This study brings together three closely related aspects of Maori literature - myth, memory and identity. It examines selected novels by Witi Ihimaera and Patricia Grace in order to trace an ever-developing Maori identity that has changed considerably over three decades of the Maori novel. This book demonstrates that an investigation of the construction of identity in literature benefits from a close look at the importance of Maori mythology as well as associated cultural and individual memories. Indicating that Maori fiction has become what Homi Bhabha terms a third space, this book verifies the links between novel, myth and memory with the help of existing research in these areas in order to assess their importance for the reinterpretation of identity. The Maori novels that depict situations reflecting current issues are viewed as an experimental playground in which authors can explore a variety of solutions to tribal, societal and political issues. This study establishes the early novels as reinterpretations of the past and guides to the future, and characterises the more recent novels as representing a move towards empowerment and pioneering that has not yet come to a conclusion.
From literary journalist Sara Mansfield Taber comes a deep and wondrous memoir of her exotic childhood as the daughter of a covert CIA operative. Born under an Assumed Name portrays the thrilling and confusing life of a girl growing up abroad in a world of secrecy and diplomacyùand the heavy toll it takes on her and her father. As Taber leads us on a tour through the alluring countries to which her father is assigned, we track two parallel storiesùthose of young Sara and her Cold War spy father. Sara struggles for normalcy as the family is relocated to cities in North America, Europe, and Asia, and the constant upheaval eventually exacts its price. Only after a psychiatric hospitalization at age sixteen in a U.S. Air Force hospital with shell-shocked Vietnam War veterans does she come to a clear sense of who she is. Meanwhile, Sara's sweet-natured, philosophical father becomes increasingly disillusioned with his work, his agency, and his country. This is the question at the heart of this elegant and sophisticated work: what does it mean to be an American? In this fascinating, painful, and ultimately exhilarating coming-of-age story, young Sara confronts generosity, greatness, and tragedyùall that America heaps on the world.
What if Jesus never died for you? What if his sole intention was to teach unconditional and universal love not only for you but for the entire world? Michael John Bohoskey challenges us to take a different look at the role of Jesus Christ-and religion in general-in his spiritually awakening memoir, Waking from a Fallen Dream. Even though a variety of Christian teachings defined Bohoskey's early life, he eventually discovered that many of his beliefs had to do with feelings of personal unworthiness and mistrust of his own nature. A former Episcopal priest, Bohoskey began a journey of self-discovery, questioning the most basic fundamentals of Christianity. In Waking from a Fallen Dream, he questions the beliefs that teach us that we are sinful by nature and separate from God. Instead, he believes that we should all wake to our own "knowingness" and empowerment, abandoning the collective programming we have allowed to control us. This is a book about giving oneself permission to question, explore, choose, live, and love without apology. Waking from a Fallen Dream is Bohoskey's heartfelt story of how he shed multiple uniforms of belief and behavior while following the yellow-brick road of inner knowledge, allowing him to experience spiritual integrity and give unconditional love the opportunity to unfold.
To the Navajo, sandpaintings are sacred, living entities that reflect the interconnectedness of all living beings--humans, plants, stars, animals, and mountains. This book, now available in paperback, explores the circularity of Navajo thought in sandpaintings, Navajo chantway myths, and stories reflected in the celestial constellations. Beautifully illustrated by the author, this well-documented book explores the spiritual world of the Navajo, their ceremonial practices, and their conceptions of time and stellar motion. Griffin-Pierce shows how the images of sacred sandpaintings not only communicate the temporal and spatial dimensions of the Navajo universe but also present, in visual form, Navajo ideas about relationships among nature, self, and society. "Griffin-Pierce's approach is highly original, bringing this material together in an innovative and creative manner while grounding it holistically within the context of Navajo world view."--M. Jane Young, author ofSigns from the Ancestors: Zuni Cultural Symbolism and Perceptions of Rock Art
Struggling to escape a Great Depression era, Dust Bowl-devastated Oklahoma after the tragic deaths of his parents, Jack Catcher joins a classmate's plot to run away to Texas, an endeavor marked by train-hopping, a run-in with a notorious gangster and an encounter with a former carnival wrestler. By the Bram Stoker Award-winning author of the Hap and Leonard series.
"This book describes the basic elements of a belief system that has survived the onslaught of Catholicism, colonialism, and the modern world. Timothy Knab has spent thirty years working in this area of Mexico, learning of the Most Holy Earth and following what its people there call "the good path." He was initiated as a dreamer, learned the prayers and techniques for curing maladies of the human soul, and from his long association with Sanmartinos has constructed a thorough account of their beliefs and practices."--BOOK JACKET.
