This study brings together three closely related aspects of Maori literature - myth, memory and identity. It examines selected novels by Witi Ihimaera and Patricia Grace in order to trace an ever-developing Maori identity that has changed considerably over three decades of the Maori novel. This book demonstrates that an investigation of the construction of identity in literature benefits from a close look at the importance of Maori mythology as well as associated cultural and individual memories. Indicating that Maori fiction has become what Homi Bhabha terms a third space, this book verifies the links between novel, myth and memory with the help of existing research in these areas in order to assess their importance for the reinterpretation of identity. The Maori novels that depict situations reflecting current issues are viewed as an experimental playground in which authors can explore a variety of solutions to tribal, societal and political issues. This study establishes the early novels as reinterpretations of the past and guides to the future, and characterises the more recent novels as representing a move towards empowerment and pioneering that has not yet come to a conclusion.
From literary journalist Sara Mansfield Taber comes a deep and wondrous memoir of her exotic childhood as the daughter of a covert CIA operative. Born under an Assumed Name portrays the thrilling and confusing life of a girl growing up abroad in a world of secrecy and diplomacyùand the heavy toll it takes on her and her father. As Taber leads us on a tour through the alluring countries to which her father is assigned, we track two parallel storiesùthose of young Sara and her Cold War spy father. Sara struggles for normalcy as the family is relocated to cities in North America, Europe, and Asia, and the constant upheaval eventually exacts its price. Only after a psychiatric hospitalization at age sixteen in a U.S. Air Force hospital with shell-shocked Vietnam War veterans does she come to a clear sense of who she is. Meanwhile, Sara's sweet-natured, philosophical father becomes increasingly disillusioned with his work, his agency, and his country. This is the question at the heart of this elegant and sophisticated work: what does it mean to be an American? In this fascinating, painful, and ultimately exhilarating coming-of-age story, young Sara confronts generosity, greatness, and tragedyùall that America heaps on the world.
What if Jesus never died for you? What if his sole intention was to teach unconditional and universal love not only for you but for the entire world? Michael John Bohoskey challenges us to take a different look at the role of Jesus Christ-and religion in general-in his spiritually awakening memoir, Waking from a Fallen Dream. Even though a variety of Christian teachings defined Bohoskey's early life, he eventually discovered that many of his beliefs had to do with feelings of personal unworthiness and mistrust of his own nature. A former Episcopal priest, Bohoskey began a journey of self-discovery, questioning the most basic fundamentals of Christianity. In Waking from a Fallen Dream, he questions the beliefs that teach us that we are sinful by nature and separate from God. Instead, he believes that we should all wake to our own "knowingness" and empowerment, abandoning the collective programming we have allowed to control us. This is a book about giving oneself permission to question, explore, choose, live, and love without apology. Waking from a Fallen Dream is Bohoskey's heartfelt story of how he shed multiple uniforms of belief and behavior while following the yellow-brick road of inner knowledge, allowing him to experience spiritual integrity and give unconditional love the opportunity to unfold.
Ishmael Reed’s inspired fable of the ragtime era, in which a social movement threatens to suppress the spread of black culture—hailed by Harold Bloom as one of the five hundred greatest books of the Western canon In 1920s America, a plague is spreading fast. From New Orleans to Chicago to New York, the “Jes Grew” epidemic makes people desperate to dance, overturning social norms in the process. Anyone is vulnerable and when they catch it, they’ll bump and grind into a frenzy. Working to combat the Jes Grew infection are the puritanical Atonists, a group bent on cultivating a “Talking Android,” an African American who will infiltrate the unruly black communities and help crush the outbreak. But PaPa LaBas, a houngan voodoo priest, is determined to keep his ancient culture—including a key spiritual text—alive. Spanning a dizzying host of genres, from cinema to academia to mythology, Mumbo Jumbo is a lively ride through a key decade of American history. In addition to ragtime, blues, and jazz, Reed’s allegory draws on the Harlem Renaissance, the Back to Africa movement, and America’s occupation of Haiti. His style throughout is as avant-garde and vibrant as the music at its center. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Ishmael Reed including rare images of the author.
