An application of the techniques of dynamical systems and bifurcation theories to the study of nonlinear oscillations. Taking their cue from Poincare, the authors stress the geometrical and topological properties of solutions of differential equations and iterated maps. Numerous exercises, some of which require nontrivial algebraic manipulations and computer work, convey the important analytical underpinnings of problems in dynamical systems and help readers develop an intuitive feel for the properties involved.
An application of the techniques of dynamical systems and bifurcation theories to the study of nonlinear oscillations. Taking their cue from Poincare, the authors stress the geometrical and topological properties of solutions of differential equations and iterated maps. Numerous exercises, some of which require nontrivial algebraic manipulations and computer work, convey the important analytical underpinnings of problems in dynamical systems and help readers develop an intuitive feel for the properties involved.
This volume is an introduction to applied nonlinear dynamics and chaos. The emphasis is on teaching the techniques and ideas that will enable students to take specific dynamical systems and obtain some quantitative information about their behavior. The new edition has been updated and extended throughout, and contains an extensive bibliography and a detailed glossary of terms.
The study of nonlinear dynamical systems has exploded in the past 25 years, and Robert L. Devaney has made these advanced research developments accessible to undergraduate and graduate mathematics students as well as researchers in other disciplines with the introduction of this widely praised book. In this second edition of his best-selling text, Devaney includes new material on the orbit diagram fro maps of the interval and the Mandelbrot set, as well as striking color photos illustrating both Julia and Mandelbrot sets. This book assumes no prior acquaintance with advanced mathematical topics such as measure theory, topology, and differential geometry. Assuming only a knowledge of calculus, Devaney introduces many of the basic concepts of modern dynamical systems theory and leads the reader to the point of current research in several areas.
This book treats nonlinear dynamics in both Hamiltonian and dissipative systems. The emphasis is on the mechanics for generating chaotic motion, methods of calculating the transitions from regular to chaotic motion, and the dynamical and statistical properties of the dynamics when it is chaotic. The new edition brings the subject matter in a rapidly expanding field up to date, and has greatly expanded the treatment of dissipative dynamics to include most important subjects.
In the past three decades, bifurcation theory has matured into a well-established and vibrant branch of mathematics. This book gives a unified presentation in an abstract setting of the main theorems in bifurcation theory, as well as more recent and lesser known results. It covers both the local and global theory of one-parameter bifurcations for operators acting in infinite-dimensional Banach spaces, and shows how to apply the theory to problems involving partial differential equations. In addition to existence, qualitative properties such as stability and nodal structure of bifurcating solutions are treated in depth. This volume will serve as an important reference for mathematicians, physicists, and theoretically-inclined engineers working in bifurcation theory and its applications to partial differential equations. The second edition is substantially and formally revised and new material is added. Among this is bifurcation with a two-dimensional kernel with applications, the buckling of the Euler rod, the appearance of Taylor vortices, the singular limit process of the Cahn-Hilliard model, and an application of this method to more complicated nonconvex variational problems.
This book is a revised and updated version, including a substantial portion of new material, of J. D. Cole's text Perturbation Methods in Applied Mathe matics, Ginn-Blaisdell, 1968. We present the material at a level which assumes some familiarity with the basics of ordinary and partial differential equations. Some of the more advanced ideas are reviewed as needed; therefore this book can serve as a text in either an advanced undergraduate course or a graduate level course on the subject. The applied mathematician, attempting to understand or solve a physical problem, very often uses a perturbation procedure. In doing this, he usually draws on a backlog of experience gained from the solution of similar examples rather than on some general theory of perturbations. The aim of this book is to survey these perturbation methods, especially in connection with differ ential equations, in order to illustrate certain general features common to many examples. The basic ideas, however, are also applicable to integral equations, integrodifferential equations, and even to_difference equations. In essence, a perturbation procedure consists of constructing the solution for a problem involving a small parameter B, either in the differential equation or the boundary conditions or both, when the solution for the limiting case B = 0 is known. The main mathematical tool used is asymptotic expansion with respect to a suitable asymptotic sequence of functions of B.
