An accessible introduction to the finite element method for solving numeric problems, this volume offers the keys to an important technique in computational mathematics. Suitable for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses, it outlines clear connections with applications and considers numerous examples from a variety of science- and engineering-related specialties.This text encompasses all varieties of the basic linear partial differential equations, including elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic problems, as well as stationary and time-dependent problems. Additional topics include finite element methods for integral equations, an introduction to nonlinear problems, and considerations of unique developments of finite element techniques related to parabolic problems, including methods for automatic time step control. The relevant mathematics are expressed in non-technical terms whenever possible, in the interests of keeping the treatment accessible to a majority of students.
This accessible introduction offers the keys to an important technique in computational mathematics. It outlines clear connections with applications and considers numerous examples from a variety of specialties. 1987 edition.
This introduction to the theory of Sobolev spaces and Hilbert space methods in partial differential equations is geared toward readers of modest mathematical backgrounds. It offers coherent, accessible demonstrations of the use of these techniques in developing the foundations of the theory of finite element approximations. J. T. Oden is Director of the Institute for Computational Engineering & Sciences (ICES) at the University of Texas at Austin, and J. N. Reddy is a Professor of Engineering at Texas A&M University. They developed this essentially self-contained text from their seminars and courses for students with diverse educational backgrounds. Their effective presentation begins with introductory accounts of the theory of distributions, Sobolev spaces, intermediate spaces and duality, the theory of elliptic equations, and variational boundary value problems. The second half of the text explores the theory of finite element interpolation, finite element methods for elliptic equations, and finite element methods for initial boundary value problems. Detailed proofs of the major theorems appear throughout the text, in addition to numerous examples.
An introduction to the application of the finite element method to the solution of boundary and initial-value problems posed in terms of partial differential equations. Contains worked examples throughout and each chapter has a set of exercises with detailed solutions.
This book is a tutorial written by researchers and developers behind the FEniCS Project and explores an advanced, expressive approach to the development of mathematical software. The presentation spans mathematical background, software design and the use of FEniCS in applications. Theoretical aspects are complemented with computer code which is available as free/open source software. The book begins with a special introductory tutorial for beginners. Following are chapters in Part I addressing fundamental aspects of the approach to automating the creation of finite element solvers. Chapters in Part II address the design and implementation of the FEnicS software. Chapters in Part III present the application of FEniCS to a wide range of applications, including fluid flow, solid mechanics, electromagnetics and geophysics.
This is the 2005 second edition of a highly successful and well-respected textbook on the numerical techniques used to solve partial differential equations arising from mathematical models in science, engineering and other fields. The authors maintain an emphasis on finite difference methods for simple but representative examples of parabolic, hyperbolic and elliptic equations from the first edition. However this is augmented by new sections on finite volume methods, modified equation analysis, symplectic integration schemes, convection-diffusion problems, multigrid, and conjugate gradient methods; and several sections, including that on the energy method of analysis, have been extensively rewritten to reflect modern developments. Already an excellent choice for students and teachers in mathematics, engineering and computer science departments, the revised text includes more latest theoretical and industrial developments.
A powerful tool for the approximate solution of differential equations, the finite element is extensively used in industry and research. This book offers students of engineering and physics a comprehensive view of the principles involved, with numerous illustrative examples and exercises. Starting with continuum boundary value problems and the need for numerical discretization, the text examines finite difference methods, weighted residual methods in the context of continuous trial functions, and piecewise defined trial functions and the finite element method. Additional topics include higher order finite element approximation, mapping and numerical integration, variational methods, and partial discretization and time-dependent problems. A survey of generalized finite elements and error estimates concludes the text.
This book gives an introduction to the finite element method as a general computational method for solving partial differential equations approximately. Our approach is mathematical in nature with a strong focus on the underlying mathematical principles, such as approximation properties of piecewise polynomial spaces, and variational formulations of partial differential equations, but with a minimum level of advanced mathematical machinery from functional analysis and partial differential equations. In principle, the material should be accessible to students with only knowledge of calculus of several variables, basic partial differential equations, and linear algebra, as the necessary concepts from more advanced analysis are introduced when needed. Throughout the text we emphasize implementation of the involved algorithms, and have therefore mixed mathematical theory with concrete computer code using the numerical software MATLAB is and its PDE-Toolbox. We have also had the ambition to cover some of the most important applications of finite elements and the basic finite element methods developed for those applications, including diffusion and transport phenomena, solid and fluid mechanics, and also electromagnetics.​
A rigorous and thorough mathematical introduction to the subject; A clear and concise treatment of modern fast solution techniques such as multigrid and domain decomposition algorithms; Second edition contains two new chapters, as well as many new exercises; Previous edition sold over 3000 copies worldwide
This definitive introduction to finite element methods was thoroughly updated for this 2007 third edition, which features important material for both research and application of the finite element method. The discussion of saddle-point problems is a highlight of the book and has been elaborated to include many more nonstandard applications. The chapter on applications in elasticity now contains a complete discussion of locking phenomena. The numerical solution of elliptic partial differential equations is an important application of finite elements and the author discusses this subject comprehensively. These equations are treated as variational problems for which the Sobolev spaces are the right framework. Graduate students who do not necessarily have any particular background in differential equations, but require an introduction to finite element methods will find this text invaluable. Specifically, the chapter on finite elements in solid mechanics provides a bridge between mathematics and engineering.
