The loss of a parent is an experience that we all face without any training - relating to a parent through old age and illness; going through the actual death in different circumstances and whether we can help parents to have a good death; the emotional aftermath - shock, grief, relief, the effect on families; funerals, wills and other rituals; clearing out the house and keeping memories alive; recovery and carrying on with life; the longer-term changes in us and our relationship with our parents. Edited by Sydney Morning Herald literary editor, journalist and writer Susan Wyndham, My Mother, My Fatheris a collection of stories from 14 remarkable Australian writers, sharing what it is to feel loss, and all the experiences and memories that create the image of our parents. Contributors include Helen Garner, David Marr, Tom Keneally, Gerard Windsor, Susan Duncan and Caroline Baum. These stories are intimate, honest, moving, sometimes funny, never sentimental, and always well written.
I start the story on Christmas in the year 2004 and finished it in October 2005. The reason it took me this long even when I have all the story in my mind is my time was very short to sit at the computer and type. It is about an innocent man looking for a job and he ends up in a trap. They hired him to kill, but the plan was killing the President, so he did what he was hired for, but inside the jail was a shocking surprise. I hope you like the story.
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An intense, refractory memoir by a major poet Misgivings is C. K. Williams's searing recollection of his family's extreme dynamics and of his parents' deaths after years of struggle, bitterness, and inner conflict. Like Kafka's self-revealing Letter to His Father, Misgivings is full of doubt, both philosophical and personal, but as a work of art it is sure and true. Williams's father was an "ordinary businessman"--angry, demanding, addicted to the tension he created with the people he loved; a man who could read the Greek myths aloud to his son yet vowed never to apologize to anybody. His mother was a housewife, a woman with a great capacity for pleasure, who was stoical about the family's dire early poverty yet remained affected by it even when they became well-off. Together, these two formed what Williams calls the "conspiracy that made me who I am." His account of their life together and their deaths--his father's with suicidal despair, and his mother's with calm resignation--is a literary form of the reconciliation the family achieved at the end of his parents' lives. And as literary form it is novel, a series of brilliant short takes, a double helix of experience and recollection. Few contemporary writers have understood their origins so acutely, or so eloquently.
To the Navajo, sandpaintings are sacred, living entities that reflect the interconnectedness of all living beings--humans, plants, stars, animals, and mountains. This book, now available in paperback, explores the circularity of Navajo thought in sandpaintings, Navajo chantway myths, and stories reflected in the celestial constellations. Beautifully illustrated by the author, this well-documented book explores the spiritual world of the Navajo, their ceremonial practices, and their conceptions of time and stellar motion. Griffin-Pierce shows how the images of sacred sandpaintings not only communicate the temporal and spatial dimensions of the Navajo universe but also present, in visual form, Navajo ideas about relationships among nature, self, and society. "Griffin-Pierce's approach is highly original, bringing this material together in an innovative and creative manner while grounding it holistically within the context of Navajo world view."--M. Jane Young, author ofSigns from the Ancestors: Zuni Cultural Symbolism and Perceptions of Rock Art
"There's no news like hearing irrefutable proof that you're not the sole cause of your parents' woes, your father's drinking, your unshakable feeling that you're not put together quite right and finding out the problem all along was your father's unrequited yearning for angora." —Noelle Howey from Dress Codes Throughout her childhood in suburban Ohio, Noelle struggled to gain love and affection from her distant father. In compensating for her father's brusqueness, Noelle idolized her nurturing tomboy mother and her conservative grandma who tried to turn her into "a little lady." At age 14, Noelle's mom told her the family secret straight out: "Dad likes to wear women's clothes." As Noelle copes with a turbulent adolescence, further confused by the male and female role models she had as a girl, her father begins to metamorphose into the loving parent she had always longed for—only now outfitted in pedal pushers and pink lipstick. Could becoming a woman make her father a completely different person? With edgy humor, courage, and remarkable sensitivity, Noelle Howey challenges all of our beliefs in what constitutes gender and a "normal" family.
Eleven-year-old Cynthia and her six-year-old sister try to adjust to their parents' separation and divorce.