Peking, 1914. When the eight-year-old princess Eastern Jewel is caught spying on her father's liaison with a servant girl, she is banished from the palace, sent to live with a powerful family in Japan. Renamed Yoshiko Kawashima, she quickly falls in love with her adoptive country, where she earns a scandalous reputation, taking fencing lessons, smoking opium, and entertaining numerous lovers. Sent to Mongolia to become an obedient wife, Yoshiko mounts a daring escape and eventually finds her way back to Peking high society-this time with orders from the Japanese secret service. Based on the true story of a rebellious woman who earned a controversial place in history, The Private Papers of Eastern Jewel is a vibrant reimagining of a thrilling life-a rich historical epic of palace intrigue, sexual manipulation, and international espionage.
"As a little boy, I had a dream that my father had taken me to the woods where there was a dead body. He buried it and told me I must never tell. It was the only thing we'd ever done together as father and son, and I promised not to tell. But unlike most dreams, the memory of this one never left me. And sometimes...I wasn't altogether sure about one thing: was it just a dream?" When Augusten Burroughs was small, his father was a shadowy presence in his life: a form on the stairs, a cough from the basement, a silent figure smoking a cigarette in the dark. As Augusten grew older, something sinister within his father began to unfurl. Something dark and secretive that could not be named. Betrayal after shocking betrayal ensued, and Augusten's childhood was over. The kind of father he wanted didn't exist for him. This father was distant, aloof, uninterested... And then the "games" began. With A Wolf at the Table, Augusten Burroughs makes a quantum leap into untapped emotional terrain: the radical pendulum swing between love and hate, the unspeakably terrifying relationship between father and son. Told with scorching honesty and penetrating insight, it is a story for anyone who has ever longed for unconditional love from a parent. Though harrowing and brutal, A Wolf at the Table will ultimately leave you buoyed with the profound joy of simply being alive. It's a memoir of stunning psychological cruelty and the redemptive power of hope.
One of the New York Times Book Review's 10 Best Books of the Year A daughter's unforgettable memoir of her wild and haunted father, a man whose war never really ended. From her charismatic father, Danielle Trussoni learned how to rock and roll, outrun the police, and never shy away from a fight. Spending hour upon hour trailing him around the bars and honky-tonks of La Crosse, Wisconsin, young Danielle grew up fascinated by stories of her dad's adventures as a tunnel rat in Vietnam, where he'd risked his life crawling head first into narrow passageways to search for American POWs. A vivid and poignant portrait of a daughter's relationship with her father, this funny, heartbreaking, and beautifully written memoir, Falling Through the Earth, "makes plain that the horror of war doesn't end in the trenches" (Vanity Fair).
Palestine. For most of us, the word brings to mind a series of confused images and disjointed associations-massacres, refugee camps, UN resolutions, settlements, terrorist attacks, war, occupation, checkered kouffiyehs and suicide bombers, a seemingly endless cycle of death and destruction. This novel does not shy away from such painful images, but it is first and foremost a powerful human story, following the life of a young girl from her days in the village of al-Tantoura in Palestine up to the dawn of the new century. We participate in events as they unfold, seeing them through the uneducated but sharply intelligent mind of Ruqayya, as she tries to make sense of all that has happened to her and her family. With her, we live her love of her land and of her people; we feel the repeated pain of loss, of diaspora and of cross-generational misunderstanding; and above all, we come to know her indomitable human spirit. As we read we discover that we have become part of Ruqayya's family, and her voice will remain with us long after we have closed the book.
My Dad Was So Mean is the true story of one girl's experiences growing up with five feisty brothers (four older) in Buffalo, New York, during the early 1950's. Curious, adventurous kids, they drive their father nearly crazy, until the day the girl makes a momentous, family-changing discovery.
A seventy-year-old West Indian woman looks back over the course of her life and examines the relationships that have given meaning to her existence
The Hockey Sweater, the title story in this 20-story collection, has become an enduring classic: a Quebec boy and Habs fan is shipped a Toronto Maple Leafs sweater by mistake. It encapsulates everything you need to understand French and English Canada, told with humour and love.
The publication of the King James version of the Bible, translated between 1603 and 1611, coincided with an extraordinary flowering of English literature and is universally acknowledged as the greatest influence on English-language literature in history. Now, world-class literary writers introduce the book of the King James Bible in a series of beautifully designed, small-format volumes. The introducers' passionate, provocative, and personal engagements with the spirituality and the language of the text make the Bible come alive as a stunning work of literature and remind us of its overwhelming contemporary relevance.
