Eleven-year-old Cynthia and her six-year-old sister try to adjust to their parents' separation and divorce.
The warrior Sulien ap Gwien and her lord King Urdo have finally united the land of Tir Tanagiri into a kingdom ruled by justice under a single code of law. But where many see a hopeful future for the land, others believe they sense the seeds of a new tyranny. Soon Tir Tanagiri faces the blight of civil war, and Sulien ap Gwien must take up arms against former comrades and loved ones, fighting harder and harder to hold on to Urdo's shining dream. Continuing the epic begun in The King's Peace, this new novel brings the story of Sulien ap Gwien to a rousing and moving conclusion. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.
In everyday language, masochism is usually understood as the desire to abdicate control in exchange for sensation—pleasure, pain, or a combination thereof. Yet at its core, masochism is a site where power, bodies, and society come together. Sensational Flesh uses masochism as a lens to examine how power structures race, gender, and embodiment in different contexts. Drawing on rich and varied sources—from 19th century sexology, psychoanalysis, and critical theory to literary texts and performance art—Amber Jamilla Musser employs masochism as a powerful diagnostic tool for probing relationships between power and subjectivity. Engaging with a range of debates about lesbian S&M, racialization, femininity, and disability, as well as key texts such as Sacher-Masoch’s Venus in Furs, Pauline Réage’s The Story of O, and Michel Foucault's History of Sexuality, Musser renders legible the complex ways that masochism has been taken up by queer, feminist, and critical race theories. Furthering queer theory’s investment in affect and materiality, she proposes “sensation” as an analytical tool for illustrating what it feels like to be embedded in structures of domination such as patriarchy, colonialism, and racism and what it means to embody femininity, blackness, and pain. Sensational Flesh is ultimately about the ways in which difference is made material through race, gender, and sexuality and how that materiality is experienced.
Addiction Dilemmas explores the impact of addiction on those closest to the individuals affected and their families. Drawing on a wide range of sources, the book discusses the stresses and strains that family members are subjected to, the dilemmas that they face, and the coping strategies that they have found useful. Draws on a unique breadth of material to illustrate the dilemmas faced by family members in coping with a close relative's addiction Raises questions and points to controversies rather than dispensing prescriptive "one size fits all" advice Brings together accounts from research interviews, biography, autobiography and relevant fiction in a creative and original way Tackles common misunderstandings at public, practitioner, scholarly and policy levels about the predicaments that family members commonly find themselves in Each chapter closes with a commentary, questions and exercises designed to further develop understanding for professionals and students
Dramatizes the lives, problems, and failings of the people of a small New England town
This is a book about the power of love over all else. Both Danai and Fadzai are first-born children and expectations were understandably very high. The central message here is that parents need to impart all they believe their offspring need to get and this needs to be during the formative years. Young adults are subjected to societal influences that may not be in line with what the parents have in mind. Life lessons must be given but respect of the young mind is critical to maintain balance. Most parents find that they are busy with the day-to-day life demands, to the extent that their offspring are left to find their ways. Outside influences end up shaping the young minds. In this true story the challenge came when the two young adults fell in love and decided to marry. Their love was stronger than all efforts to separate them.
This episodic memoir of a girls life in Germany through World War II and its aftermath offers vivid descriptions of the feelings and experiences of a childs life in tumultuous times. Brief, intense memories of the young child are here recalled in the vocabulary of the adult. Gradually, they turn into longer narratives as the child grows older. Strung together and interwoven, they become a colorful tapestry depicting one familys evolution through many hardships as well as periods of beauty and enchantment.
This classic text, written by a father-and-son team, looks at the nuclear family as a social institution and provides guidance for interaction and adjustment during dating, engagement, and early marriage. The authors treat such practical matters as communicating, working through interpersonal differences, and growing in relationships within the family. They also discuss the impact of cultural expectations on family patterns and define ideal family roles developed in Scripture. Other topics covered include parenting, extended family relationships, finances, and nontraditional families. Now available in paperback.
Few musicals have had the impact of Lerner and Loewe's timeless classic My Fair Lady. Sitting in the middle of an era dominated by such seminal figures as Rodgers and Hammerstein, Frank Loesser, and Leonard Bernstein, My Fair Lady not only enjoyed critical success similar to that of its rivals but also had by far the longest run of a Broadway musical up to that time. From 1956 to 1962, its original production played without a break for 2,717 performances, and the show went on to be adapted into one of the most successful movie musicals of all time in 1964, when it won eight Academy Awards. Internationally, the show also broke records in London, and the original production toured to Russia at the height of the Cold War in an attempt to build goodwill. It remains a staple of the musical theater canon today, an oft-staged show in national, regional, and high school theaters across the country. Using previously-unpublished documents, author Dominic McHugh presents a completely new, behind-the-scenes look at the five-year creation of the show, revealing the tensions and complex relationships that went into its making. McHugh charts the show from the aftermath of the premiere of Shaw's Pygmalion and the playwright's persistent refusal to allow it to be made into a musical, through to the quarrel that led lyricist Alan Jay Lerner and composer Frederick Loewe to part ways halfway through writing the show, up to opening night and through to the present. This book is the first to shed light on the many behind-the-scenes creative discussions that took place from casting decisions all the way through the final months of frantic preparation leading to the premiere in March 1956. McHugh also traces sketches for the show, looking particularly at the lines cut during the rehearsal and tryout periods, to demonstrate how Lerner evolved the relationship between Higgins and Eliza in such a way as to maintain the delicate balance of ambiguity that characterizes their association in the published script. He looks too at the movie version, and how the cast album and subsequent revivals have influenced the way in which the show has been received. Overall, this book explores why My Fair Lady continues to resonate with audiences worldwide more than fifty years after its premiere.
