"I think what is always really amazing to me is that Navajo are never amazed by anything that happens. Because it is like in a lot of our stories they are already there."--Sunny Dooley, Navajo Storyteller During the final decade of the twentieth century, Navajo people had to confront a number of challenges, from unexplained illness, the effects of uranium mining, and problem drinking to threats to their land rights and spirituality. Yet no matter how alarming these issues, Navajo people made sense of them by drawing guidance from what they regarded as their charter for life, their origin stories. Through extensive interviews, Maureen Trudelle Schwarz allows Navajo to speak for themselves on the ways they find to respond to crises and chronic issues. In capturing what Navajo say and think about themselves, Schwarz presents this southwestern people's perceptions, values, and sense of place in the world.
"A call for the rethinking Navajo sovereignty in a way more rooted in Navajo beliefs, culture, and values"--Provided by publisher.
This ambitious book probes our biological past to discover the kinds of lives that human beings have imagined were worth living. Bellah’s theory goes deep into cultural and genetic evolution to identify a range of capacities (communal dancing, storytelling, theorizing) whose emergence made religious development possible in the first millennium BCE.
Welche Bildung brauchen und wollen wir? Angesichts einer ungewissen Zukunft reicht das gegenwärtig vorherrschende Verständnis von Bildung unter Maximen von wirtschaftlicher und politischer Verwertbarkeit und Anpassung nicht aus. Das zwingt für eine umwelt- und nachhaltigkeitsorientierte Bildung zu einer kritischen Klärung. Das in der Bildungspolitik gängige schulpädagogische Menschenbild genügt dafür durch seine behavioristisch-milieutheoretische Einengung nicht. Das Buch gibt Auskünfte über Eckpunkte einer zukunftsfähigen Persönlichkeitsbildung, indem in einem breiten interdisziplinären Reigen ausgewiesene Fachwissenschaftler wie auch Praktiker aus Medizin, Ethnologie, Kultur- und Sozialwissenschaften, Pädagogik und Philosophie hilfreiche Klärungen anbieten. Rahmengebender Auftakt ist der exklusive Abdruck der 9. Sustainability Lecture an der HNE Eberswalde, gehalten vom Begründer des Alternativen Nobelpreises, Jakob von Uexküll.
This life history of a Navajo leader, recorded in the 1960s and first published in 1977, is a classic work in the study of Navajo history and religious traditions. "A skillful, meticulous, and altogether praiseworthy contribution to Navajo studies. . . . Although the focus of Mitchell's autobiography is upon his role as a Blessingway singer, there is much material here on Navajo history and culture in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Mitchell attended the government school at Fort Defiance, worked on the railroad in Arizona, served as a handyman and interpreter at several trading posts and the Franciscan missions, and later served as a tribal councilman in the 1930s and as a judge in the 1940s and 1950s. His observations on these experiences are relevant to our understanding of contemporary Navajo life."--Lawrence C. Kelly,Western Historical Quarterly "This book stands easily among the best of the 'native' autobiographies. Narrated by a thoughtful and articulate Navajo leader over a span of eighteen years, this life history is brought into English with none of the selective romanticizing that has spoiled some books. . . . [It is] a superb job of bringing one culture ever closer to another."--Barre Tolken,Western Folklore
The essays in Indigenous Women and Work create a transnational and comparative dialogue on the history of the productive and reproductive lives and circumstances of Indigenous women from the late nineteenth century to the present in the United States, Australia, New Zealand/Aotearoa, and Canada. Surveying the spectrum of Indigenous women's lives and circumstances as workers, both waged and unwaged, the contributors offer varied perspectives on the ways women's work has contributed to the survival of communities in the face of ongoing tensions between assimilation and colonization. They also interpret how individual nations have conceived of Indigenous women as workers and, in turn, convert these assumptions and definitions into policy and practice. The essays address the intersection of Indigenous, women's, and labor history, but will also be useful to contemporary policy makers, tribal activists, and Native American women's advocacy associations. Contributors are Tracey Banivanua Mar, Marlene Brant Castellano, Cathleen D. Cahill, Brenda J. Child, Sherry Farrell Racette, Chris Friday, Aroha Harris, Faye HeavyShield, Heather A. Howard, Margaret D. Jacobs, Alice Littlefield, Cybèle Locke, Mary Jane Logan McCallum, Kathy M'Closkey, Colleen O'Neill, Beth H. Piatote, Susan Roy, Lynette Russell, Joan Sangster, Ruth Taylor, and Carol Williams.
Discusses the history, culture, beliefs, changing ways, and notable people of the Navajo.
The Navajo people of Canyon de Chelly must negotiate a delicate balance between the old and the new as they struggle to maintain their traditional ways of life in the midst of archaeologists, U.S. Park Service employees, and the increasing numbers of tourists who come to visit this hauntingly beautiful part of northeastern Arizona. Anthropologist-writer Jeanne Simonelli, who worked at Canyon de Chelly as a seasonal park ranger, interweaves stories of her personal experiences and friendships with canyon residents with discussions of native history and culture in the region. Focusing on the members of one extended Navajo family, Simonelli describes the small moments of their daily lives: shearing goats, baking bread, attending a solemn all-night health ceremony, washing clothes at the local laundromat, playing traditional games and contemporary sports, talking about the history of the Dinthe Navajo peopleand pondering the changes they have witnessed in the canyon and the difficulties they confront. Crossing Between Worlds is sumptuously illustrated with insightful black-and-white photographs that document the everyday activities of Navajo families in one of the most spectacular corners of the American Southwest.
