When you were a kid, what were some of the things you dreamed of being when you grew up? What's something you wish you had asked your parents, but never did? These and other thoughtful questions will get Mom talking. One thing's for sure - doing the interview will help make wonderful new memories, along with a volume that will be prized for generations to come.
"There's no news like hearing irrefutable proof that you're not the sole cause of your parents' woes, your father's drinking, your unshakable feeling that you're not put together quite right and finding out the problem all along was your father's unrequited yearning for angora." —Noelle Howey from Dress Codes Throughout her childhood in suburban Ohio, Noelle struggled to gain love and affection from her distant father. In compensating for her father's brusqueness, Noelle idolized her nurturing tomboy mother and her conservative grandma who tried to turn her into "a little lady." At age 14, Noelle's mom told her the family secret straight out: "Dad likes to wear women's clothes." As Noelle copes with a turbulent adolescence, further confused by the male and female role models she had as a girl, her father begins to metamorphose into the loving parent she had always longed for—only now outfitted in pedal pushers and pink lipstick. Could becoming a woman make her father a completely different person? With edgy humor, courage, and remarkable sensitivity, Noelle Howey challenges all of our beliefs in what constitutes gender and a "normal" family.
Excerpt from My Father and My Mother University of Chicago for permission to use the quota tions, numbered in the text, taken from Dr. Thomas W. Goodspeed's admirable boo/c: The University of Chicago Biographical Sketches Volume I. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
(Amadeus). Drawing on the personal recollections of the Caruso brothers, archival material preserved by the family, and extensive research, this book is a rare tribute to to the man and his vocal legacy. This abridged edition includes the full original text covering Caruso's life and death, plus a current discography.
With warmth, lucidity and good humour, Pagnol, a boy from the city, recounts the glorious summer days he spent exploring the sun-baked Provençal countryside. He vividly captures the atmosphere of a childhood filled with the simple pleasures: a meal, a joke, an outing shared with his close-knit and loving family. These heart-warming stories remind us of how children can invest the smallest event or statement with incredible significance, how mysterious the workings of the adult world can seem to them and how painful the learning process can often prove. However, Pagnol’s writing is filled with enormous optimism and delight. And his triumph in these classic memoirs is to have created that rare thing, a work suffused with joy. ‘Pagnol’s place in the history of French culture is secure. The Prousts and Sartres may be admired, but Pagnol is loved’ Times Literary Supplement
CHILDREN'S BOOKS/AGES 4-8
The loss of a parent is an experience that we all face without any training - relating to a parent through old age and illness; going through the actual death in different circumstances and whether we can help parents to have a good death; the emotional aftermath - shock, grief, relief, the effect on families; funerals, wills and other rituals; clearing out the house and keeping memories alive; recovery and carrying on with life; the longer-term changes in us and our relationship with our parents. Edited by Sydney Morning Herald literary editor, journalist and writer Susan Wyndham, My Mother, My Fatheris a collection of stories from 14 remarkable Australian writers, sharing what it is to feel loss, and all the experiences and memories that create the image of our parents. Contributors include Helen Garner, David Marr, Tom Keneally, Gerard Windsor, Susan Duncan and Caroline Baum. These stories are intimate, honest, moving, sometimes funny, never sentimental, and always well written.
In the spring of 1986, Sue Miller found herself more and more deeply involved in caring for her father as he slipped into the grasp of Alzheimer's disease. The Story of My Father is a profound, deeply moving account of her father's final days and her own response to it. With care, restraint and consummate skill, Miller writes of her struggles to be fully with her father in his illness while confronting her own terror of abandonment, and eventually the long, hard work of grieving for him. And through this candid, painful record, she offers a rigorous, compassionate inventory of two lives, a powerful meditation on the variable nature of memory and the difficulty of weaving a truthful narrative from the threads of a dissolving life. This is a truly remarkable book from one of America's best loved authors.
MY FATHER AND MY TWO LOVES is a love story about the American dream of success of a young Chilean/ North American psychologist, Victoria Wellington, who thinks her life is perfect in the U.S, but when her father dies in Chile, her world collapses with grief and desperation. She returns to Chile and joins her family in grief. Amidst the grief, unexpectedly, Pierre, a journalist, seduces Victoria and she thinks that he is her ideal man. However, after some time that love fades away when she falls in love with Edward, one of Pierre’s best friends. A love triangle leads Victoria to an unimaginable tragedy and to understand the psychology and meaning of true love. The novel represents the human condition from which we cannot escape such as love, death, and hope. Inspired by the psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud, Roche uses dreams to express unconscious wishes in which she tries to revive, recreate, and remember her father.
When his father died, J. R. Ackerley was shocked to discover that he had led a secret life. And after Ackerley himself died, he left a surprise of his own—this coolly considered, unsparingly honest account of his quest to find out the whole truth about the man who had always eluded him in life. But Ackerley’s pursuit of his father is also an exploration of the self, making My Father and Myself a pioneering record, at once sexually explicit and emotionally charged, of life as a gay man. This witty, sorrowful, and beautiful book is a classic of twentieth-century memoir.
A psychoanalyst reinterprets the dynamics of the family to examine the ways in which fathers and sons influence each other, critically assessing the changing father/son relationship throughout the life cycle in a study designed to help make sense of the question of what it really means to be a man.
A series of prose poems describes the author's life while she was growing up in Houston, Texas, from her eleventh birthday in 1965 through her eighteenth in 1972, and beyond, communicating the disappointment and the delight of growing up in a loving, imperfect family. 15,000 first printing.
With is father near death and his mind swirling with stilted and unresolved memories of him, Billionaire, James Phalen, is forced to confront the truth about his childhood, and about how he views his father. At forty-one years of age, he realizes that what matters most are the memories, or lack of memories. He lures us into his life?into his world, where his billions and his successes are not enough to guide him through the pain and conflict. James Phalen stands at a crossroads, facing a decision that will change his life. Time is running out.
When Alice Ozma was in 4th grade, she and her father decided to see if he could read aloud to her for 100 consecutive nights. On the hundreth night, they shared pancakes to celebrate, but it soon became evident that neither wanted to let go of their storytelling ritual. So they decided to continue what they called "The Streak." Alice's father read aloud to her every night without fail until the day she left for college. Alice approaches her book as a series of vignettes about her relationship with her father and the life lessons learned from the books he read to her. Books included in the Streak were: Great Expectations by Charles Dickens, the Oz books by L. Frank Baum, Harry Potter by J. K. Rowling, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll, and Shakespeare's plays.
'Exquisitely written and wonderfully readable - There are tears, laughter and filial tenderness on every page of Tim Jeal's perfect gem of a book.' Val Hennessy, Daily Mail An exquisite and moving portrait of a deeply eccentric father. Tim Jeal's beautifully nuanced memoir is by turns lyrical, poignant and gloriously funny. 'Jeal's prose is so sprightly, his interweaving of time-schemes so skilful, and his 'ordinary' story so touching that his book feels completely fresh - At its heart is an unusually engrossing account of parental oddity, marital resilience and filial complexity.' Andrew Motion, Guardian 'This is a marvellous book: funny, vivid, immensely touching and beautifully constructed.' John Preston, Evening Standard 'A pleasure to read: unpretentious, moving, full of jokes but also unobtrusively wise.' Anne Chisholm, Sunday Telegraph

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