While historical and protected landscapes have been well studied for years, the cultural significance of ordinary landscapes is now increasingly recognised. This groundbreaking book discusses how contemporary cultural landscapes can be, and are, created and recognised. The book challenges common concepts of cultural landscapes as protected or ‘special’ landscapes that include significant buildings or features. Using case studies from around the world it questions the usual measures of judgement related to cultural landscapes and instead focuses on landscapes that are created, planned or simply evolve as a result of changing human cultures, management policy and practice. Each contribution analyses the geographical and human background of the landscape, and policies and management strategies that impact upon it, and defines the meanings of 'cultural landscape' in its particular context. Taken together they establish a new paradigm in the study of landscapes in all forms.
Making sense of new cultural economies, it is argued, needs consistent attention to the resonances of individual lives. Otherwise, a discussion of cultural economies remains suspended in a detached virtualism (Miller, 2000). The idea of the remaking of geographies and cultural economies remains, necessarily, a consistent search to make the subject dynamic in its resonance with the contemporary world. In recent debates concerning the reframing of the cultural economies of geography, there is an evidence of increasing acknowledgement of the overlooked importance of subjectivities within geographical explanation. This has often been difficult when trying to attend to the large scale apparent dynamics of change. The shift of geographies to focus upon cultural economies combines two profound threads that inform this chapter: the acknowledgement of the breadth and inclusivity of what economies are and the refusal mutually to isolate the cultural and the economic. Thus the economic becomes engaged and even framed in relation to the cultural, and vice versa. Such an appraisal makes more robust the limits of ‘either – or’ claims from these two grounding components of geographical thinking and its representation of the world. These themes are sustained in different ways across the chapters of this book. This chapter seeks to build a critical discourse concerning space, embodied practice and lay knowledge. It does this in order to address the mechanisms through which individuals are engaged in the processes of new cultural economies.
New approaches to both cultural landscapes and historic urban landscapes increasingly recognize the need to guide future change, rather than simply protecting the fabric of the past. Challenging traditional notions of historic preservation, Conserving Cultural Landscapes takes a dynamic multifaceted approach to conservation. It builds on the premise that a successful approach to urban and cultural landscape conservation recognizes cultural as well as natural values, sustains traditional connections to place, and engages people in stewardship where they live and work. It brings together academics within the humanities and humanistic social sciences, conservation and preservation professionals, practitioners, and stakeholders to rethink the meaning and practice of cultural heritage conservation, encourage international cooperation, and stimulate collaborative research and scholarship.
The cultural landscapes of Central European cities reflect over half a century of socialism and are marked by the Marxists' vision of a utopian landscape. Architecture, urban planning and the visual arts were considered to be powerful means of expressing the 'people's power'. However, since the velvet revolutions of 1989, this urban scenery has been radically transformed by new forces and trends, infused by the free market, democracy and liberalization. This has led to 'landscape cleansing' and 'recycling', as these former communist nations used new architectural, functional and social forms to transform their urbanscapes, their meanings and uses. Comparing case studies from different post-socialist cities, this book examines the culturally conditional variations between local powers and structures despite the similarities in the general processes and systems. It considers the contemporary cultural landscapes of these post-socialist cities as a dynamic fusion of the old communist forms and new free-market meanings, features and democratic practices, of global influences and local icons. The book assesses whether these urbanscapes clearly reflect the social, cultural and political conditions and aspirations of these transitional countries and so a critical analysis of them provides important insights.
The research project conducted fieldwork in a number of case studies in metropolitan and regional and rural areas of New South Wales and Victoria in order to investigate and explore the intersection between traditional and new cultural landscape precincts and the current and future patterns of Australian tourism. Cultural landscapes of tourism are diverse in character. This project compared the more `traditional¿ cultural tourist precinct of Sydney¿s Art Gallery of New South Wales and Woolloomooloo Finger Wharf with the cosmopolitan cultural diversity of ethnic precincts including Sydney¿s and Melbourne¿s Chinatown and Melbourne¿s Little Italy, Lygon Street. This title is also available for FREE download at www.crctourism.com.au
First published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Written by leading international tourism researchers, this book examines the key trends in European tourism planning and organisation. It introduces a theoretical framework to tourism planning and organisation using a procedural and structural approach. It also identifies leading and emerging practices and offers a new vision for European tourism planning.
There has been a proliferation in recent scholarship of studies of monuments and their histories and of theoretical positions that shed light on aspects of their meanings. However, just as monuments mark their territory by attempting to ensure the existence of boundaries, sothese discourses set a boundary between their authority as platforms on which the interpretation of monumental space occurs and, in this respect, the different authority of the novel. This study crosses this boundary by means of dynamic interdisciplinary movements between selected novels by James Joyce, Yukio Mishima, Rashid al-Daif, and Orhan Pamuk, on the one hand, and various theoretical perspectives,history, and cultural geography, on the other. Through the specific choice of literary texts that represent monumental space in a typical post-imperial geopolitical contexts, Monumental Space and the Post-Imperial Novel brings into question many postcolonial paradigms. Sakr establishes a two-way interpretive methodology between theory, history,and cultural geography and the novel that serves as the groundwork for innovative interdisciplinary readings of monumental space.