The book discusses continuous and discrete systems in systematic and sequential approaches for all aspects of nonlinear dynamics. The unique feature of the book is its mathematical theories on flow bifurcations, oscillatory solutions, symmetry analysis of nonlinear systems and chaos theory. The logically structured content and sequential orientation provide readers with a global overview of the topic. A systematic mathematical approach has been adopted, and a number of examples worked out in detail and exercises have been included. Chapters 1–8 are devoted to continuous systems, beginning with one-dimensional flows. Symmetry is an inherent character of nonlinear systems, and the Lie invariance principle and its algorithm for finding symmetries of a system are discussed in Chap. 8. Chapters 9–13 focus on discrete systems, chaos and fractals. Conjugacy relationship among maps and its properties are described with proofs. Chaos theory and its connection with fractals, Hamiltonian flows and symmetries of nonlinear systems are among the main focuses of this book. Over the past few decades, there has been an unprecedented interest and advances in nonlinear systems, chaos theory and fractals, which is reflected in undergraduate and postgraduate curricula around the world. The book is useful for courses in dynamical systems and chaos, nonlinear dynamics, etc., for advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students in mathematics, physics and engineering.
Given the ease with which computers can do iteration it is now possible for almost anyone to generate beautiful images whose roots lie in discrete dynamical systems. Images of Mandelbrot and Julia sets abound in publications both mathematical and not. The mathematics behind the pictures are beautiful in their own right and are the subject of this text. Mathematica programs that illustrate the dynamics are included in an appendix.
Algebraic, differential, and integral equations are used in the applied sciences, en gineering, economics, and the social sciences to characterize the current state of a physical, economic, or social system and forecast its evolution in time. Generally, the coefficients of and/or the input to these equations are not precisely known be cause of insufficient information, limited understanding of some underlying phe nomena, and inherent randonmess. For example, the orientation of the atomic lattice in the grains of a polycrystal varies randomly from grain to grain, the spa tial distribution of a phase of a composite material is not known precisely for a particular specimen, bone properties needed to develop reliable artificial joints vary significantly with individual and age, forces acting on a plane from takeoff to landing depend in a complex manner on the environmental conditions and flight pattern, and stock prices and their evolution in time depend on a large number of factors that cannot be described by deterministic models. Problems that can be defined by algebraic, differential, and integral equations with random coefficients and/or input are referred to as stochastic problems. The main objective of this book is the solution of stochastic problems, that is, the determination of the probability law, moments, and/or other probabilistic properties of the state of a physical, economic, or social system. It is assumed that the operators and inputs defining a stochastic problem are specified.
Several distinctive aspects make Dynamical Systems unique, including: treating the subject from a mathematical perspective with the proofs of most of the results included providing a careful review of background materials introducing ideas through examples and at a level accessible to a beginning graduate student focusing on multidimensional systems of real variables The book treats the dynamics of both iteration of functions and solutions of ordinary differential equations. Many concepts are first introduced for iteration of functions where the geometry is simpler, but results are interpreted for differential equations. The dynamical systems approach of the book concentrates on properties of the whole system or subsets of the system rather than individual solutions. The more local theory discussed deals with characterizing types of solutions under various hypothesis, and later chapters address more global aspects.
An introduction to nonlinear differential equations which equips undergraduate students with the know-how to appreciate stability theory and bifurcation.
This textbook, now in its second edition, provides a broad introduction to both continuous and discrete dynamical systems, the theory of which is motivated by examples from a wide range of disciplines. It emphasizes applications and simulation utilizing MATLAB®, Simulink®, the Image Processing Toolbox® and the Symbolic Math toolbox®, including MuPAD. Features new to the second edition include · sections on series solutions of ordinary differential equations, perturbation methods, normal forms, Gröbner bases, and chaos synchronization; · chapters on image processing and binary oscillator computing; · hundreds of new illustrations, examples, and exercises with solutions; and · over eighty up-to-date MATLAB program files and Simulink model files available online. These files were voted MATLAB Central Pick of the Week in July 2013. The hands-on approach of Dynamical Systems with Applications using MATLAB, Second Edition, has minimal prerequisites, only requiring familiarity with ordinary differential equations. It will appeal to advanced undergraduate and graduate students, applied mathematicians, engineers, and researchers in a broad range of disciplines such as population dynamics, biology, chemistry, computing, economics, nonlinear optics, neural networks, and physics. Praise for the first edition Summing up, it can be said that this text allows the reader to have an easy and quick start to the huge field of dynamical systems theory. MATLAB/SIMULINK facilitate this approach under the aspect of learning by doing. —OR News/Operations Research Spectrum The MATLAB programs are kept as simple as possible and the author's experience has shown that this method of teaching using MATLAB works well with computer laboratory classes of small sizes.... I recommend ‘Dynamical Systems with Applications using MATLAB’ as a good handbook for a diverse readership: graduates and professionals in mathematics, physics, science and engineering. —Mathematica
In recent years, due primarily to the proliferation of computers, dynamical systems has again returned to its roots in applications. It is the aim of this book to provide undergraduate and beginning graduate students in mathematics or science and engineering with a modest foundation of knowledge. Equations in dimensions one and two constitute the majority of the text, and in particular it is demonstrated that the basic notion of stability and bifurcations of vector fields are easily explained for scalar autonomous equations. Further, the authors investigate the dynamics of planar autonomous equations where new dynamical behavior, such as periodic and homoclinic orbits appears.