CHILDREN'S BOOKS/AGES 4-8
Elva Aggiano was murdered in 1997 by her husband Bruno. Of the four Aggiano children, three vowed never to speak to their father again. Remarkably, their daughter Natalia renewed her relationship with Bruno and became his friend and companion until his death in 2066. This is her astonishing story.Kind and loyal, Elva was a bright young woman from a typical English seaside town who was swept off her feet by an older , handsome Italian bodybuilder. It was all she had ever wanted; the promise of life as a loving mother and devoted wife. But a dark secret from her past left vulnerable to Bruno's brooding, possessive nature, and behind closed doors, Elva's family idyll turned into a reign of terror of both mental and physical abuse for her and her children.Their daughter Natalia speaks for the first time about how the family suffered, about her escape onto the streets aged 17 and her traumatic struggle to survive alone. Natalia finally persuaded Elva to run away along with her youngest son and for the first time, Elva found the happiness and confidence that had always eluded her. But it was not to last. Giving way to Bruno's request to see his young son, Elva returned to the marital home, where Bruno mercilessly stabbed her to death.Against all odds, Natalia found the courage to stand by her father even after he'd ripped the family apart. During often harrowing visits to Rampton high-security psychiatric hospital, she learned to love Bruno for the first time. Her fascinating journey led Natalia to honour her mother's memory, finding a way to live forgiveness and unconditional love.'Amazing' - Peter Andre'An extraordinary young woman and so selfless' - Carol Vorderman
'It was six long years before I alerted the authorities to what had happened. During that time, I lived each day in fear of my mother, and of what would happen if I told. I became a shadow of my former self...my mental health suffered so badly that I even lost my own children. The day I told the truth was the second most frightening day of my life. But I did it. This is my story.' Witness to Evil tells the story of how an innocent young girl had her life turned upside down by a tyrannical and abusive mother, who planned and executed the murder of her husband without emotion and with no regrets. Here Veronica McGrath speaks out for the first time about growing up in the home run under the strict control of Vera McGrath, and about the horrendous night when she witnessed the brutal killing of her father by her mother and her own fianc Colin Pinder. She tells of how her mother made her swear never to reveal the dark family secret, threatening to sign her into a psychiatric unit if she even thought of alerting the police. Veronica also describes her life with her beloved dad, Bernard, whose loss in her life was the end of the only stability she knew. And she gives a detailed account of the court case in 2010, where she was chief prosecution witness, that led to her mother being sentenced to life imprisonment for murder, and her former partner being convicted of manslaughter. Witness to Evil is Veronica's brave account of a fraught yet extraordinary personal journey and a hard-won fight to win justice for her father.
The fairy tale lives again in this book of forty new stories by some of the biggest names in contemporary fiction. Neil Gaiman, “Orange” Aimee Bender, “The Color Master” Joyce Carol Oates, “Blue-bearded Lover” Michael Cunningham, “The Wild Swans” These and more than thirty other stories by Francine Prose, Kelly Link, Jim Shepard, Lydia Millet, and many other extraordinary writers make up this thrilling celebration of fairy tales—the ultimate literary costume party. Spinning houses and talking birds. Whispered secrets and borrowed hope. Here are new stories sewn from old skins, gathered by visionary editor Kate Bernheimer and inspired by everything from Hans Christian Andersen’s “The Snow Queen” and “The Little Match Girl” to Charles Perrault’s “Bluebeard” and “Cinderella” to the Brothers Grimm’s “Hansel and Gretel” and “Rumpelstiltskin” to fairy tales by Goethe and Calvino and from China, Japan, Vietnam, Russia, Norway, and Mexico. Fairy tales are our oldest literary tradition, and yet they chart the imaginative frontiers of the twenty-first century as powerfully as they evoke our earliest encounters with literature. This exhilarating collection restores their place in the literary canon.
P.J. Fisk has mothered six children and now grandmothers twelve. She raised her daughters within the context of a fundamental Christian church, based in the patriarchal systems of Bible and religion. Paula has been an avid student on the topic of women and religion for over thirty years. She has pursued research into the history of ancient religions up to current times in an effort to understand the plight of the female in a predominant male system of religion. Her personal stories are candid and relevant for women today in the 21st century. She speaks wisely about the gift that is female, and correlates profoundly the evolution of religious beliefs to the evolution of women within historical societies. Paula lives in Colorado with her husband, Loren, at the foothills of the beautiful Rocky Mountains. If God is My Father, Who is My Mother? is a spiritual journey out of the depths of conservative patriarchy to the enlightenment of a Mother/Father God. Paula takes care to tell a story of family and church secrets without condemnation or blame. She traveled this journey with many other sisters searching for truth and fulfillment in lives bound by age-old traditions of religious thought. Misogyny found in her home, church, and the schools she served, caused questioning that she could not satisfy. Her story is about the education and guidance of female students at both the high school and college levels. It was during these tenures that Paula began to recognize the conditioning of females by a patriarchal society. She dedicated herself first to healing, and then to discovery and enlightenment. Paula knows first-hand how research produces more questions, which lead to more study. Journey with her through this memoir of revelations, questions, and proposed answers.