Archaeology has been an important source of metaphors for some of the key intellectuals of the 20th century: Sigmund Freud, Walter Benjamin, Alois Riegl and Michel Foucault, amongst many others. However, this power has also turned against archaeology, because the discipline has been dealt with perfunctorily as a mere provider of metaphors that other intellectuals have exploited. Scholars from different fields continue to explore areas in which archaeologists have been working for over two centuries, with little or no reference to the discipline. It seems that excavation, stratigraphy or ruins only become important at a trans-disciplinary level when people from outside archaeology pay attention to them and somehow dematerialize them. Meanwhile, archaeologists have been usually more interested in borrowing theories from other fields, rather than in developing the theoretical potential of the same concepts that other thinkers find so useful. The time is ripe for archaeologists to address a wider audience and engage in theoretical debates from a position of equality, not of subalternity. Reclaiming Archaeology explores how archaeology can be useful to rethink modernity’s big issues, and more specifically late modernity (broadly understood as the 20th and 21st centuries). The book contains a series of original essays, not necessarily following the conventional academic rules of archaeological writing or thinking, allowing rhetoric to have its place in disclosing the archaeological. In each of the four sections that constitute this book (method, time, heritage and materiality), the contributors deal with different archaeological tropes, such as excavation, surface/depth, genealogy, ruins, fragments, repressed memories and traces. They criticize their modernist implications and rework them in creative ways, in order to show the power of archaeology not just to understand the past, but also the present. Reclaiming Archaeology includes essays from a diverse array of archaeologists who have dealt in one way or another with modernity, including scholars from non-Anglophone countries who have approached the issue in original ways during recent years, as well as contributors from other fields who engage in a creative dialogue with archaeology and the work of archaeologists.
The study of landscape and place has become an increasingly fertile realm of inquiry in the humanities and social sciences. In this new book of essays, selected from presentations at the first annual meeting of the Society for Philosophy and Geography, scholars investigate the experiences and meanings that inscribe urban and suburban landscapes. Gary Backhaus and John Murungi bring philosophy and geography into a dialogue with a host of other disciplines to explore a fundamental dialectic: while our collective and personal activity modifies the landscape, in turn, the landscape modifies human identities, and social and environmental relations. Whether proposing a peripatetic politics, conducting a sociological analysis of building security systems, or critically examining the formation of New York City's municipal parks, each essay sheds distinctive light on this fascinating and engaging aspect of contemporary environmental studies.
This book presents new directions both for tourism and cultural landscape studies in geography, crossing the traditional boundaries between the research of geographers and scholars of the tourism industry. Drawing on selected research from Europe, Southeast Asia, the Pacific and North America, the contributors combine perspectives in human geography and tourism to present cultural landscapes of tourist destinations as socially constructed places, examining the extent and manner by which tourism both establishes and falsifies local reality. The book addresses many critical themes which recent critiques in tourism studies focusing on the attitudes and behaviour of the tourist and on the industry as agents of social change have ignored, including the marginalization of the 'host' community, the privatization and commodification of local culture, and how tourism acts as both agent and process in the structure, identity and meaning of local places.
This book investigates the newly emerging interest to investigate and preserve cultural landscapes. It presents the historic, archaeological, ethnographic, and environmental traditions of cultural landscape study and the attempts to reconstruct and analyze the complex processes of cultural changes. It points to the benefits of interdisciplinary cooperation, which should involve an ecological approach with historical ecology, applied archaeology, and environmental planning.
The study of Irish history, once riven and constricted, has recently enjoyed a resurgence, with new practitioners, new approaches, and new methods of investigation. The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History represents the diversity of this emerging talent and achievement by bringing together 36 leading scholars of modern Ireland and embracing 400 years of Irish history, uniting early and late modernists as well as contemporary historians. The Handbook offers a set of scholarly perspectives drawn from numerous disciplines, including history, political science, literature, geography, and the Irish language. It looks at the Irish at home as well as in their migrant and diasporic communities. The Handbook combines sets of wide thematic and interpretative essays, with more detailed investigations of particular periods. Each of the contributors offers a summation of the state of scholarship within their subject area, linking their own research insights with assessments of future directions within the discipline. In its breadth and depth and diversity, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History offers an authoritative and vibrant portrayal of the history of modern Ireland.
The fascinating story of what happened to one community after the Europeans came. It places the conflict over land and the impact on the Aborigines' sense of place in the context of changing lifestyles. As well as exploring the past, this book demonstrates the importance of the past in shaping the present.
