Tourism has become increasingly shaped by neoliberal policies, yet the consequences of this neoliberalisation are relatively under-explored. This book provides a wide-ranging inquiry into the particular manifestations of different variants of neoliberalism, highlighting its uneven geographical development and the changing dynamics of neoliberal policies in order to explain and evaluate the effects of neoliberal processes on tourism. Covering a variety of different aspects of neoliberalism and tourism, the chapters investigate how different types of tourism are used as part of more general neoliberalisation agendas, how neoliberalism differs according to the geographic context, the importance of discourse in shaping neoliberal practices and the different approaches of putting the neoliberal ideology into practice. Aiming to initiate debates about the connections between neoliberalism and tourism and advance further research avenues, this book makes a timely contribution which discusses the relationships between markets, nation-states and societies from a social science perspective. Neoliberalism is considered as a political-economic ideology, as variants of the global neoliberal project, as discourse and practices through which neoliberalism is enacted.
The SAGE Handbook of Tourism Management is a critical, authoritative review of tourism management, written by leading international thinkers and academics in the field. Arranged over two volumes, the chapters are framed as critical synoptic pieces covering key developments, current issues and debates, and emerging trends and future considerations for the field. The two volumes focus in turn on the theories, concepts and disciplines that underpin tourism management in volume one, followed by examinations of how those ideas and concepts have been applied in the second volume. Chapters are structured around twelve key themes: Volume One Part One: Researching Tourism Part Two: Social Analysis Part Three: Economic Analysis Part Four: Technological Analysis Part Five: Environmental Analysis Part Six: Political Analysis Volume Two Part One: Approaching Tourism Part Two: Destination Applications Part Three: Marketing Applications Part Four: Tourism Product Markets Part Five: Technological Applications Part Six: Environmental Applications This handbook offers a fresh, contemporary and definitive look at tourism management, making it an essential resource for academics, researchers and students.
The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Tourism presents a collection of readings that represent an essential and authoritative reference on the state-of-the-art of the interdisciplinary field of tourism studies. Presents a comprehensive and critical overview of tourism studies across the social sciences Introduces emerging topics and reassesses key themes in tourism studies in the light of recent developments Includes 50 newly commissioned essays by leading experts in the social sciences from around the world Contains cutting-edge perspectives on topics that include tourism’s role in globalization, sustainable tourism, and the state’s role in tourism development Sets an agenda for future tourism research and includes a wealth of bibliographic references
This volume explores the links between the rapidly growing phenomenon of social entrepreneurship (SE) and the international tourism and hospitality industry. This unique industry is particularly ripe for transformation by SE and the book’s authors delve deeply into the reasons for this. The book has three parts. The first creates a conceptual and theoretical framework for understanding the uniqueness of SE in the tourism context. The second examines different communities of practice where SE is being applied in tourism. The third is a rich collection of case studies from eight countries where tourism SE is already having an impact. The book’s authors address the topic from many different angles, disciplinary backgrounds and geographic areas. Many case study authors are practicing social entrepreneurs who share their successes, challenges and experience with tourism-related projects. The book also proposes a research agenda and educational programmatic changes needed to support tourism SE. As these are developed, tourism SE will bring innovation to destinations, transformation of their economic and social structures, and contribution to a better world. The book has many insights and resources for scholars and practitioners alike to usher in this transformation.
This book examines the challenges facing the development of tourism in the six member states of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC): Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). This region, which largely comprises the Arabian Peninsula, possesses some of the fastest growing economies in the world and is remarkably unique. It shares similar associations and affinities: tribal histories, royal kinship, political associations, Bedu cultural roots, Islamic heritage, rapid urbanization, oil wealth, rentier dynamics, state capitalist structures, migrant labour, economic diversification policies and institutional restructuring. Therefore, this volume takes the study of tourism away from its normative unit of analysis, where tourism in the region is being examined within the context of the Middle East and the wider Islamic and Arab world, towards an enquiry focusing on a specific geo-political territory and socially defined region. Although international tourism development in the region embodies a range of challenges, complexities and conflicts, which are deeply contextualized in this volume, the approach overall does not endorse the normative ‘Gulf bashing’ position that has predominated within the critical enquiries in the region. It presents a forward-looking and realistic assessment of international tourism development, examining development potentialities and constructive ways forward for GCC states and the region as a whole. This edited volume provides a real attempt to examine critically ways in which tourism and its development intersect with the socio-cultural, economic, political, environmental and industrial change that is taking place in the region. By doing so, the book provides a theoretically engaged analysis of the social transformations and discourses that shape our contemporary understanding of tourism development within the GCC region. Moreover, it deciphers tourism development’s role within the context of the GCC states undergoing rapid transformation, urbanization, ultra-modernization, internationalization and globalization. In addition to state-specific illustrations and destination case studies, the work provides insights into relatable themes associated with international tourism development in the region, such as tourism’s relationship with religion, heritage and identity, the environment and sustainability, mobility and cross-border movements, the transport industry, image production and destination branding, mega-development and political stability and instability. The book combines theory with diverse case study illustrations, drawing on disciplinary knowledge from such fields as sociology, political economy and social geography. This timely and original contribution is essential reading for students, researchers and academics in the field of tourism studies and related subject areas, along with those who have regional interests in Middle East studies, including Gulf and Arabian Peninsula studies.