For 35,000 years ancient Afghanistan was called Aryana (the Light of God) has existed. Then in 747 AD what is today called Afghanistan became Khorasan (which means Sunrise in Dari) which was a much larger geographical area. In the middle of the nineteenth century the name Afghanistan, which means home of the united tribes, was applied originally by the Saxons (present day British) and the Russians. During the Great Games in the middle of nineteenth century, the Durand Line was created in 1893 and was in place until 1993. Saxons created the state of Afghanistan out of a geographical area roughly the size of Texas: in 1893 before which there were 10 million square kilometers, larger than the size of Canada, as means to act as a buffer zone between the Saxon-India & Tsarist-Russia and the Chinese.
Myths are a rich source of history. Even before myths were written down, people told and retold the stories of the gods and goddesses of their homeland. Learn the history of the South Pacific myths, as well as their deeper meaning, from the desert tribesof Australia to New Zealand's origin of the coconut.
A lawyer for the Big Bad Wolf earnestly pleads his client’s innocence in court. Mother Earth and Father Sky give birth to a rebellious child whose fiery temper threatens to destroy the world. A teenage boy discovers the complexities of fame after his band’s first album skyrockets to the top of the charts. Tornado warnings turn a young girl’s routine babysitting job into a fight for survival. These are just a few of the imaginative, daring, and thought-provoking stories found in these pages. Also included are dozens of poems and personal essays exploring everything from travel to friendship, love to loss, fear to hope. What makes this book truly unique is it was written entirely by kids and teenagers. Dancing with the Pen features the work of more than sixty young writers in elementary school, middle school and high school. These authors come from all across the United States, from California to New York, from Kentucky to Michigan, as well as from abroad: Singapore, Canada, New Zealand. However, the themes and situations they explore transcend hometowns, backgrounds and cultures – they are familiar to us all. Dancing with the Pen is a book for young writers and young readers – and the young at heart. Even if you are not normally a voracious reader, this book is still for you. Every piece within these covers is written by someone who understands what it is like to be a young person today. Maybe you will recognize yourself in these pages. Perhaps you will even be inspired to pick up a pen, step out on the dance floor, and go for a whirl yourself.
"This book describes the basic elements of a belief system that has survived the onslaught of Catholicism, colonialism, and the modern world. Timothy Knab has spent thirty years working in this area of Mexico, learning of the Most Holy Earth and following what its people there call "the good path." He was initiated as a dreamer, learned the prayers and techniques for curing maladies of the human soul, and from his long association with Sanmartinos has constructed a thorough account of their beliefs and practices."--BOOK JACKET.
One of the New York Times Book Review's 10 Best Books of the Year A daughter's unforgettable memoir of her wild and haunted father, a man whose war never really ended. From her charismatic father, Danielle Trussoni learned how to rock and roll, outrun the police, and never shy away from a fight. Spending hour upon hour trailing him around the bars and honky-tonks of La Crosse, Wisconsin, young Danielle grew up fascinated by stories of her dad's adventures as a tunnel rat in Vietnam, where he'd risked his life crawling head first into narrow passageways to search for American POWs. A vivid and poignant portrait of a daughter's relationship with her father, this funny, heartbreaking, and beautifully written memoir, Falling Through the Earth, "makes plain that the horror of war doesn't end in the trenches" (Vanity Fair).
"As a little boy, I had a dream that my father had taken me to the woods where there was a dead body. He buried it and told me I must never tell. It was the only thing we'd ever done together as father and son, and I promised not to tell. But unlike most dreams, the memory of this one never left me. And sometimes...I wasn't altogether sure about one thing: was it just a dream?" When Augusten Burroughs was small, his father was a shadowy presence in his life: a form on the stairs, a cough from the basement, a silent figure smoking a cigarette in the dark. As Augusten grew older, something sinister within his father began to unfurl. Something dark and secretive that could not be named. Betrayal after shocking betrayal ensued, and Augusten's childhood was over. The kind of father he wanted didn't exist for him. This father was distant, aloof, uninterested... And then the "games" began. With A Wolf at the Table, Augusten Burroughs makes a quantum leap into untapped emotional terrain: the radical pendulum swing between love and hate, the unspeakably terrifying relationship between father and son. Told with scorching honesty and penetrating insight, it is a story for anyone who has ever longed for unconditional love from a parent. Though harrowing and brutal, A Wolf at the Table will ultimately leave you buoyed with the profound joy of simply being alive. It's a memoir of stunning psychological cruelty and the redemptive power of hope.
