of stab wounds on the Senate floor, but the story of his last breath is still unfolding; in fact, you're probably inhaling some of it now. Of the sextillions of molecules entering or leaving your lungs at this moment, some might well bear traces of Cleopatra's perfumes, German mustard gas, particles exhaled by dinosaurs or emitted by atomic bombs, even remnants of stardust from the universe's creation. Tracing the origins and ingredients of our atmosphere, Kean reveals how the alchemy of air reshaped our continents, steered human progress, powered revolutions, and continues to influence everything we do. Along the way, we'll swim with radioactive pigs, witness the most important chemical reactions humans have discovered, and join the crowd at the Moulin Rouge for some of the crudest performance art of all time. Lively, witty, and filled with the astounding science of ordinary life, Caesar's Last Breath illuminates the science stories swirling around us every second.
This brief guidebook assists you in mastering the difficult concept of pushing electrons that is vital to your success in Organic Chemistry. With an investment of only 12 to 16 hours of self-study you can have a better understanding of how to write resonance structures and will become comfortable with bond-making and bond-breaking steps in organic mechanisms. A paper-on-pencil approach uses active involvement and repetition to teach you to properly push electrons to generate resonance structures and write organic mechanisms with a minimum of memorization. Compatible with any organic chemistry textbook. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
Why does chocolate taste so good? Why do we seek 'the one'? How do traits such as intelligence, creativity and violence arise and what purpose do they serve? This book links these characteristics to the origins of life, showing that the conditions necessary to bring life into existence echo through our modern day behaviour. The chemistry of the body is not only fascinating but also highly relevant to everyone, since we are all concerned with maximising our health and enjoyment of life. Currently, there are not many popular science books concerned with biochemistry. One reason for this might be the particularly complex nature of the science involved. This book starts with the fundamentals and then works towards a deeper understanding of the chemistry of human nature. Essential reading for anyone with an interest in this science and written at a level accessible to experts and non-experts alike.
In this second edition of The Sociology of Food and Agriculture, students are provided with a substantially revised and updated introductory text to this emergent field. The book begins with the recent development of agriculture under capitalism and neo-liberal regimes, and the transformation of farming and peasant agriculture from a small-scale, family-run way of life to a globalized system. Topics such as the global hunger and obesity challenges, GM foods, and international trade and subsidies are assessed as part of the world food economy. The final section concentrates on themes of sustainability, food security, and food sovereignty. The book concludes on a positive note, examining alternative agri-food movements aimed at changing foodscapes at levels from the local to the global. With increased coverage of the financialization of food, food and culture, gender, ethnicity and justice, food security, and food sovereignty, the book is perfect for students with little or no background in sociology and is also suitable for more advanced courses as a comprehensive primer. All chapters include learning objectives, suggested discussion questions, and recommendations for further reading to aid student learning.
Piperidine-Based Drug Discovery outlines the complexities of Piperidine scaffold use in drug discovery, including derivative chemistry, structural properties, methods of synthesis and practical implementations. Piperidine scaffolds are the cornerstones of over 70 commercialized drugs (including multiple blockbusters). Designed as a guide for both experts and students working in this and related areas, it is hoped that this volume will encourage and inspire the continued design and development of novel pharmaceuticals based on Piperidine and its derivatives. Heterocyclic compounds are of central importance to medicinal chemistry, as demonstrated by the high percentage of marketable drugs that feature heterocyclic fragments in their structures. As starting points for drug discovery they offer a broad range of attractive properties, and a detailed understanding of the particular characteristics of each is of great benefit to researchers. The most commonly used heterocycle among US FDA approved pharmaceuticals, Piperidine is an extremely important building block in the synthesis of medicinal agents. This heterocycle and its derivatives exhibit a number of important functionalities and have been employed variously as CNS modulators, antiaggregants, anticoagulants, antihistamines, anti-cancer drugs and analgesics. Explores this extremely important heterocycle to a high level of detail Describes synthesis methods for 70 current drugs based on Piperidine scaffolds Gives drug designers all the key knowledge required to develop new drugs utilizing Piperidine Provides pharmacologists a solid overview of the chemical background of existing Piperidine-based drugs
Biopolymers such as cellulose, lignin, starch, pectin, chitin, xylan, etc. are copiously available in nature in the form of plant biomass. They have been used for various applications such as biofuels, nanobiocomposites, biomedicine, etc. Biopolymers have unique antimicrobial properties, and are thus used for food packaging. The field of biomaterials is interdisciplinary and includes chemistry, biology and medicine. There are different ways to apply biopolymers for the benefit of our society. Although natural polymers are cheap and available in large quantities, it is still difficult to utilise their potentials. Still, there are challenges to develop new methodologies for the efficient and economic utilisation of these biopolymers. Consequently, the modification of these materials is the focus of recent scientific research. These modifications improve the various properties of biopolymers required for specific applications. Modifications improve heat, moisture resistance, solubility in water, sustainability, flexibility, compatibility, biodegradability, etc. Biopolymers modified by blending shows considerable improvement in the impact resistance of brittle polymers. Biopolymer systems containing particles with one or more dimensions in the nanometer scale are called bionanocomposites, a special class of materials possessing unique thermal stability, fire resistance, mechanical and optical properties. Bionanocomposites have been effectively used in controlled drug delivery, food packaging, etc.
Get 12 months FREE access to an interactive eBook* when you buy the paperback! (Print paperback version only, ISBN 9781446274095) To find out more and for a preview of the new edition visit https://study.sagepub.com/journalism Journalism: Principles & Practice remains the essential textbook for all students of journalism. With each print copy of the new third edition, you receive FREE access to the interactive eBook edition offering on-the-go access to a wealth of digital resources including video tutorials from the author. This book is the must-have guide to everything you need to know about how journalism works. The new edition is fully updated to cover the new essentials: social media, the impact of Twitter, and the need for an ethical approach. This book will equip you with all the skills and savvy you need to become the resourceful yet ethical journalists of the future. New and improved features will help you: Get to grips with the huge impact of social and mobile media on how we gather information and tell stories Grasp the rights and wrongs of journalism with a new chapter on ethics and regulation Learn how to make the most of your skills with tips from journalists such as Cathy Newman and Andrew Norfolk Think through ‘what would you do?' in a new feature that takes you into the real world of journalism at the end of every chapter This new edition retains its innovative two-column structure, stylishly blending theory and practice. As relevant to the newsroom as the seminar room, it is the one book you will need to take you through your degree and into your career as a journalist. *interactivity only available through Vitalsource eBook

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