In questo lavoro “Progettare Paesaggio, Landscape as Infrastructure” si confrontano: da un lato le stimolanti proposte progettuali redatte dal gruppo di studenti della Harvard Graduate School of Design guidati dalla docente Paola Cannavò; dall’altro l’analisi del territorio portuense ed ostiense e delle possibili future trasformazioni del contesto paesaggistico determinate dai progetti infrastrutturali, in fase di realizzazione o di valutazione, con ipotesi di linee guida per la riqualificazione e la valorizzazione di questa area, intesa come complesso palinsesto storico e paesaggistico, al fine di rendere evidenti le modalità procedurali di quella reale tutela attiva e dinamica del paesaggio affidata al Ministero per i beni e le attività culturali e da sempre svolta. [ANTONIA P. RECCHIA – Direttore Generale, Direzione Generale per il paesaggio, le belle arti, l’architettura e l’arte contemporanee, MiBAC] The project “Progettare Paesaggio, Landscape as Architecture” combines the inspiring design proposals drafted by a group of students of the Harvard Graduate School of Design headed by the teacher Paola Cannavò with a study of the portuense and ostiense areas and how the landscape might change due to the construction of new infrastructure, either being completed or in the design stage. The study includes guidelines for the requalification and enhancement of the area considered as a complex historical landscape; it also highlights the past and present active and dynamic protection measures and procedures adopted by the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities. [ANTONIA P. RECCHIA – Director General, Directorate General for the landscape, fine arts, architecture and contemporary art, MiBAC] “Questa pubblicazione e la ricerca progettuale qui documentata, propongono una opportuna testimonianza delle sfide contemporanee della forma urbana, del processo ecologico e dello sviluppo economico affrontato dalla capitale italiana.” “Evidenziando gli impulsi complessi e contraddittori di tipo ecologico ed economico di un paesaggio portuale attivo, Cannavò propone un nuovo ruolo chiave per l’architettura del paesaggio come strumento urbanistico. Così facendo promuove una posizione italiana all’interno del dibattito contemporaneo sul Landscape Urbanism e l’Ecological Urbanism fornendo al contempo una prospettiva futura per l’urbanistica, anche nell’area di Fiumicino.” [CHARLES WALDHEIM – Direttore, Dipartimento di Architettura del Paesaggio, Harvard Graduate School of Design] “This publication, and the design research that it documents, offers timely evidence of the contemporary challenges of urban form, ecological process, and economic development faced by the Italian capital.” “Highlighting the complex and contradictory ecological and economic impulses of a working port landscape, Cannavò proposes a renewed relevance for landscape architecture as a medium of urbanism. In so doing, she stakes an Italian position in the contemporary discourses of landscape urbanism and ecological urbanism, while pointing to a way forward for urbanism, even in the fields of Fuimicino.” [CHARLES WALDHEIM – Chair, Department of Landscape Architecture, Harvard Graduate School of Design]
Cultural landscapes are usually understood within physical geography as those transformed by human action. As human influence on the earth increases, advances in palaeocological reconstruction have also allowed for new interpretations of the evidence for the earliest human impacts on the environment. It is essential that such evidence is examined in the context of modern trends in social sciences and humanities. This stimulating new book argues that convergence of the two approaches can provide a more holistic understanding of long-term physical and human processes. Split into two major sections, this book attempts to bridge the gap between the sciences and humanities. The first section, provides an analysis of the methodological tools employed in examining processes of environmental change. Empirical research in the fields of palaecology and Quaternary studies is combined with the latest theoretical views of nature and landscape occurring in cultural geography, archaeology and anthropology. The author examines the way in which environmental management decisions are made. The book then moves on to discuss the relevance of this perspective to contemporary issues through a wide variety of international case studies, including World Heritage protection, landscape preservation, indigenous people and cultural tourism.
The European Landscape is under stress of changing land use and a changing attitude of its users. Globalization, the disappearance of the iron curtain and the recent EU enlargement to 25 countries have changed the economic and environmental dimensions of Europe. Europe is changing its face from a western and eastern part to one European Union and to fast connections between its centres of activity. The rural and cultural heritage of Europe has to be adapted to cope with this change. However, its landscape is worth to be conserved as well, because it represents the European history in the same way as castles and churches. It even more represents the history of the common people, because it has been the tradition of the rural population that made these landscapes. It cannot be prevented that Europe is changing and it is good that Europe adapts to the new dimensions of the world. We, in Europe, have to define what we think is important and what must be conserved, what can be adapted to be used for new functions and what can be abolished because it has no value. These decisions will determine the new dimensions of the European landscapes. The Frontis Workshop on the New Dimensions of the European Landscape was held on 10-12 June 2002. Wageningen University and Research Centre organized this workshop aiming to develop visions on the landscape in Europe, its development and design in the future and to strengthen the international network in landscape planning.
The book's aim is to present recommendations for sustainable land use and management. The authors follow a hierarchical approach that is inherent in landscape structures and processes as well as in planning practice. During the last decades, landscape ecology has developed tremendously. Future research tendencies are also covered. All methodological approaches are explained with examples from different regions.

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