Egypt, 1964. The great temple at Abu Simbel must be rescued from the rising waters of the Aswan Dam. Block by block it is to be dismantled and resurrected sixty metres higher. This most delicate and daunting of tasks is overseen by Avery, a young engineer who at the same time is carefully, and joyfully, constructing a shared life with his new wife, Jean. But not everything can be saved once the floodgates have opened. Villages will be deluged. Graves will be moved. Thousands will be exiled from their ancient homes and from the river that has been their lifeblood, and no feat of engineering can prevent this. As the temple is taken apart and rebuilt, Avery and Jean suffer a terrible loss of their own. Their separate journeys through the landscape of grief will take them from Egypt, to Canada, to lands that have been flooded and reconfigured and homes that have been lost, to a guerrilla painter of the past whose story of destruction, reconstruction and replication in war-devastated Poland is built out of equal parts hope and despair. Weaving historical moments with the quiet intimacy of human lives, The Winter Vault tells of the ways in which we salvage what we can from the violence of life. It is the story of a husband and a wife trying to find their way back to each other; of people and nations displaced and uprooted and of the myriad means by which we all seek out a place we can call home. It is a breathtaking and heartbreaking novel about the inescapability of memories, the devastation of loss, and the restorative power of love.
Color photos fill this guide. The author lives in Kauai, one of the most beautiful places on earth. Here we focus on the southern coast of Kauai. This is the most thorough guide to this area available, with candid hotel and restaurant reviews based on detailed personal inspections. You'll find lavish beachfront resorts, intimate rain-forest B&Bs, family-friendly condos, and much, much more. Our dining reviews range from Asian-fusion cuisine to hearty, affordable plate lunches. Where to find secluded beaches; secret spots for snorkeling; the best outfitters for everything from diving to deep-sea fishing; the top galleries and shops. Family-friendly accommodations and activities; tips on how to get married in the islands; recommendations for the best honeymoon resorts; and advice on finding the best airfares and package deals. Shopping, sightseeing, the beaches, parks, trails, waterfalls all the details are here. The best places for fishing, hiking, golf, tennis, scuba, ocean kayaking, along with camping, horseback riding, biking, whalewatching. The best hikes, bike trips and watersports are described, with information on the tour operators. It's here in the southern part of the island where the new and old worlds of Kauai converge to create a spectacle of beauty and fun that you won't get anywhere else on the island. If you love action, this is the place to be because there's plenty of it. First-class restaurants, accommodations, beaches and a tremendous number of activities await. The South Shore is the sunny side of the island, so you can feel free to work on your tan, cool off in the ocean or enjoy the trade winds blowing in from the ocean. Turning on Highway 520 from Kaumualii Highway (Highway 50), the first thing you'll notice is the Tunnel of Treesatowering over you. After a few minutes heading down the winding road, you'll get to Koloa Town, which represents the old world of Kauai. The area was a prime destination for whalers who landed at Koloa Landing, as well as for sugar plantation workers, which made Poipu a bustling economic center. Koloa was the site of Hawaii's first successful sugar plantation, established in 1835. There are plenty of old churches and homes (especially down Waikomo Road) that maintain the charm of this town. Poipuahas the attractions and activities that draw visitors from all over the world. Moir Gardensais part of the Outrigger Kiahuna Plantation property..This renowned garden is worth a visit. Just west of Poipu, you'll seeaPrince Kuhio Park. National Tropical Botanical Gardens is the only tropical botanical garden with a charter from the United States Congress and it includes McBryde Gardens and Allerton Gardens. You can walk around the grounds here at no charge and browse among the bananas, pineapples and bamboo trees, among many, many other plants OCo the largest collection of native plants in existence. Spouting Hornais part tourist spectacle, part shopping destination and part natural wonder. The phenomenon of Spouting Horn occurs when incoming waves rush through a hole in the rock.aKukuiolono Park is another unforgettable sight. Kukuilono means light of the god Lono in Hawaiian. There's a walking loop about one mile long that goes through a lava rock garden, a Hawaiian garden and a beautiful Japanese garden with a stone footbridge, sculptures, bonsai trees and fountains overgrown with plants."
