Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.
New to this expanded & updated edition are revisions of Ferguson's original material, updated bibliographies, & a fresh dicussion of first century social life, the Dead Sea Scrolls & much else.
In this study of the rabbinic heretics who believed in "Two Powers in Heaven," Alan Segal explores some relationships between rabbinic Judaism, Merkabah mysticism, and early Christianity. "Two Powers in Heaven" was a very early category of heresy. It was one of the basic categories by which the rabbis perceived the new phenomenon of Christianity and one of the central issues over which Judaism and Christianity separated. Segal reconstructs the development of the heresy through prudent dating of the stages of the rabbinic traditions. The basic heresy involved interpreting scripture to say that a principal angelic or hypostatic manifestation in heaven was equivalent to God. The earliest heretics believed in two complementary powers in heaven, while later heretics believed in two opposing powers in heaven. Segal stresses the importance of perceiving the relevance of rabbinic material for solving traditional problems of New Testament and gnostic scholarship, and at the same time maintains the necessity of reading those literatures for dating rabbinic material. Please note that "Two Powers in Heaven" was previously published by Brill in hardback, ISBN 90 04 05453 7 (no longer available).
The second volume in this two-volume work studying the initial developments of anti-Judaism within the church examines the evolution of the Christian faith in its social context as revealed by evidence such as early patristic and rabbinic writings and archaeological findings.
This edition of the Complete Works of Plotinus was the first full English translation of all Enneads. The translation follows in the footsteps of previous Platonists, such as Ficinus and Taylor, and builds on Dr. Guthrie's translations and explanations of Plotinus's master Numenius, the Pythagorean texts, the works of Proclus, etc. Dr. Guthrie's translation includes several major features that are not found elsewhere, including: 1) a reorganization of the books of the Enneads into chronological order, displaying 4 progressive stages of development; 2) a comprehensive concordance of terms and ideas; 3) an examination of Plotinic philosophy's origin, development, and destiny. The present translation "is the best for him who wishes to understand Plotinus, because it is the only edition that unscrambles, chronologically, Plotinus's 4 progressive stages of development from Porphyry's frightful hodgepodge of 9 medleys. . . . It is the most faithful version, because Dr. Guthrie's sole object was to focus the labors of the best students, Marsilius Ficinus, Mueller, Drews, Bouillet, Chaignet, Taylor, and others; but one only thing he does claim, that he has not knowingly left any obscurity. Otherwise he glories in this subservience to all the best that had been done before him, and for himself he claims nothing but the unappreciated production of what nobody else would do, and the critical discovery of Plotinus's progress."-K. S. GUTHRIE
First published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Ancient biographies were more than accounts of the deeds of past heroes and guides for moral living. They were also arenas for debating pressing philosophical questions and establishing intellectual credentials, as Arthur P. Urbano argues in this study of biographies composed in Late Antiquity
Provides an overview of the history of ancient Greek and Roman philosophy. This volume contains papers, which treat topics in ancient philosophy, such as the problem of sources or the practice of ancient philosophical commentary and also explore the development of various disciplines, including mathematics, logic, grammar, physics, and medicine.
A fascinating portrait of the Pythagorean tradition, including a substantial account of the Neo-Pythagorean revival, and ending with Johannes Kepler on the threshold of modernism.
Being Koetschau's text of the De Principiis translated into English, together with an introduction and notes by G. W. Butterworth Origen's On First Principles was the first attempt to formulate a coherent system of Christian philosophy, and also the best expression of the theologian's general opinions. The work is divided into four parts: book one deals with God and creation, book two with creation (rational and irrational natures), providence, and redemption, and book four with the interpretation of Holy Scripture. Origen's views are based upon the authority of the Scriptures and Church tradition, and grounded upon the tenets of Neoplatonism. In On First Principles many maxims are given as to the nature of the Trinity, the person of Christ, and man's free will under the hand of Providence, most of which are considered Orthodox teachings. On the other hand, the principles found in this work that engendered controversy and were later condemned by the Fifth Ecumenical Council in 553, are the preexistence and transmigration of souls, and universal salvation at the consummation of the world. This edition, being Koetschau's English text translated from Rufinus' definitive Latin volume, contains selected fragments of St. Jerome's rendition and the meager remains of the original Greek texts in order to furnish a more comprehensive view of Origen's writings. Also included are in-depth introductions to Origin's life and works by the scholar G. W. Butterworth.
This highly readable 1912 volume explores the complications surrounding the idea of evil in the works of Plotinus (204-270 BC), the ancient Greek philosopher regarded as the founder of Neoplatonism. The focus is the reconciliation of an omnipotent deity with the existence of an apparently contingent and imperfect world.

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