'Music in the United States' is a basic textbook for any introduction to American music course. Each American music culture is covered with an introductory article and case studies of the featured culture.
"Music cultures in sounds, words and images", edited by Antonio Baldassarre and Tatjana Markovic, is dedicated to the 60th birthday of the Croatian-American musicologist Zdravko Blažekovic (b. 1956, Zagreb). After his studies of musicology and first working experiences in Zagreb, Blažekovic moved to New York City, where he is since 1996 the executive editor of the RILM - Répertoire International de Littérature Musicale, and since 1998 director of the RCMI - Research Center for Music Iconography as well as editor of one of the leading journals for music iconography, "Music in Art", in the framework of the Barry S. Brook Center for Music Reserach and Documentation at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. In view of Blažekovic's very broad multidisciplinary interests, including historical musicology, music iconography, organology, archeology, lexicography and databases, this book contains 38 studies in six languages (English, German, Italian, Serbian, Croatian, Chinese) organized in six chapters: Sounds of nations, Words on musics, Performance of musical cultures, Images on musics, Organology, and Classifying data on music.
Volume 2 in a series of monographs entitled 'Australian Studies in the History, Philosophy and Social Studies of Music'. It contains papers presented at the symposium of the International Musicological Society and Festival of Music, held in Melbourne in 1988. The authors look at a range of situations involving two or three or several music cultures in contact over a considerable period. Geographical areas studied include Andean Ecuador, Australia, the Central Balkans, Fiji, India, Java, Italy, Russia, the United States and Vietnam. Includes an index and notes on the contributors. The editors are the Australian ethnomusicologist Margaret Kartomi and the US ethnomusicologist Stephen Blum. Professor Kartomi is head of the department of music at Monash University and Professor Blum is professor of music at the graduate centre, City University of New York.
Collects lyrics from blues recordings made by Black Americans and sold in Black communities following the war
Winner of the Northeast Popular Culture Association’s Peter C. Rollins Book Award (2012) Winner of the ASCAP Deems Taylor Award (2012) Listening and Longing explores the emergence of music listening in the United States, from its early stages in the antebellum era, when entrepreneurs first packaged and sold the experience of hearing musical performance, to the Gilded Age, when genteel critics began to successfully redefine the cultural value of listening to music. In a series of interconnected stories, American studies scholar Daniel Cavicchi focuses on the impact of industrialization, urbanization, and commercialization in shaping practices of music audiences in America. Grounding our contemporary culture of listening in its seminal historical moment—before the iPod, stereo system, or phonograph—Cavicchi offers a fresh understanding of the role of listening in the history of music.
This book surveys the role of music in British culture throughout the long Romantic period.
The bestselling WORLDS OF MUSIC, now in its fifth edition, provides authoritative, accessible coverage of the world's music cultures. Based on the authors' fieldwork and expertise, this text presents in-depth explorations of several music cultures from around the world, with new chapters on China, Eastern Europe and the Arab world. The student-friendly, case-study approach and music-culture focus gives students a true sense of both the music and the culture that created it. Additionally, a high-quality 4-CD set (packaged with the book or purchased separately) contains a variety of recordings from multiple sources, including the authors' own fieldwork, other ethnomusicologists' field research, and commercial releases. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
Have records, compact discs, and other sound reproduction equipment merely provided American listeners with pleasant diversions, or have more important historical and cultural influences flowed through them? Do recording machines simply capture what's already out there, or is the music somehow transformed in the dual process of documentation and dissemination? How would our lives be different without these machines? Such are the questions that arise when we stop taking for granted the phenomenon of recorded music and the phonograph itself. Now comes an in-depth cultural history of the phonograph in the United States from 1890 to 1945. William Howland Kenney offers a full account of what he calls "the 78 r.p.m. era"--from the formative early decades in which the giants of the record industry reigned supreme in the absence of radio, to the postwar proliferation of independent labels, disk jockeys, and changes in popular taste and opinion. By examining the interplay between recorded music and the key social, political, and economic forces in America during the phonograph's rise and fall as the dominant medium of popular recorded sound, he addresses such vital issues as the place of multiculturalism in the phonograph's history, the roles of women as record-player listeners and performers, the belated commercial legitimacy of rhythm-and-blues recordings, the "hit record" phenomenon in the wake of the Great Depression, the origins of the rock-and-roll revolution, and the shifting place of popular recorded music in America's personal and cultural memories. Throughout the book, Kenney argues that the phonograph and the recording industry served neither to impose a preference for high culture nor a degraded popular taste, but rather expressed a diverse set of sensibilities in which various sorts of people found a new kind of pleasure. To this end, Recorded Music in American Life effectively illustrates how recorded music provided the focus for active recorded sound cultures, in which listeners shared what they heard, and expressed crucial dimensions of their private lives, by way of their involvement with records and record-players. Students and scholars of American music, culture, commerce, and history--as well as fans and collectors interested in this phase of our rich artistic past--will find a great deal of thorough research and fresh scholarship to enjoy in these pages.
