Black Cultural Traffic traces how blackness travels globally in performance, engaging the work of an international and interdisciplinary mix of scholars, critics, and practicing artists.
The book is considered fiction, although it is based on the lives of the author's ancestors. Five year-old Emily (Bay-Chile), growing up in rural central Georgia in 1940, becomes curious about color differences within her family and questions her talkative great-aunt and grand-parents. Through numerous inquiries, she learns that her great-grandfather, Josh Ellis, fought with the Confederate Army in the Civil War while her great-grandmother, Charity was a slave. The two met after the Emancipation of the slaves and lived in a loving relationship until his death, raising seven children together. Further explorations connect the child to the lives of Charity's mother, Ansacka, a mulatto slave woman who conceived Charity through a forced relationship with the slave master; another great-grandmother, Martha, whose parents escaped into the mountains of Georgia to avoid the forced march of the Cherokee from Georgia to Mississippi, becomes enthralled by Troupe Allen, a white man who deserts her just before the birth of their son. Great-great-grandma Judy, among the last of the slaves imported from Africa tells her story .The progress of the descendants, spanning five generations, is traced following the Reconstruction Period through World War II, with some notable achievements. Broader issues include white/black kinship ties in the antebellum and post-bellum South, race relations, intra-racial color conflict, and blended families. Historical events occurring during the lifetimes of the author's various ancestors are superbly blended within the story. The story illustrates the devastating effects of racism on the human spirit as well as the ability to press onward despite adversity.
Neil Gaiman's award-winning novells The Truth is a Cave in the Black Mountains is a haunting story of family, the otherworld, and a search for hidden treasure, and was serialised on BBC Radio 4's Book at Bedtime in November 2015. 'Gaiman's achievement is to make the fantasy world seem true' (The Times). Neil Gaiman is the bestselling author of The Ocean at the End of the Lane and the epic American Gods, whose storytelling genius will appeal to fans of J.K. Rowling and George R.R. Martin. The text of The Truth Is a Cave in the Black Mountains was first published in the collection Stories: All New Tales (Headline, 2010). This gorgeous full-colour illustrated book version was born of a unique collaboration between writer Neil Gaiman and artist Eddie Campbell, who brought to vivid life the characters and landscape of Gaiman's story. In August 2010, The Truth is a Cave in the Black Mountains was performed in the concert hall of the Sydney Opera House to a sell-out crowd - Gaiman read his tale live as Campbell's magnificent artwork was presented, scene by scene, on large screens. Narrative and art were accompanied by live music composed and performed especially for the story by the FourPlay String Quartet.
Destiny takes a detour in this “wickedly witty and offbeat novel” (Kirkus Reviews, starred review) that was nominated for the National Book Award. Finn Easton sees the world through miles instead of minutes. It’s how he makes sense of the world, and how he tries to convince himself that he’s a real boy and not just a character in his father’s bestselling cult-classic book. Finn has two things going for him: his best friend, the possibly-insane-but-definitely-excellent Cade Hernandez, and Julia Bishop, the first girl he’s ever loved. Then Julia moves away, and Finn is heartbroken. Feeling restless and trapped in the book, Finn embarks on a road trip with Cade to visit their college of choice in Oklahoma. When an unexpected accident happens and the boys become unlikely heroes, they take an eye-opening detour away from everything they thought they had planned—and learn how to write their own destiny. NYTBR Notable Children’s Book of the Year NPR Best Book of the Year NYPL’s Best Book of the Year for Teens ALA Best Fiction for Young Adults Chicago Public Library Best Teen Fiction of the Year A Texas Tayshas Top Ten Selection
Based on data gathered through hour-long interviews conducted by the author, explores the similarities and differences of obstacles faced by twenty women, born and raised in inner city environments, in their path to becoming college students.
