CHILDREN'S BOOKS/AGES 4-8
In this true tale, Molly, now a grandmother in her seventies, tells the story of her real-life experiences in the sex trade in a series of graphic and lurid flash-backs. As the tranquil world of this mature and seemingly well-balanced woman is suddenly shattered by unexpected outbursts of bizarre and debilitating behavior, Molly’s daughter, Carin, is totally bewildered by her mother's strange antics. Carin has always had a good relationship with her mother, but knows nothing of Molly’s past. Molly’s friends are equally confused, but little by little, her story becomes clear: how Molly became enamored of the sex trade and how that lifestyle was deeply ingrained in her personality. Her journey into darkness is long and arduous. Exposed to sex far too soon because of her mother’s poor influence and bad example, Molly grew up around sex workers who groomed her for “the life.” Patrons exploited and abused her. When her father returned from his service in World War II, she hoped that he would help her off the path she had taken—only to have her dreams shattered. Instead of protecting her, he took advantage of her youth and promiscuity for his own financial gain. Molly is forced to do the unthinkable to gain control of her life. Told from the perspective of a survivor looking back and recovering from her experiences, In My Father’s House offers a unique and heartrending view of a girl growing up in the shadows of the sex trade.
In My Father's House is the story of Corrie's life with her mother, father, and the rest of her family before they began hiding Jewish people in their home. This book is a testament to how God prepared one family through a father's faithfulness to his Savior and the Word of God for the most sacrificial service a family could do. Beginning in the years before Corrie was born, it tells the story of Corrie's father, who was a loving husband to Corrie's mother and no ordinary man—he was determined to raise his children in the ways of the Lord. The book describes the extension of her father's devotion to God as Corrie herself becomes committed to the ministry of young people throughout her young adult life. All of this prepared her for her role in helping to save the lives of hundreds of Jews.
Already used in ministry by over 500 churches, this work is now available in paperback for the first time. The text chronicles the redemption of a soul from fear and shame to love, joy, and hope of family and friends. (Social Issues)
The rate of women entering prison has increased nearly 400 percent since 1980, with African American women constituting the largest percentage of this population. However, despite their extremely disproportional representation in correctional institutions, little attention has been paid to their experiences within the criminal justice system. Inner Lives provides readers the rare opportunity to intimately connect with African American women prisoners. By presenting the women's stories in their own voices, Paula C. Johnson captures the reality of those who are in the system, and those who are working to help them. Johnson offers a nuanced and compelling portrait of this fastest-growing prison population by blending legal history, ethnography, sociology, and criminology. These striking and vivid narratives are accompanied by equally compelling arguments by Johnson on how to reform our nation's laws and social policies, in order to eradicate existing inequalities. Her thorough and insightful analysis of the historical and legal background of contemporary criminal law doctrine, sentencing theories, and correctional policies sets the stage for understanding the current system.
Unwilling to see Asian American women silenced beneath the noisy discourses of feminists, cultural nationalists, and Eurocentric historians, Wendy Ho turns to specific spoken stories of mothers and daughters. Against reductive tendencies of scholarship, she places her own conversations with her China-born grandmother and her U.S.-born mother and her own readings of other Asian American women writers. She finds in the writings of Maxine Hong Kingston, Amy Tan, and Fae Myenne Ng not only complex mother-daughter relationships but many-faceted relationships to fathers, family, community, and culture. Always resisting the simplistic explanations, In Her Mother's House brings Asian American women's experience as mothers and daughters to the forefront of gender and ethnicity.
From battling ADHD and other mental matters like Psychotic Depression, for years, Dave has struggled with mental illness and addiction. He has built his world with his decisions and actions, pushing away everything he wants to hold close. Let Dave Monroe teach you how he built his house with no doors. Boxing himself into a corner of the world that many don't even know exists. Monroe's memoirs; traversing fact and fiction with an occasional voyage between reality and illusions are full of highs and lows that run through hospitals, jails and the not so occasional liquor store. It is an honest look at a hard life. Monroe holds nothing back and the emotion shines through. Compelling as it is, you will find this book hard to put down.
This is the extraordinary first-person account of a young woman's coming of age in Somalia and her struggles against the obligations and strictures of family and society. By the time she is nine, Aman has undergone a ritual circumcision ceremony; at eleven, her innocent romance with a white boy leads to a murder; at thirteen she is given away in an arranged marriage to a stranger. Aman eventually runs away to Mogadishu, where her beauty and rebellious spirit leads her to the decadent demimonde of white colonialists. Hers is a world in which women are both chattel and freewheeling entrepreneurs, subject to the caprices of male relatives, yet keenly aware of the loopholes that lead to freedom. Aman is an astonishing history, opening a window onto traditional Somali life and the universal quest for female self-awareness. From the Trade Paperback edition.