COLD APRIL by John P. McEneny. Set in Rawanda in 1994, a thirteen-year old girl refuses to hand over her friends to the Hutu rebels. REUNION by Brian Podnos. A father and son must face their demons when the son is released from rehab. FIGHTING FIRES by Von H. Washington, Sr. On the eve of his 18th birthday, a young man kidnaps his absentee father and demands the attention he believes was owed him during his developmental years. JACK by Daren Taylor. Jack, a dark retelling of an old fairy tale. For every dream, there's a nightmare. What happens when a boy believes that he's seen God? MARKED by Cassandra Lewis, a dark comedy that explores the connection between love, insanity and social responsibility. ALWAYS ANASTASIA by Michele Leigh. A disillusioned cop on the verge of a nervous breakdown believes he is being tormented by a narcissistic psychopath. THIS QUIET HOUSE by Toby Levin. What happens when a stepmother's desire to have a son catches fire? WHAT CHEER, IOWA by Jeff Belanger. Tempers flare and sanity is on the line as five people struggle against the gargantuan pressure of waiting to find out if their cars passed their annual inspection.
The anticipated American debut of one of Granta’s Best Young Spanish-Language Novelists: a daring, deeply affecting novel about the secrets buried in the past of an Argentine family. A young writer, living abroad, makes the journey home to South America to say good-bye to his dying father. In his parents’ house, he finds a cache of documents—articles, maps, photographs—and unwittingly begins to unearth his father’s obsession with the disappearance of a local man. Suddenly he comes face-to-face with the ghosts of Argentina’s dark political past and with the long-hidden memories of his family’s underground resistance against an oppressive military regime. As the fragments of the narrator’s investigation fall into place—revealing not only a part of his father’s life he had tried to forget but also the legacy of an entire generation—this audacious novel tells a completely original story of corruption and responsibility, history and remembrance.
Alice is a girl no different from any girl growing up today in America. She lives in Africa but has dreams and a family she loves and who loves her. Soon her life becomes nothing like what most girls here have to encounter. War becomes a looming threat and causes financial loss and periodic separation from loved ones. Gossip leads to mistrust and broken hearts. HIV and AIDS becomes a source of confusion and fear. An antiquated system of marriage leads to homelessness and total lonliness. A friendship is reconcilliated but turns into her biggest curse of all. All the while a relationship with God is all Alice can truly count on.
Set on the Gulf Coast of Florida, the Marsh family faces what many American families have experienced in the last few decades: the reorganization of the family through divorce. This bittersweet novel has been called by one reviewer the funniest story since Auntie Mame. As mother Linda Marsh re-enters the dating world at the same time that her 15-year-old son does, comic, realistic situations develop. Eventually the three Marsh children and their mother, Linda, learn that the change in the family demands that they embrace the future and change with it. This novel became a CBS/Hallmark Channel movie in l999, starring Mary McDonnell, Tippi Hedren, Camilla Belle, Eric Von Detten as well as other renowned actors. The novel has been used in high school classes, college literature courses, and family study groups in discussions on adjustment to divorce.
From Mary Baker Eddy, the founder of the Church of Christian Science, to Deepak Chopra, Americans have struggled with the connection between health and happiness. Barbara Wilson was taught by her Christian Scientist family that there was no sickness or evil, and that by maintaining this belief she would be protected. But such beliefs were challenged when Wilson's own mother died of breast cancer after deciding not to seek medical attention, having been driven mad by the contradiction between her religion and her reality. In this perceptive and textured memoir Blue Windows, Wilson surveys the complex history of Christian Science and the role of women in religion and healing.
NATIONAL BESTSELLER WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE The searing, post-apocalyptic novel about a father and son's fight to survive. A father and his son walk alone through burned America. Nothing moves in the ravaged landscape save the ash on the wind. It is cold enough to crack stones, and when the snow falls it is gray. The sky is dark. Their destination is the coast, although they don't know what, if anything, awaits them there. They have nothing; just a pistol to defend themselves against the lawless bands that stalk the road, the clothes they are wearing, a cart of scavenged food—and each other. The Road is the profoundly moving story of a journey. It boldly imagines a future in which no hope remains, but in which the father and his son, "each the other's world entire," are sustained by love. Awesome in the totality of its vision, it is an unflinching meditation on the worst and the best that we are capable of: ultimate destructiveness, desperate tenacity, and the tenderness that keeps two people alive in the face of total devastation. A New York Times Notable Book One of the Best Books of the Year The Boston Globe, The Christian Science Monitor, The Denver Post, The Kansas City Star, Los Angeles Times, New York, People, Rocky Mountain News, Time, The Village Voice, The Washington Post

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