In this true tale, Molly, now a grandmother in her seventies, tells the story of her real-life experiences in the sex trade in a series of graphic and lurid flash-backs. As the tranquil world of this mature and seemingly well-balanced woman is suddenly shattered by unexpected outbursts of bizarre and debilitating behavior, Molly’s daughter, Carin, is totally bewildered by her mother's strange antics. Carin has always had a good relationship with her mother, but knows nothing of Molly’s past. Molly’s friends are equally confused, but little by little, her story becomes clear: how Molly became enamored of the sex trade and how that lifestyle was deeply ingrained in her personality. Her journey into darkness is long and arduous. Exposed to sex far too soon because of her mother’s poor influence and bad example, Molly grew up around sex workers who groomed her for “the life.” Patrons exploited and abused her. When her father returned from his service in World War II, she hoped that he would help her off the path she had taken—only to have her dreams shattered. Instead of protecting her, he took advantage of her youth and promiscuity for his own financial gain. Molly is forced to do the unthinkable to gain control of her life. Told from the perspective of a survivor looking back and recovering from her experiences, In My Father’s House offers a unique and heartrending view of a girl growing up in the shadows of the sex trade.
Matthew Carr embarks, literally, on a journey in search of his father. His book combines the skills of a gifted travel writer, a novelist and a biographer. The result is a high-class creation that unfolds with the excitement of a detective story.' Richard Gott, The Independent
In this vastly important, widely-acclaimed volume, Appiah, a Ghanaian philosopher who now teaches at Harvard, explores what it means to be an African American, on the many preconceptions that have muddled discussions of face, Africa, and Afrocentrism since the end of the 19th century. A New York Times Notable Book of the Year.
This book is about a father and a son. But it is more than that. It is about family life as many Americans remember it. It is about a child's world and finally having to leave it. With love.
The life stories of three women--Kate, a professor's wife; Mary, a dancer; and Rita, a sculptor--provide clear examples of the individuation process of women in a patriarchal society.
Beloved storyteller Belva Plain understands the rich tapestry of the human heart like no other. Her many dazzling New York Times bestsellers probe the shifting bonds of marriage and family with insight, compassion, and uncommon grace. And her new novel is no exception. A tale of fathers and daughters, lovers and families, acts of love and acts of betrayal, Her Father’s House is Belva Plain’s most powerful and unforgettable novel yet. It is the spring of 1968 when Donald Wolfe, a young graduate of a midwestern law school, arrives in New York. Filled with ambition and idealism, he is dazzled not only by the big city but by the vivacious, restless Lillian, whom he marries in the heat of infatuation. Surely theirs is no marriage made in heaven, but they have a child, Tina, and she is the love of Donald’s heart. For her he would give up everything--his home, his distinguished career, and his freedom. When his flawed marriage begins to fail, a choice must be made. Shall he consider a step that would force him into flight and a life of hiding? From her earliest years, Tina is exceptional, a brilliant student and a joyous, loving spirit. At the university she falls in love with Gilbert, who graduates from law school just as she is about to enter medical school. Together they go to New York, where she learns the truth about her family’s past, a truth that must change her regard for the father who has protected and cherished her. When a terrible lie has been told out of love, can it be forgiven? With courage and compassion, Belva Plain paints a moving portrait of the choices that shape the course of our lives, the secrets that haunt us, and the love that helps us heal and move on. It is a work of riveting storytelling and rare emotional power by one of the most gifted novelists of our time. From the Hardcover edition.
Car accidents, illnesses, falls, and temper tantrums that's what author Valinda Johnson was facing when she decided to become her elderly father's caregiver. In My Father's House Again shares an honest portrait of the situation facing so many baby boomers today. Valinda wondered if her dad should be in a nursing home, but he really wasn't ready. At ninety-four, he was able to dance and drive, but there was little else that interested him. But would he agree to come to live with her and her husband, Robert? After weighing all of the options, she and Robert came to the difficult conclusion that she must go to live with her father to care for him. It was a life change not only for her but also for her husband, who stayed behind until he was able to retire. It was only nine months, but it seemed like a lifetime. When she relocated 700 miles from everything that was familiar to her, she had no idea how difficult it would be to manage without Robert. Her dad had no intention of making anything easy for her, either. If she was to help him, it would be on his terms.
Kassian thoroughly explores the deeply meaningful metaphor of God as the perfect and loving Father.
For two sisters growing up surrounded by the Civil War, there is conflict both outside and inside their house.
Documents the tragic story of the Layton family's--Lisa, Deborah and Larry--involvement in the Jonestown mass suicide and the airport murders
We all ahve experienced personal experiencesa or encounters with people that have been hurt - even in the Church. The focus of this book is to encourage readers that your situation is not as rare as imagined. You will be challenged to obtain your healing and to help others recover. This book is designed for personal reflection and group study as each chapter ends with questions and calls to action.
It had not been a conscious decision to cling to the better memories of his childhood. It had just happened when Hannah came along and the possibility of a brighter future dragged his scowling face away from the details of his past. Now, standing in the middle of the poorly part-mowed field, in front of the house that was hiding all the reasons he had run away, he wondered if it would be possible to hold the past and present in tension.' Robbie Hanright has a normal, settled life in Dublin. With a wife and baby, an undemanding job and a nice home, everything is just as he wants it. However, after an enduring estrangement from the rural landscape of his youth, Robbie receives a phone call from his sister asking him to come home. Left with little choice, Robbie returns once more to County Down, and to Larkscroft Farm, to confront the father who tormented his childhood and face up to a history he wants only to forget. Set against the backdrop of a decaying farmhouse and fragile family connections, My Father's House is a powerful, lyrical story of loss and regret, through which Bethany Dawson reveals an affecting compassion for the profound, and often painful, complexities of family life.
A compelling novel of a man brought to reckon with his buried past. In St. Adrienne, a small black community in Louisiana, Reverend Phillip Martin—a respected minister and civil rights leader—comes face to face with the sins of his youth in the person of Robert X, a young, unkempt stranger who arrives in town for a mysterious "meeting" with the Reverend. In the confrontation between the two, the young man's secret burden explodes into the open, and Phillip Martin begins a long-neglected journey into his youth to discover how destructive his former life was, for himself and for those around him.
"From a quick-tempered singing grandmother to a performance of The Mikado in an African village: David Kinloch's exploration of his relationship with his father is both unexpected and affectionate. An extended sequence of poems moves from personal memory to reflections on the values embodied in such cultural father-figures as David Livingstone and the Irish patriot Roger Casement. Translations of poems by Paul Celan and others into vivid Scots illuminate the disturbing connections between patriarchy and twentieth-century violence. In contrast, moving and humorous 'dissections' of adult relationships evoke images of the body both scientific and spiritual."--BOOK JACKET.
'Dear Thrumpton, how I miss you tonight,' wrote George Seymour in 1944, when he was aged twenty-one. But the object of his affection was not a young woman, but a house -- ownership of which was then a distant dream. But he did eventually acquire Thrumpton, a beautiful country house in Nottinghamshire, and it was in this idyllic home that Miranda Seymour grew up. But her upbringing was far from idyllic, as life revolved around her father's capriciousness. The House took priority, and everything -- everyone -- else was secondary. Until, that is, the day late on in his life when George Seymour took to riding powerful motorbikes around the countryside clad in black leather in the company of a young male friend. Had he taken leave of his senses? Or finally found them? And how did this sea-change affect his wife and daughter? Both biography and family memoir, IN MY FATHER'S HOUSE is a riveting and ultimately shocking portrait of desire both overt and suppressed, and the devastating consequences of misplaced love.

Best Books