Providing readers with a solid basis in dynamical systems theory, as well as explicit procedures for application of general mathematical results to particular problems, the focus here is on efficient numerical implementations of the developed techniques. The book is designed for advanced undergraduates or graduates in applied mathematics, as well as for Ph.D. students and researchers in physics, biology, engineering, and economics who use dynamical systems as model tools in their studies. A moderate mathematical background is assumed, and, whenever possible, only elementary mathematical tools are used. This new edition preserves the structure of the first while updating the context to incorporate recent theoretical developments, in particular new and improved numerical methods for bifurcation analysis.
Nonlinear dynamics and chaos involves the study of apparent random happenings within a system or process. The subject has wide applications within mathematics, engineering, physics and other physical sciences. Since the bestselling first edition was published, there has been a lot of new research conducted in the area of nonlinear dynamics and chaos. * Expands on the bestselling, highly regarded first edition * A new chapter which will cover the new research in the area since first edition * Glossary of terms and a bibliography have been added * All figures and illustrations will be 'modernised' * Comprehensive and systematic account of nonlinear dynamics and chaos, still a fast-growing area of applied mathematics * Highly illustrated * Excellent introductory text, can be used for an advanced undergraduate/graduate course text
From controlling disease outbreaks to predicting heart attacks, dynamic models are increasingly crucial for understanding biological processes. Many universities are starting undergraduate programs in computational biology to introduce students to this rapidly growing field. In Dynamic Models in Biology, the first text on dynamic models specifically written for undergraduate students in the biological sciences, ecologist Stephen Ellner and mathematician John Guckenheimer teach students how to understand, build, and use dynamic models in biology. Developed from a course taught by Ellner and Guckenheimer at Cornell University, the book is organized around biological applications, with mathematics and computing developed through case studies at the molecular, cellular, and population levels. The authors cover both simple analytic models--the sort usually found in mathematical biology texts--and the complex computational models now used by both biologists and mathematicians. Linked to a Web site with computer-lab materials and exercises, Dynamic Models in Biology is a major new introduction to dynamic models for students in the biological sciences, mathematics, and engineering.
.".. an unabridged and corrected republication of the edition originally published in the 'Wiley Series in Nonlinear Science' by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, in 1998"--Title page verso.
These notes are based on a series of lectures given in the Lefschetz Center for Dynamical Systems in the Division of Applied Mathematics at Brown University during the academic year 1978-79. The purpose of the lectures was to give an introduction to the applications of centre manifold theory to differential equations. Most of the material is presented in an informal fashion, by means of worked examples in the hope that this clarifies the use of centre manifold theory. The main application of centre manifold theory given in these notes is to dynamic bifurcation theory. Dynamic bifurcation theory is concerned with topological changes in the nature of the solutions of differential equations as para meters are varied. Such an example is the creation of periodic orbits from an equilibrium point as a parameter crosses a critical value. In certain circumstances, the application of centre manifold theory reduces the dimension of the system under investigation. In this respect the centre manifold theory plays the same role for dynamic problems as the Liapunov-Schmitt procedure plays for the analysis of static solutions. Our use of centre manifold theory in bifurcation problems follows that of Ruelle and Takens [57) and of Marsden and McCracken [51).

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