Handbook of Restorative Justice is a collection of original, cutting-edge essays that offer an insightful and critical assessment of the theory, principles and practices of restorative justice around the globe. This much-awaited volume is a response to the cry of students, scholars and practitioners of restorative justice, for a comprehensive resource about a practice that is radically transforming the way the human community responds to loss, trauma and harm. Its diverse essays not only explore the various methods of responding nonviolently to harms-done by persons, groups, global corporations and nation-states, but also examine the dimensions of restorative justice in relation to criminology, victimology, traumatology and feminist studies. In addition. They contain prescriptions for how communities might re-structure their family, school and workplace life according to restorative values. This Handbook is an essential tool for every serious student of criminal, social and restorative justice.
List of charter members of the society: v. 1, p. 98-99.
How Navajos navigate the complex world of medicine Surgery, blood transfusions, CPR, and organ transplantation are common biomedical procedures for treating trauma and disease. But for Navajo Indians, these treatments can conflict with their traditional understanding of health and well-being. This book investigates how Navajos navigate their medically and religiously pluralistic world while coping with illness. Focusing on Navajo attitudes toward invasive procedures, Maureen Trudelle Schwarz reveals the ideological conflicts experienced by Navajo patients and the reasons behind the choices they make to promote their own health and healing. Schwarz has conducted extensive interviews with patients, traditional herbalists and ceremonial practitioners, and members of Native American Church and Christian denominations to reveal the variety of perspectives toward biomedicine that prevail on the reservation and to show how each group within the tribe copes with health-related issues. She describes how Navajos interpret numerous health issues in terms of local understanding, drawing on both their own and biomedical or Christian traditions. She also provides insight into how Navajos use ceremonial practice and prayer to deal with the consequences of amputation or transplantation.
West of the Four Corners and east of the Colorado River, in southeastern Utah, a unique one-hundred-mile-long, two-hundred-foot-high, serrated cliff cuts the sky. Whether viewed as barrier wall or sheltering sanctuary, Comb Ridge has helped define life and culture in this region for thousands of years. Today, the area it crosses is still relatively remote, though an important part of a scenic complex of popular tourist destinations that includes Natural Bridges National Monument and Grand Gulch just to the west, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Lake Powell a bit farther west, Canyonlands National Park to the north, Hovenweep National Monument to the east, and the San Juan River and Monument Valley to the south. Prehistorically Comb Ridge split an intensively used Ancient Puebloan homeland. It later had similar cultural—both spiritual and practical—significance to Utes, Paiutes, and Navajos and played a crucial role in the history of European American settlement. To tell the story of this rock that is unlike any other rock in the world and the diverse people whose lives it has affected, Robert S. McPherson, author of multiple books on Navajos and on the Four Corners region, draws on the findings of a major, federally funded project to research the cultural history of Comb Ridge. He carries the story forward to contention over present and future uses of Comb Ridge and the spectacular country surrounding it.
In 1882 President Chester A. Arthur signed an executive order that created a joint-occupation reservation for both Hopis and western Navajos in present-day Arizona. This policy was the start of a century-long land dispute between the two tribes. The Navajo-Hopi Land Dispute recounts the origins and history of the legal battle between the two peoples for control of the 1882 reservation, focusing on the federal court case, Healing v. Jones, in which the author served as a consultant for the Navajo Nation. Although the federal government wanted to relocate impoverished Navajos from the disputed land, Brugge firmly believed that a fair court hearing would reinforce the Navajo claim. His account of Healing vs. Jones - events leading to the case, the court case itself, and the aftermath of the judge's decision - tries to balance the extreme positions staked out by advocates for the Hopis and the Navajos. Brugge argues that, to this day, the Navajos suffer stereotyping and prejudice, both of which were decisive in the tragic outcome of the legal battle. Lawyers for the Hopis, he contends, exploited ethnic hatred to the benefit of their client tribe and to the detriment of the Navajos.
Hardcover, 319 pages, 2,000 color and historic b & w illustrations; Featuring Navajo blankets & rugs, Pueblo textiles, Cherokee, Alaskan Native and other tribes, ca. 1850 to present. Dimensions (in inches): 11.50 x 1.00 x 8.75 Vol. 3 - "American Indian Art Series." REVIEWS: ***** "The Bible of Native Arts!" Native Peoples Magazine "The volume will for decades remain a primary resource." Dr. Bruce Bernstain, Smithsonian Institutiton, National Museum of the American Indian "We applaud the efforts of Dr. Gregory Schaaf in his American Indian Art Series." Susan Pourian, The Indian Craft Shop, Department of Interior "THE reference books for Indian art." Isa and Dick Diestler

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