Acclaimed 60 Minutes commentator and true-crime author Shana Alexander turns her journalist’s eye to her own unconventional family—and herself—in this fascinating, moving memoir Shana Alexander spent most of her life trying to figure out her enigmatic parents. Milton Ager was a famous songwriter whose creations included “Ain’t She Sweet” and “Happy Days Are Here Again.” Cecelia Ager was a film critic and Variety columnist. They were a glamorous Jazz Age couple that moved in charmed circles with George and Ira Gershwin, Dorothy Parker, and Jerome Kern. They remained together for fifty-seven years, and yet they lived separate lives. This wise, witty, unflinchingly candid memoir is also a revealing account of Alexander’s own life, from her successful career as a writer and national-news commentator to her troubled marriages and emotionally wrenching love affairs. She shares insights about growing up with a cold, hypercritical mother, her relationship with her younger sister, the suicide of her adopted daughter, and her reconciliation with her parents after a twenty-year estrangement. “I had to do a lot of detective work to uncover the truth about my parents’ lives,” Alexander said. “I knew almost nothing about them as people. But by the end they really did become my best friends.”
Dramatizes the lives, problems, and failings of the people of a small New England town
This study brings together three closely related aspects of Maori literature - myth, memory and identity. It examines selected novels by Witi Ihimaera and Patricia Grace in order to trace an ever-developing Maori identity that has changed considerably over three decades of the Maori novel. This book demonstrates that an investigation of the construction of identity in literature benefits from a close look at the importance of Maori mythology as well as associated cultural and individual memories. Indicating that Maori fiction has become what Homi Bhabha terms a third space, this book verifies the links between novel, myth and memory with the help of existing research in these areas in order to assess their importance for the reinterpretation of identity. The Maori novels that depict situations reflecting current issues are viewed as an experimental playground in which authors can explore a variety of solutions to tribal, societal and political issues. This study establishes the early novels as reinterpretations of the past and guides to the future, and characterises the more recent novels as representing a move towards empowerment and pioneering that has not yet come to a conclusion.
In narrative form, this book chronicles the five-year journey the author took with her father, afflicted with Alzheimers, to restore his dignity and help him reach his physical, mental, and spiritual potential. It presents the many obstacles, including the presence of evil forces and other family members mental disorders, which had to be overcome to accomplish this. The book illustrates how the common denominator of faith in God and a belief in His supreme will enabled communication with her father, with whom she previously had only limited interaction. She came to discover the importance of entering her fathers world, of confirming his reality, and to recognize though parts of the brain may be tangled and even gone, the response to spirit and tone actually remains. Her fathers sensory awareness and understanding increased, and she challenges some previous stereotypes held about patients with this disease. Pragmatically, the author gives the caregiver suggestions on how to ensure the patients sense of accomplishment and purpose and maps out daily activity processes. The book illustrates how previous experiences enabled them to survive their storm, as the author relentlessly struggled to keep her father from being institutionalized so he could remain a participant in this world. Occasionally, in a mans life, there is a book or manuscript that comes his way that is so far out of the norm and so deep beyond expectation that it requires thought, prayer, and time to assimilate the information through meditation. Theres a Storm Coming, Kathryn Huddlestons book on the subject of her fathers experience with Alzheimers disease and her passion to help him be the very best he could be physically, mentally and spiritually, is incredible. The journey with glimpses into the family life through the eyes of a person with medical insight, and ultimately, through a spiritual lens, allows us to take a peek behind the veil of one of the most difficult and tough situations facing many Americans today. This book is an incredible read for those who care about the condition of their fellow human beings. Maury Davis, Senior Pastor, Cornerstone Church, Nashville, TN Maury Davis Ministries God brings hope to us in stormy times. Through these dark years, compassion and care for loved ones is always first. This could not be more true than in this book. Michelle Stein, Executive Director, Alzheimers Solutions Project Center for Health Transformation, Washington, D.C. The author captures the readers attention by recounting in narrative form how she attempted to overcome the many challenges and trials in her stormy family in order to lessen her fathers turbulence and bring him peace in the last phase of his life. In an unassuming, authentic way, the author illustrates how she ensured her father remained a valued participant in the world. Giving caregivers concrete ideas on how she helped her father make decisions, ensured up-close and personal interaction with others, and recognized the importance of tone, spirit, and listening, the book should give them a sense of hope. E.L. Shoenfelt, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology, Western Kentucky University, Performance Psychologist Kathryn Huddleston believes that while in the midst of other life storms God gave her the gift to care for her father. Here she shares that journey in a very personal, detailed, and honest fashion. Not only is this a wonderful handbook for the Alzheimers caregiver, Kathryns story affirms my experience of Gods daily walk with those who appear to be absent. While we may see our loved ones as fading way, in reality, they may be living the old gospel hymn, Just a Closer Walk with Thee. This book gives the caregiver, or any reader, great spiritual hope. Chaplain R. Gene Lovelace, Alive Hospice, Nashville, TN

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