Illustrating the role of power and power relations in tourism encounters within different political, economic, environmental and cultural contexts, the authors in this anthology analyse, theoretically and empirically, the implications of the privileging of some moralities at the expense of others. Key themes include the moral consumption of tourism experiences, embodiment in tourism encounters, environmental moralities as well as methodological aspects of morality in tourism research. Crossing disciplinary and chronological boundaries, Moral Encounters in Tourism provides a much-anticipated overview of this new interdisciplinary terrain and offers possible routes for new research on the intersection of morality and tourism studies.
Travel and tourism have a long association with the notion of transformation, both in terms of self and social collectives. What is surprising, however, is that this association has, on the whole, remained relatively underexplored and unchallenged, with little in the way of a corpus of academic literature surrounding these themes. Instead, much of the literature to date has focused upon describing and categorising tourism and travel experiences from a supply-side perspective, with travellers themselves defined in terms of their motivations and interests. While the tourism field can lay claim to several significant milestone contributions, there have been few recent attempts at a rigorous re-theorization of the issues arising from the travel/transformation nexus. The opportunity to explore the socio-cultural dimensions of transformation through travel has thus far been missed. Bringing together geographers, sociologists, cultural researchers, philosophers, anthropologists, visual researchers, literary scholars and heritage researchers, this volume explores what it means to transform through travel in a modern, mobile world. In doing so, it draws upon a wide variety of traveller perspectives - including tourists, backpackers, lifestyle travellers, migrants, refugees, nomads, walkers, writers, poets, virtual travellers and cosmetic surgery patients - to unpack a cultural phenomenon that has captured the imagination since the very first works of Western literature.
CSA Sociological Abstracts abstracts and indexes the international literature in sociology and related disciplines in the social and behavioral sciences. The database provides abstracts of journal articles and citations to book reviews drawn from over 1,800+ serials publications, and also provides abstracts of books, book chapters, dissertations, and conference papers.
Die Konstruktion von Tourismusräumen ist von verschiedenen gesellschaftlichen und kulturellen Prozessen begleitet. Welche Räume der Wahrnehmung, Nutzung und Aneignung werden dabei hergestellt? Wie gestaltet sich die soziale und kulturelle Produktion von Tourismusräumen? Die Beiträge dieses Bandes nähern sich diesen Fragen anhand unterschiedlicher gegenstandsbezogener Analysen. Zugleich wird aus kulturgeographischer und kulturwissenschaftlicher Perspektive das Potenzial der unterschiedlichen »Cultural Turns« für die empirische Analyse tourismusbezogener Fragestellungen ausgelotet.
»Entzauberung« ist ein Schlüsselbegriff im Selbstverständnis der Moderne. Doch worum handelt es sich dabei eigentlich? Was genau meinte Max Weber damit? Und sind seine kanonisch gewordenen Vorstellungen überhaupt haltbar beziehungsweise: Sind sie alternativlos? Die Macht des Heiligen ist der Versuch, »Entzauberung« zu entzaubern. Dazu widmet sich Hans Joas zunächst exemplarischen Fällen der wissenschaftlichen Beschäftigung mit Religion seit dem 18. Jahrhundert. In direkter Auseinandersetzung mit Weber entfaltet er sodann den Grundriss einer Theorie, die dem machtstützenden Potenzial von Religion ebenso gerecht werden kann wie dem machtkritischen. An die Stelle des Geschichtsbilds vom unaufhaltsam fortschreitenden Prozess der Entzauberung tritt die Konzeption eines Spannungsfelds zwischen Dynamiken der Sakralisierung, ihrer reflexiven Brechung und den Gefahren ihrer Aneignung in Prozessen der Machtbildung. Das beinhaltet Zumutungen – für Gläubige ebenso wie für säkulare Geister.