Here is the 2nd Edition of this guide, totally and thoroughly updated with the latest information on hotels, restaurants, shopping, tour guides and all activities. Hundreds of color photos throughout the guide. The author lives in Kauai, one of the most beautiful places on earth, from Waimea Canyon (Mark Twain called it The Grand Canyon of the Pacific ) to the majestic Na Pali cliffs. This is the most thorough guide to the island available, with candid hotel reviews based on detailed personal inspections. You'll find lavish beachfront resorts, intimate rain-forest B&Bs, family-friendly condos, and much, much more. Our dining reviews range from Asian-fusion cuisine to hearty, affordable plate lunches. Where to find secluded beaches; secret spots for snorkeling; the best outfitters for everything from diving to deep-sea fishing; the top galleries and shops. Family-friendly accommodations and activities; tips on how to get married in the islands; recommendations for the best honeymoon resorts; and advice on finding the best airfares and package deals. Shopping, sightseeing, the beaches, parks, trails, waterfalls all the details are here. The best places for fishing, hiking, golf, tennis, scuba, ocean kayaking, along with camping, horseback riding, biking, whalewatching. The best hikes, bike trips and watersports are described, with information on the tour operators.
To the Navajo, sandpaintings are sacred, living entities that reflect the interconnectedness of all living beings--humans, plants, stars, animals, and mountains. This book, now available in paperback, explores the circularity of Navajo thought in sandpaintings, Navajo chantway myths, and stories reflected in the celestial constellations. Beautifully illustrated by the author, this well-documented book explores the spiritual world of the Navajo, their ceremonial practices, and their conceptions of time and stellar motion. Griffin-Pierce shows how the images of sacred sandpaintings not only communicate the temporal and spatial dimensions of the Navajo universe but also present, in visual form, Navajo ideas about relationships among nature, self, and society. "Griffin-Pierce's approach is highly original, bringing this material together in an innovative and creative manner while grounding it holistically within the context of Navajo world view."--M. Jane Young, author ofSigns from the Ancestors: Zuni Cultural Symbolism and Perceptions of Rock Art
A young woman fights for survival amid the brutality of the last Ice Age It’s 7056 BC, a time before history. On the first day that Chagak’s womanhood is acknowledged within her Aleut tribe, she unexpectedly finds herself betrothed to Seal Stalker, the most promising young hunter in the village. A bright future lies ahead of Chagak—but in one violent moment, she loses her entire way of life. Left with her infant brother, Pup, and only a birdskin parka for warmth, Chagak sets out across the icy waters on a quest for survival and revenge. Mother Earth Father Sky is the first book of the Ivory Carver Trilogy, which also includes My Sister the Moon and Brother Wind.
In this collection, Leila Castle has gathered together women writing about spiritual initiation, identity, and transformation. Their pilgrimages are inspired by places sacred to many traditions worldwide—among them Old European Goddess, geomancy, Tibetan Buddhism, Native American, Peruvian shamanism, and Mayan. Their stories explore interdependence and autonomy, connection to the earth, and developing a new spiritual voice. They relate journeys to far-off Australia, Hawaii, and Africa, as well as to rural England and New Mexico. Sometimes they write and about becoming a person vastly different from the wife, mother, artist student, or academic individual who started the journey. Inspiring and illuminating, these are adventures stories into the unknown and deeply felt. Honoring the sacred feminine energy of the earth, these women are also working towards rebalancing male and female energies in culture and relationships.
My Dad Was So Mean is the true story of one girl's experiences growing up with five feisty brothers (four older) in Buffalo, New York, during the early 1950's. Curious, adventurous kids, they drive their father nearly crazy, until the day the girl makes a momentous, family-changing discovery.
Red Sky in the Morning is an unputdownable historical story from Margaret Dickinson, richly evocative of the Lincolnshire landscape. A young girl stands alone in the cobbled marketplace of a small Lincolnshire town, bedraggled, soaked through and very afraid. Who is she? Where has she come from and from whom is she running away? No one knows or cares. Only kindly farmer Eddie Appleyard recognizes something in the girl that touches his heart. In a drunken haze and scarcely realizing what he is doing, Eddie takes her home, even though his wife is a tyrant, who will believe the worst. 'Is this your fancy piece?' Bertha accuses and turns Anna out into the cold, wet night. Eddie hides the girl in the hayloft and, later, in a tumbledown shepherd's cottage that becomes her new home. Anna's arrival will change their lives; Eddie's, Bertha's and even that of their young son, Tony, torn between his warring parents and the mysterious stranger. It will take years for the secrets of Anna's former life to be revealed, but Bertha bides her time and awaits her moment, little realizing the tragedy her vengeance will unleash.
Laser, leather and light dome myth. A horror novel for advanced readers.

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