A young woman fights for survival amid the brutality of the last Ice Age It’s 7056 BC, a time before history. On the first day that Chagak’s womanhood is acknowledged within her Aleut tribe, she unexpectedly finds herself betrothed to Seal Stalker, the most promising young hunter in the village. A bright future lies ahead of Chagak—but in one violent moment, she loses her entire way of life. Left with her infant brother, Pup, and only a birdskin parka for warmth, Chagak sets out across the icy waters on a quest for survival and revenge. Mother Earth Father Sky is the first book of the Ivory Carver Trilogy, which also includes My Sister the Moon and Brother Wind.
An anthology of poetry celebrates the natural wonders of our world and details the human responsibility toward preserving the planet, in works by C. S. Lewis, Christina Rossetti, Joseph Langland, William Stafford, and other notable authors.
Examines the myths and beliefs of Native Americans.
Their intelligence and perception still rings true: Native American tribal leaders such as Tecumseh, Sitting Bull, and Chief Joseph share their wisdom from the ages.
Father Sky and Mother Earth filled the world with plants and animals, and everyone lived in peace and happiness ... until Human Animals came along with their noise, rubbish, smoke and oil. This cautionary story, accompanied by colourful illustrations on every facing page, has a happy ending. Discover how the worried Human Animals stop the destruction. This new edition of Father Sky and Mother Earth, published 15 years after Oodgeroo's death, contains a vital message as relevant today as it was when the story was first published in 1981.
To the Navajo, sandpaintings are sacred, living entities that reflect the interconnectedness of all living beings--humans, plants, stars, animals, and mountains. This book, now available in paperback, explores the circularity of Navajo thought in sandpaintings, Navajo chantway myths, and stories reflected in the celestial constellations. Beautifully illustrated by the author, this well-documented book explores the spiritual world of the Navajo, their ceremonial practices, and their conceptions of time and stellar motion. Griffin-Pierce shows how the images of sacred sandpaintings not only communicate the temporal and spatial dimensions of the Navajo universe but also present, in visual form, Navajo ideas about relationships among nature, self, and society. "Griffin-Pierce's approach is highly original, bringing this material together in an innovative and creative manner while grounding it holistically within the context of Navajo world view."--M. Jane Young, author ofSigns from the Ancestors: Zuni Cultural Symbolism and Perceptions of Rock Art
In prehistoric Alaska, an Aleut girl, unwanted and abused, changes the destiny of her tribe Gray Bird wanted only sons. His daughter, Kiin, would have been killed at birth to make way for a male heir if not for the tribal chief, Kayugh, who claimed the infant as a future wife for one of his two young sons. Sixteen years later, Kiin is caught between the two brothers: one to whom she is promised, the other whom she desires. But the evil spawned by her own family takes her far from her people to a place where savage cruelties, love, and fate will strengthen and change her, and lead her to her ultimate destiny. My Sister the Moon is book two of the Ivory Carver Trilogy, which also includes Mother Earth Father Sky and Brother Wind.
Now in one volume, the sweeping Native American trilogy set at the dawn of human civilization in Alaska, from an international-bestselling author. Following the lives of three incredible Aleut women in prehistoric Alaska, the Ivory Carver Trilogy has been hailed as “more successful than Clan of the Cave Bear” by the Washington Post Book World and “moving and credible” by the New York Times Book Review. Now, experience all three insightful and touching novels in this one epic volume. Mother Earth Father Sky: After her tribe is slaughtered, a young woman, Chagak, is left alone to care for her infant brother. With nothing left to lose, she sets out on a dangerous quest for survival—and revenge—among the icy waters, vicious enemies, and frozen tundra of Alaska. My Sister the Moon: Kiin has been betrothed to the son of the tribal chief since birth, but her heart belongs to his brother. When she is suddenly taken from her people, hardships, love, and chance will change Kiin—and ultimately lead her to a new destiny. Brother Wind: Finally content with her hard-won life, Kiin is devastated when she’s thrust back into the nightmares of her past. Across the land, Kukutux, the wife of a Whale Hunter, faces starvation and hostility when she finds herself widowed. As their paths converge, the two women must find the strength in their hearts to withstand the cruelties of man, nature, and fate. Filled with impeccable research and extraordinary characters, the Ivory Carver Trilogy is an unforgettable, must-read saga of family, love, survival, and history.