Eine grundlegende und umfassende Einführung in die modernen Strömungen der politischen Philosophie: Utilitarismus, Liberalismus, Libertarismus, Marxismus, Kommunitarismus und Feminismus.
Im ökonomischen Boom der Nachkriegsjahrzehnte wuchs die Bedeutung des Öls für das Funktionieren moderner Wirtschafts- und Gesellschaftsordnungen und damit auch für die Legitimität liberal-demokratischer Staatsgebilde. Als die OPEC im Oktober 1973 den Ölpreis drastisch erhöhte und die OAPEC die Öllieferung beschränkte, um Druck im Nahostkonflikt auszuüben, kam dies weder plötzlich noch überraschend, zeigte aber in aller Deutlichkeit, dass die Politik in Westeuropa und den USA von einer Grundlage abhing, die sie selbst nicht kontrollieren konnte. Regierungen begegneten dieser Herausforderung ihrer Souveränität mit einem Ensemble von nationalen und internationalen Maßnahmen vom Ausbau des ölbezogenen Wissens, des Petroknowledge, über die Umstrukturierung der Energiesektoren bis zu diplomatischen Initiativen, um die Welt des Öls neu zu ordnen. Die Untersuchung dieser souveränitätspolitischen Strategien und ihrer medialen Kommunikation verortet die Ölkrise in den Transformationsprozessen der 1970er Jahre und legt zugleich deren historiographische Neubewertung als Beginn unserer Zeit nahe.
Der Sammelband liefert Befunde zu aktuellen Forschungsfeldern der (Un-)Sicherheit und Kriminalprävention in europäischen Städten. So lässt sich beobachten, dass insbesondere genuin urbane Formen abweichenden Verhaltens und abweichender Situationen zunehmend problematisiert, kriminalisiert und sanktioniert werden. Die klassisch europäische Utopie von Stadt als Möglichkeitsraum scheint so sukzessive ad absurdum geführt und durch eine Utopie der Sicherheit in prinzipiell unsicheren Räumen ersetzt zu werden. Neben ihrer wissenschaftlichen Bedeutung sind die Ergebnisse der vorliegenden Beiträge vor allem für Praxisfelder relevant, die sich mit den Bereichen (Un-)Sicherheit, Kriminalität und Kriminalprävention in städtischen Räumen auseinandersetzen.
Die Vorlesungen, die Michel Foucault in den Jahren 1979 und 1980 am Collège de France gehalten hat, haben in seinem Werk eine Scharnierfunktion. Nach der Untersuchung der politischen Wahrheitsregime, die im Zentrum der großen Vorlesungen zur Gouvernementalität standen, treten hier nun die ethischen Wahrheitsregime, die Selbsttechnologien, ganz in den Fokus von Foucaults Forschungen. Ein Thema, das ihn bis zu seinem Tod beschäftigt hat. Wie kommt es, so Foucaults zentrale Frage, dass in der christlich-abendländischen Kultur von den Menschen nicht mehr nur Akte des Gehorsams und der Unterwerfung, sondern auch ”Akte der Wahrheit“, des Wahrsprechens über sich selbst, über ihre Fehler, Wünsche und den Zustand ihrer Seele, verlangt werden? Zur Beantwortung dieser Frage unterzieht Foucault zunächst Sophokles' König Ödipus einer neuen Lektüre, wendet sich aber dann dem Urchristentum und dessen Praktiken der Taufe, Gewissensprüfung und Buße zu. In diesen Ritualen wird eine pastorale Ökonomie sichtbar, die um das öffentliche Geständnis kreist. Im Gegensatz zu dieser Ethik der Reinigung war die antike, heidnische Moral noch durch eine ”Kunst der Existenz“ bestimmt, wie sich in einem abschließenden Vergleich zeigt. Mit Die Regierung der Lebenden liegen nun Foucaults erste Untersuchungen zu diesen Fragen der Ethik und Ästhetik der Existenz vor, die den fulminanten Auftakt zu seinem Spätwerk bilden.

Best Books