This book surveys emerging music and education landscapes to present a sampling of the promising practices of music teacher education that may serve as new models for the 21st century. Contributors explore the delicate balance between curriculum and pedagogy, the power structures that influence music education at all levels, the role of contemporary musical practices in teacher education, and the communication challenges that surround institutional change. Models of programs that feature in-school, out-of-school and beyond school contexts, lifespan learning perspectives, active juxtapositions of formal and informal approaches to teaching and learning, student-driven project-based fieldwork, and the purposeful employment of technology and digital media as platforms for authentic music engagement within a contemporary participatory culture are all offered as springboards for innovative practice.
The book examines the ways in which music is used to advance identity claims in several Latin American countries and among Latinos in the U.S. Individual chapters address the ways in which music provides people with both enjoyment and the tools they use to understand who they are in terms of nationality, region, race, ethnicity, class, gender, and migration status."
This book examines the ways in which Cuba's revolutions of 1933 and 1959 became touchstones for border-crossing endeavors of radical politics and cultural experimentation over the mid-twentieth century. It argues that new networks of solidarity building between US and Cuban allies also brought with them perils and pitfalls that could not be separated from the longer history of US empire in Cuba. As US and Cuban subjects struggled together towards common aspirations of racial and gender equality, fairer distribution of wealth, and anti-imperialism, they created a unique index of cultural work that widens our understanding of the transition between hemispheric modernism and postmodernism. Canvassing poetry, music, journalism, photographs, and other cultural expressions around themes of revolution, this book seeks new understanding of how race, gender, and nationhood could shift in meaning and materialization when traveling across the Florida Straits.
First Published in 1998. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Editors and scholars Kanellos (University of Houston) and Fabregat (University of Barcelona) have assembled a team of outstanding scholars to compile comprehensive studies on all aspects of U.S. Hispanic culture.
Focus: Music of South Africa provides an in-depth look at the full spectrum of South African music, a musical culture that epitomizes the enormous ethnic, religious, linguistic, class, and gender diversity of the nation itself. Drawing on extensive field and archival research, as well as her own personal experiences, noted ethnomusicologist and South African native Carol A. Muller looks at how South Africans have used music to express a sense of place in South Africa, on the African continent, and around the world. Part One, Creating Connections, provides introductory materials for the study of South African Music. Part Two, Musical Migrations, moves to a more focused overview of significant musical styles in twentieth-century South Africa -- particularly those known through world circuits. Part Three, Focusing In, takes the reader into the heart of two musical cultures with case studies on South African jazz and the music of the Zulu-language followers of Isaiah Shembe. The accompanying CD offers vivid examples of traditional, popular, and classical South African musical styles.
The lives and aspirations of young Chinese (those between 14 and 26 years old) have been transformed in the past five decades. By examining youth cultures around three historical points - 1968, 1988 and 2008 - this book argues that present-day youth culture in China has both international and local roots. Paul Clark describes how the Red Guards and the sent-down youth of the Cultural Revolution era carved out a space for themselves, asserting their distinctive identities, despite tight political controls. By the late 1980s, Chinese-style rock music, sports and other recreations began to influence the identities of Chinese youth, and in the twenty-first century, the Internet offers a new, broader space for expressing youthful fandom and frustrations. From the 1960s to the present, this book shows how youth culture has been reworked to serve the needs of the young Chinese.
Provides a look at the wide spectrum of South African music, a musical culture that epitomizes the enormous ethnic, religious, linguistic, class, and gender diversity of the nation itself. This title looks at how South Africans have used music to express a sense of place in South Africa, on the African continent, and around the world.

Best Books