Giving honor to the man whose ahead of my life, it wasnt for the strength I got from him and just believing in myself. I wouldnt be able to start this book about my life. I was inspire to turn my journal into a book of events that happen in my life. Ive made mistakes in my life, where I was able to learn from them. I have to give all thanks and praise to the almighty God himself for giving me the opportunity to write this book. Everyone has a story behind us that will inspire the next person to have an abundant life. This is my life story and the only thing is fiction are the names because I had to be creative. Hope you enjoy it. When you read it, remember dont point fingers because only God can judge me. You have to walk a mile in my shoes in order to be where I am and going. Be encourage in one mind to know we learn from everyone and everything has a purpose as well as a reason. And special recognition to these following people because of you played a very important role in my life an in this book. Antonia Allison, Tanye Overton, Monica Morris-Triplett, Tiffany Oliver, Jason McDaniel, Andrea Carthan, Lashana Baker-Tilson, and Shamieka Matthews-Dean. Thank you for keeping me on my toes and letting me know that I can do anything with God being first. Inspire not to settle for nothing by the best.
Common stereotypes portray black fathers as being largely absent from their families. Yet while black fathers are less likely than white and Hispanic fathers to marry their child's mother, many continue to parent through cohabitation and visitation, providing caretaking, financial, and other in-kind support. This volume captures the meaning and practice of black fatherhood in its many manifestations, exploring two-parent families, cohabitation, single custodial fathering, stepfathering, noncustodial visitation, and parenting by extended family members and friends. Contributors examine ways that black men perceive and decipher their parenting responsibilities, paying careful attention to psychosocial, economic, and political factors that affect the ability to parent. Chapters compare the diversity of African American fatherhood with negative portrayals in politics, academia, and literature and, through qualitative analysis and original profiles, illustrate the struggle and intent of many black fathers to be responsible caregivers. This collection also includes interviews with daughters of absent fathers and concludes with the effects of certain policy decisions on responsible parenting.
(Applause Books). Warning: The plays of Political Stages do not make for a quiet evening of theatre. These are the plays which got audiences out of their seats, and sometimes out into the streets. Their words and ideas rumbled ominously down the marble hallways of legislatures and challenged, even threatened, and often changed, the thinking of millions. These are the plays which either lit or reflected the fires of those political controversies which blazed across the American Twentieth Century. Individually, each is a molotov cocktail tossed onto the stage, each a political movement encapsulated in dramatic form. Combined, they constitute both a conflagration and a record of American political and theatrical ideology. Never before, however, have they been collected in one explosive volume. In Political Stages , they have at last been preserved, ever ready to serve at the barricades of subsequent eras. Includes works by Tennessee Williams, Emily Mann, Clifford Odets, Langston Hughes, and others.
Run and Tell That is a book of short stories that is breathtaking and heart pounding. You won’t be able to put it down. Some stories may cause you to get angry, or even cause you to have hope again; hold on to your seats. Stay still—inhale, exhale. One thing is for sure; many people will be able to relate to one of these stories, be it good or bad. The main thing is, don’t take offense; think about it, and twirl it around in your head. Think about the secrets that someone you know has shared with you, the stories you heard from friends and family, and things that have happened to some of them. Believe it or not, one of these stories just may be yours, and if it is, don’t worry, I got you! I will tell it just like it is! Maybe this may cause the abuser to stop the abuse, or the liars to stop lying. There are men and women out there that have so much dirt in their backyards that you can’t see the grass. To the mothers and fathers, pay close attention to your kids. To husbands and wives, stop lying to each other; it is what is. Communicate, and don’t be afraid of what he or she may say. Knowing is a beginning of moving forward toward dealing with whatever situations you face. Grow up people; you have the right to choose how you want to live your life. It’s all about choices! Let’s learn how to stop spinning our wheels, and know life goes on; you win some and lose some. Life has never been fair, and don’t go around thinking that is it. Just be true to yourself and your good. In this world, we have freedom of speech, freedom of choice, and the right to be happy.
This collection of profiles, interviews, essays and reviews on such well-known writers as Ken Burns, Dionne Brand, Austin Clarke and Edwidge Danticat constitutes a frank conversation on the significance of race in the work of contemporary Black artists.