In one of the poorest parts of rural New Hampshire, teenage girls have been disappearing, snatched from back country roads, never to be seen alive again. For seventeen-year-old Marjorie Richards, the fear raised by these abductions is the backdrop to what she lives with her own home, every day. Marjorie has been raised by parents so intentionally isolated from normal society that they have developed their own dialect, a kind of mountain hybrid of English that displays both their ignorance of and disdain for the wider world. Marjorie is tormented by her classmates, who call her “The Talk-funny girl,” but as the nearby factory town sinks deeper into economic ruin and as her parents fall more completely under the influence of a sadistic cult leader, her options for escape dwindle. But then, thanks to a loving aunt, Marjorie is hired by a man, himself a victim of abuse, who is building what he calls “a cathedral,” right in the center of town. Day by day, Marjorie’s skills as a stoneworker increase, and so too does her intolerance for the bitter rules of her family life. Gradually, through exposure to the world beyond her parents’ wood cabin thanks to the kindness of her aunt and her boss, and an almost superhuman determination, she discovers what is loveable within herself. This newfound confidence and self-esteem ultimately allows her to break free from the bleak life she has known, to find love, to start a family, and to try to heal her old, deep wounds without passing that pain on to her husband and children. By turns darkly menacing and bright with love and resilience, The Talk-Funny Girl is the story of one young woman’s remarkable courage, a kind of road map for the healing of early abuse, and a testament to the power of kindness and love.
Siân Lincoln considers the use, role and significance of private spaces in the lives of young people. Drawing on extensive ethnographic research, she explores the place of 'the private' in youth cultural discourses, both historically and contemporarily, that until now have remained largely absent in youth cultural research.
In this vastly important, widely-acclaimed volume, Appiah, a Ghanaian philosopher who now teaches at Harvard, explores what it means to be an African American, on the many preconceptions that have muddled discussions of face, Africa, and Afrocentrism since the end of the 19th century. A New York Times Notable Book of the Year.
A young girl never forgets her first love. But what if this love is forbidden? Despite the age gap, Cndida had a crush on Andrew De Vito since she was eight years old. As time grew, so did her feelings for him. She never thought that one day, he would reciprocate her feelings for him, but he did. There was only one problem. He was already marriedto the church. Cndidas story, Secrets of Forbidden Love, is a beautiful and romantic tale of a forbidden love. It is also a story of love and forgiveness in several dimensions.
Berghash's impressionistic memoir charts her relationship with her homeland during a lifelong journey of self-discovery, beginning with a child's-eye view of the city's sacred mysteries, her family's religious orthodoxy, and the underlying kinship between Israelis and Palestinians. At 18, she serves in the Israeli army, but when she marries an American artist, she moves to New York City and raises a family. Living outside the homeland she loves and having abandoned her adherence to religious strictures, she shuttles between her original and adopted countries.
THE TRUTH Most Christians are acquainted with these patterns of behavior: relentless fault-finding, gossip, and the tendency to be easily offended. Out of the Courtroom exposes the root of these destructive patterns: idolatry. Every human lives as an idola counterfeit judge who presides over his or her own lifeuntil the coming of Jesus Christ and his enthronement on the judgment seat of the human heart. For a Christian, it cannot be surprising that this idolatry reigns in the world. But the hard truth is that destructive human judgment is easily observable in the life and witness of the Church and its membersa fundamental part of our disposition toward ourselves and others which robs us of much of our freedom in Jesus Christ and severely inhibits our formation into his likeness. THE CHALLENGE Anyone who desires to become a living witness to the Lordship of Jesus Christ and to know the freedom and power of life lived as a child of God must come to terms with this: unless Jesus is your only judge, he is not your only Lord. Out of the Courtroom, Into the Fathers House is a profound and vital teaching for the Church of Christ. This revelation of the far-reaching significance and true meaning of Jesus words do not judge illuminates a path of personal healing and liberation. Even more importantly, it opens a powerful way for the Church to live in the grace and truth of Jesus Christ whom she embodies. Dr. Linda Stalley, co-leader, the Maranatha Community, UK
This book was written to send a message to the Mothers in the urban areas about the serious issues in regards to Motherhood. The book contains less than 200 pages because I did not want to bore my readers with a lot of unnecessary dialogue.
Brought up in an environment riddled with substance abuse and neglect, Emma has big dreams and little chance of ever reaching them. By the age of fourteen she is on her own, determined to escape the mentality that has crippled her family, but to succeed would mean leaving behind her sister and betraying the only life she's ever known. From the Virginia countryside to the streets of Paris, through teenage motherhood and higher education, share Emma's tears and triumphs as she searches for acceptance in an exclusive world and finds love in the most unlikely of places.
In print, FW, the unnamed freelance Food Writer of Nancy Spillers sardonic debut novel, Entertaining Disasters, lives high on the food chain in the heady realm of L.A.s culinary journalism scene. She waxes poetic about her hip home gatherings, thinly veiling the identities of her Hollywood guest list. But in reality, FWs been inventing the dinner parties she writes about because social paralysis sets in at the very thought of a real guest in her fabulous—or is it shabby?—hillside home. Enter the glossy food magazine editor, new in town, who wants an invitation to one of her bashes, and the panic-stricken journey from fantasy hostess to reality bites is on. Entertaining Disasters—at turns whimsical and deeply affecting—chronicles the struggle FW faces in the week before she hosts her first real dinner party in ages. At the same time, her estranged sister threatens to drop by, her husband takes off, and her house implodes. In the way of Nora Ephrons Heartburn, Spillers book is filled with the fabulous culinary lore and delicious-sounding recipes that have made FWs writing such popular foodie mania. Now all she has to do is somehow bring this fantasy world into workaday reality.

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