Jamaica Kincaid's brother Devon Drew died of AIDS on January 19, 1996, at the age of thirty-three. Kincaid's incantatory, poetic, and often shockingly frank recounting of her brother's life and death is also a story of her family on the island of Antigua, a constellation centered on the powerful, sometimes threatening figure of the writer's mother. My Brother is an unblinking record of a life that ended too early, and it speaks volumes about the difficult truths at the heart of all families. My Brother is a 1997 National Book Award Finalist for Nonfiction.
Meredith Lee is one of the most successful women in television. She has a daytime show that has an audience of millions. She seems to have it all. But behind the tirelessly successful facade lies the story of a woman who nearly lost everything. This is the story of a woman who could not keep love in her life. The love of neither her father nor her mother. Who lost the love of her life the first time around, then lost the love of her own child. She could not even find love in herself. This is a story about women, about their sugar and spice, about the deep natural instincts that drive women through whatever society is trying to pin on them at the time. It is also about love, where to look for it and how to hold on to it when it is found.
In the world of the MacGreagors where gossip was the favorite form of entertainment, it was not always easy to keep a secret. Some managed to hide certain truths and take them to the grave, while others were not so successful. Many secrets were small and of no consequence, yet the discovery of one, well guarded secret was about to become deadly. Loved by young adults and baby-boomers alike, this 30 book historical family saga follows a Scottish highlander clan from the Viking era, through the middle ages, into the 20th century. From the first love story to the last, we hope you too will enjoy these tales of courageous men, strong women, fierce clan wars, fun characters, and perilous struggles to survive.
The daughter of a man who committed suicide at the age of thirty-five struggles to reconstruct her father using photographs, journal entries, and other artifacts, following the trail to Taos, New Mexico, where her parents' marriage fell apart and her father began his drug-fueled downward spiral. Reprint.
Bound in chains, enslaved barbarian Sir William Bradfer stands proud in the Constantinople slave market. As a warrior, he's trained in the art of survival. Lady-in-waiting Anna of Heraklea is betrothed to be married—against her will. Catching sight of the magnificent William, she finds a rebellious half plan forming in her mind. Anna can offer this captured knight freedom in return for his hand in marriage!
The life story of the Victorian novelist George Eliot is asdramatic and complex as her best plots. This new assessment of herlife and work combines recent biographical research withpenetrating literary criticism, resulting in revealing newinterpretations of her literary work. A fresh look at George Eliot's captivating life story Includes original new analysis of her writing Deploys the latest biographical research Combines literary criticism with biographical narrative tooffer a rounded perspective
African Voices, African Lives explores the world of 'Mohammed', a swahili peasant living on Mafia Island, Tanzania. Through his own words - some written, some spoken - and those of his relatives, including his ex-wife and one of his daughters, he enables us to see the world through his eyes, including the invisisble world of spirits which plays a significant role in his life. This information is gathered by Pat Caplan, the anthropologist, over almost three decades of talking and writing to each other. She acts not only as translator and editor, but also as interpreter, bringing in her own knowledge gathered from field data as well as comparative material from other anthropological work. By utilising a mixture of styles - narrative and life history, ethnographic observation, and the diary kept by Mohammed at the anthropologist's bequest, African Voices African Lives will make an important contribution to current debates in anthropology by grappling with issues raised by 'personal narratives', authorial authority, and with refexivity.
First published in 1914, W. H. R. Rivers' hugely influential study was the first to effectively demonstrate the close connection between methods of denoting relationship or kinship and forms of social organisation, including those based on different forms of the institution of marriage. He also shows that the terminology of relationship has been rigorously determined by social conditions and that, therefore, systems of relationship furnish us with a most valuable instrument in studying the history of social institutions. This series of lectures was originally delivered by the author in May 1914, at the London School of Economics. They are based on the experiences of the Percy Sladen Trust Expedition to Melanesia in 1908.
The battle for Saipan is remembered as one of the bloodiest battles fought in the Pacific during World War II, and was a turning point on the road to the defeat of Japan. In this work, the survivors—including Pacific Islanders on whose land the Americans and Japanese fought their war—have the opportunity to tell their stories in their own words. The author offers an introduction to the volume and arranges the oral histories by location—Saipan, Yap and Tinian, Rota, Palau Islands, and Guam—in the first half, and by branch of service in the second half.

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