In everyday language, masochism is usually understood as the desire to abdicate control in exchange for sensation—pleasure, pain, or a combination thereof. Yet at its core, masochism is a site where power, bodies, and society come together. Sensational Flesh uses masochism as a lens to examine how power structures race, gender, and embodiment in different contexts. Drawing on rich and varied sources—from 19th century sexology, psychoanalysis, and critical theory to literary texts and performance art—Amber Jamilla Musser employs masochism as a powerful diagnostic tool for probing relationships between power and subjectivity. Engaging with a range of debates about lesbian S&M, racialization, femininity, and disability, as well as key texts such as Sacher-Masoch’s Venus in Furs, Pauline Réage’s The Story of O, and Michel Foucault's History of Sexuality, Musser renders legible the complex ways that masochism has been taken up by queer, feminist, and critical race theories. Furthering queer theory’s investment in affect and materiality, she proposes “sensation” as an analytical tool for illustrating what it feels like to be embedded in structures of domination such as patriarchy, colonialism, and racism and what it means to embody femininity, blackness, and pain. Sensational Flesh is ultimately about the ways in which difference is made material through race, gender, and sexuality and how that materiality is experienced.
The Life and Times of a Black Southern Doctor, or LATOBSD as it will be referred to from here on in this condensation, is a saga of life in the panhandle of Florida from 1896 to 1956 and a bit beyond. Doctor Alpha Omega Campbell was an actual practicing physician in and around Tallahassee between 1913 and 1956. In 1956, at the age of 67, A.O. Campbell was convicted of manslaughter in the death of a Jacksonville mother of two, after allegedly performing a criminal abortion that eventually results in her dying. On in years and eyeing semi-retirement, he is sent Floridas hardest prison for four of his remaining years. LATOBSD begins 1 years into the doctors incarceration at the time of his dear wifes funeral. Maggie Lou Campbell did not do well with her husband hundreds of miles away. She has been watching their empire of wealth and real estate crumble around her, spurred on by numerous jealous conspirators who position themselves like sharks around a school of hapless fish. It is from that point backward, I transport the reader back in time, before Maggie Lou was conceived by her multi-racial mother with the help of one of Leon Countys most respected grocers and back when Alfrey (A.O.) Campbells family was beholding to a deep-rooted plantation owner; some called it slavery in the post emancipation south. From this time forward, I undertake the task of fictionalizing a seemingly unmeasurable share of people and events. Most of this recounting of the doctors affairs is true to history, used as a guidepost for the seventy-some year story line. There are many people amongst the ensemble that closely resemble many of those that truly did exist, back when the delineation between black and white was beginning to show signs of gray. Yet as close as the Campbells pushed that line towards equality, a stronger force bludgeoned them back where they belonged. As tempting as it was to make this biographical, I could not. Case in point, the considerable liberty taken, especially as it applies to the more famous characters I have inserted in this moderately loosely-tied account of what really happened. If you think historical fiction is tough, staying true to events, multiply that by two and you have a biography; there will always be someone who says: That isnt the way it happened.. So as we traipse our way into the wonderful world of fiction. Consider this list of names and events (In order of their appearance): I. The Spanish-American War II. 25th President: William McKinley III. The Galveston Hurricane1900 IV. 26th President: Theodore Roosevelt V. George Eastman (sister Judith) VI. Suffragette: Emmeline Pankhurst VII. The San Francisco Earthquake1906 VIII. Playwright: Sir James Barrie IX. World War I X. Mary PickfordEarly Hollywood XI. The Pacific Clipper Flying BoatsPanAm XII. Roswell, New Mexico: Area 51 Whoowah Nellie. What does any of this have to do with a black Southern doctor you ask? That is what makes history fun, even if much of this stuff did not come down quite the way I write it. I promise to dedicate the 20th chapter to the process of sorting the beef from the bull; the inconsistencies you all will gladly point out while reading along as the decades peel away. The bottom line is that LATOBSD is not just about the doctor.