This study brings together three closely related aspects of Maori literature - myth, memory and identity. It examines selected novels by Witi Ihimaera and Patricia Grace in order to trace an ever-developing Maori identity that has changed considerably over three decades of the Maori novel. This book demonstrates that an investigation of the construction of identity in literature benefits from a close look at the importance of Maori mythology as well as associated cultural and individual memories. Indicating that Maori fiction has become what Homi Bhabha terms a third space, this book verifies the links between novel, myth and memory with the help of existing research in these areas in order to assess their importance for the reinterpretation of identity. The Maori novels that depict situations reflecting current issues are viewed as an experimental playground in which authors can explore a variety of solutions to tribal, societal and political issues. This study establishes the early novels as reinterpretations of the past and guides to the future, and characterises the more recent novels as representing a move towards empowerment and pioneering that has not yet come to a conclusion.
As two women from different Aleut tribes struggle against their harsh fates, they find their extraordinary destinies intertwined In the tribe of the First Men, courageous, beautiful Kiin, an accomplished ivory carver, is finally content with her hard-won life, which includes twin sons and a loving warrior husband. When she is suddenly pulled back into her nightmarish former existence as slave to the Raven, shaman of the Walrus People, her husband’s brother, Samiq, vows to bring her back to their tribe. Across the land, Kukutux, the wife of a Whale Hunter, finds the loss of her husband and the hostility of her clan too much to bear. The lives of Kiin, Samiq, and Kukutux, and the paths of their tribesmen will converge in a final dramatic confrontation that tests the strength of their hearts and spirits against the cruelty of man, nature, and fate. Brother Wind is the final book of the Ivory Carver Trilogy, which also includes Mother Earth Father Sky and My Sister the Moon.
Presents a brief history of the Navajos and a large section of black and white photographs of their land and people.
Two ancient tribes on the verge of making peace become foes once more when a double murder jeopardizes a storyteller’s mission Eighty centuries ago, in the frozen land that is now Alaska, a clubfooted male child had been left to die, when a woman named K’os rescued him. Twenty years later and no longer a child, Chakliux occupies the revered role as his tribe’s storyteller. In the neighboring village of the Near River people, where Chakliux will attempt to make peace by wedding the shaman’s daughter, a double murder occurs that sends him on a harsh, enthralling journey in search of the truth about the tragic losses his people have suffered, and into the arms of a woman he was never meant to love. Song of the River is the first book of the Storyteller Trilogy, which also includes Cry of the Wind and Call Down the Stars.
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Drawn from a variety of indigenous peoples of North America, these stories preserve the voices of Native communities by depicting their perspectives on creation, the origins of fire, the paths of their spiritual journeys, respect for the Earth, and more.
Discusses the culture, history, and society of the Pueblos.
Mother Earth, Brother Sun, Sister Moon is an entertaining short story that passes on lessons of family love, conservation, and the beauty of the earth. Take a hike through nature with a father and son and reintroduce yourself to the wonders of our world as well as humanity's role in its conservation.
A Chinese peasant overcomes the forces of nature and the frailties of human nature to become a wealthy landowner.
In the icy land of prehistoric Alaska, two heroic storytellers bring to life the final chapter of their ancestors: the star-crossed lovers Chakliux and Aqamdax A handsome young tribal warrior and sage, Yikaas has traveled across the sea to hear stories of the Whale Hunter and the Sea Hunter peoples. Around the fire, Qumalix, a beguiling and beautiful storyteller, barely old enough to be a wife, catches the eye of Yikaas, and so begins their flirtation through storytelling, which brings to vivid life tales of the Near River and Cousin River tribes. The fates of lovers Chakliux and Aqamdax, and their wicked nemesis K’os, are revealed as Yikaas and Qumalix weave together tales from their ancestors’ past—and tales from their own lives. Call Down the Stars is the final book of the Storyteller Trilogy, which also includes Song of the River and Cry of the Wind.

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