Black Market Black Market, with written material primarily created 2000 to mid-2003, is the forth book in a series by writer Sereena Nightshade (photographed on the cover of Black Market on June 2013). The three previous books in this particular series include the following: The Visage, House of Sorrows and Sweetie Baby. Black Market is the work of this series that describes the meat market/judged or deemed worthy of consideration due to physical appearance feel created by the primary co-character in Sweetie-Baby. In this reality no one could escape unscathed and no one did indeed. Readers are advised to read both Sweetie-Baby and Black Market for full clarity. It is advisable to review The Visage as well. Names of individuals in all of this authors books are fictitious names. Real names are not revealed. Review by Dominic.
1943 stellt das Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory der NACA,die später zur NASA wird, erstmalig afroamerikanische Frauen ein. "Menschliche Rechner" - unter ihnen Dorothy Vaughan, die 1953 Vorgesetzte der brillanten afroamerikanischen Mathematikerin Katherine Johnson wird. Trotz Diskriminierung und Vorurteilen, treiben sie die Forschungen der NASA voran und Katherine Johnsons Berechnungen werden maßgeblich für den Erfolg der Apollo-Missionen. Dies ist ihre Geschichte. "Mit dieser unglaublich mitreißenden und vielschichtigen Erzählung zeigt Shetterly ihr Können. Die Geschichte begeistert in allen Aspekten." Booklist
Born a slave in free territory, Joseph Godfrey died widely reviled for his controversial role in the U.S. Dakota War of 1862. Separated from his mother at age five when his master sold her, Joseph Godfrey was kept in bondage in Minnesota to serve the fur - trade elite. To escape his masters' beatings and abuse, he sought refuge in his teens among the Dakota people he'd befriended as a child slave. Godfrey married a Dakota woman and was living with his family on the Lower Sioux Reservation in 1862. Conscripted to don war paint and join Dakota warriors who killed defenseless settlers in the opening days of the U.S. - Dakota War of 1862, he became the first of hundreds of men tried by a military court when the six - week war ended in late September. Commander Henry Sibley, who created the court, was one of his former masters. Sibley approved death sentences for Godfrey and 302 other Dakota soldiers. In this riveting, first - ever biography of Joseph Godfrey, historian and retired lawyer Walt Bachman untangles the thorny questions that haunt Godfrey's story: How was he enslaved in a free state? Did he murder the frontier settlers for which the Dakota dubbed him Otakle - ''Many Kills''? Did he turn traitor to save his own skin? Did Godfrey's testimony send 38 Dakota men - including his father - in - law - to the gallows on the day after Christmas, 1862? In this carefully researched, stunning historical debut, Bachman argues that the 1862 war trials that ended with the largest mass execution in U.S. history, were both more just, and more unfair than we've ever guessed.
The rate of women entering prison has increased nearly 400 percent since 1980, with African American women constituting the largest percentage of this population. However, despite their extremely disproportional representation in correctional institutions, little attention has been paid to their experiences within the criminal justice system. Inner Lives provides readers the rare opportunity to intimately connect with African American women prisoners. By presenting the women's stories in their own voices, Paula C. Johnson captures the reality of those who are in the system, and those who are working to help them. Johnson offers a nuanced and compelling portrait of this fastest-growing prison population by blending legal history, ethnography, sociology, and criminology. These striking and vivid narratives are accompanied by equally compelling arguments by Johnson on how to reform our nation's laws and social policies, in order to eradicate existing inequalities. Her thorough and insightful analysis of the historical and legal background of contemporary criminal law doctrine, sentencing theories, and correctional policies sets the stage for understanding the current system.
This book traverses any age, gender, or race. Its a self-help book for anyone facing challenges. I wrote about my childhood memoirs. All children have challenges in life. In this book, I explained how I was reared as a child and my family unit. I explored my childhood experiences and the tool I used to overcome the difficult times. As an adult, I still utilize this tool. Also, I addressed problems that are plaguing the black American nation. Black America needs to deal with several issues within its community. Can we discuss these issues and find a resolution?
This book is a resource to help support, encourage, and inspire people of mixed race (and everyone) to embrace all of who they are, and not allow anyone to define them. Its purpose is to cultivate confidence, comfort, and inner peace in the reader across race, creed, color, or gender.

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