The main theme is the integration of the theory of linear PDE and the theory of finite difference and finite element methods. For each type of PDE, elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic, the text contains one chapter on the mathematical theory of the differential equation, followed by one chapter on finite difference methods and one on finite element methods. The chapters on elliptic equations are preceded by a chapter on the two-point boundary value problem for ordinary differential equations. Similarly, the chapters on time-dependent problems are preceded by a chapter on the initial-value problem for ordinary differential equations. There is also one chapter on the elliptic eigenvalue problem and eigenfunction expansion. The presentation does not presume a deep knowledge of mathematical and functional analysis. The required background on linear functional analysis and Sobolev spaces is reviewed in an appendix. The book is suitable for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students of applied mathematics and engineering.
This text presenting the mathematical theory of finite elements is organized into three main sections. The first part develops the theoretical basis for the finite element methods, emphasizing inf-sup conditions over the more conventional Lax-Milgrim paradigm. The second and third parts address various applications and practical implementations of the method, respectively. It contains numerous examples and exercises.
The subject of partial differential equations holds an exciting and special position in mathematics. Partial differential equations were not consciously created as a subject but emerged in the 18th century as ordinary differential equations failed to describe the physical principles being studied. The subject was originally developed by the major names of mathematics, in particular, Leonard Euler and Joseph-Louis Lagrange who studied waves on strings; Daniel Bernoulli and Euler who considered potential theory, with later developments by Adrien-Marie Legendre and Pierre-Simon Laplace; and Joseph Fourier's famous work on series expansions for the heat equation. Many of the greatest advances in modern science have been based on discovering the underlying partial differential equation for the process in question. James Clerk Maxwell, for example, put electricity and magnetism into a unified theory by establishing Maxwell's equations for electromagnetic theory, which gave solutions for prob lems in radio wave propagation, the diffraction of light and X-ray developments. Schrodinger's equation for quantum mechanical processes at the atomic level leads to experimentally verifiable results which have changed the face of atomic physics and chemistry in the 20th century. In fluid mechanics, the Navier Stokes' equations form a basis for huge number-crunching activities associated with such widely disparate topics as weather forecasting and the design of supersonic aircraft. Inevitably the study of partial differential equations is a large undertaking, and falls into several areas of mathematics.
A practical and concise guide to finite difference and finite element methods. Well-tested MATLAB® codes are available online.
This book introduces finite difference methods for both ordinary differential equations (ODEs) and partial differential equations (PDEs) and discusses the similarities and differences between algorithm design and stability analysis for different types of equations. A unified view of stability theory for ODEs and PDEs is presented, and the interplay between ODE and PDE analysis is stressed. The text emphasizes standard classical methods, but several newer approaches also are introduced and are described in the context of simple motivating examples.
The ?nite element method is the most powerful general-purpose technique for comput­ing accurate solutions to partial differential equations. Understanding and Implementing the Finite Element Method is essential reading for those interested in understanding both the theory and the implementation of the ?nite element method for equilibrium problems. This book contains a thorough derivation of the finite element equations as well as sections on programming the necessary calculations, solving the finite element equations, and using a posteriori error estimates to produce validated solutions. Accessible introductions to advanced topics, such as multigrid solvers, the hierarchical basis conjugate gradient method, and adaptive mesh generation, are provided. Each chapter ends with exercises to help readers master these topics. Understanding and Implementing the Finite Element Method includes a carefully documented collection of MATLAB® programs implementing the ideas presented in the book. Readers will bene?t from a careful explanation of data structures and speci?c coding strategies and will learn how to write a ?nite element code from scratch. Students can use the MATLAB codes to experiment with the method and extend them in various ways to learn more about programming ?nite elements. This practical book should provide an excellent foundation for those who wish to delve into advanced texts on the subject, including advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students in mathematics, engineering, and the physical sciences.Preface; Part I: The Basic Framework for Stationary Problems. Chapter 1: Some Model PDEs; Chapter 2: The weak form of a BVP; Chapter 3: The Galerkin method; Chapter 4: Piecewise polynomials and the finite element method; Chapter 5: Convergence of the finite element method; Part II Data Structures and Implementation. Chapter 6: The mesh data structure; Chapter 7: Programming the finite element method: Linear Lagrange triangles; Chapter 8: Lagrange triangles of arbitrary degree; Chapter 9: The finite element method for general BVPs; Part III: Solving the Finite Element Equations. Chapter 10: Direct solution of sparse linear systems; Chapter 11: Iterative methods: Conjugate gradients; Chapter 12: The classical stationary iterations; Chapter 13: The multigrid method; Part IV: Adaptive Methods. Chapter 14: Adaptive mesh generation; Chapter 15: Error estimators and indicators; Bibliography; Index.
Textbook for teaching computational mathematics.
lead the reader to a theoretical understanding of the subject without neglecting its practical aspects. The outcome is a textbook that is mathematically honest and rigorous and provides its target audience with a wide range of skills in both ordinary and partial differential equations." --Book Jacket.
Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations: Finite Difference and Finite Volume Methods focuses on two popular deterministic methods for solving partial differential equations (PDEs), namely finite difference and finite volume methods. The solution of PDEs can be very challenging, depending on the type of equation, the number of independent variables, the boundary, and initial conditions, and other factors. These two methods have been traditionally used to solve problems involving fluid flow. For practical reasons, the finite element method, used more often for solving problems in solid mechanics, and covered extensively in various other texts, has been excluded. The book is intended for beginning graduate students and early career professionals, although advanced undergraduate students may find it equally useful. The material is meant to serve as a prerequisite for students who might go on to take additional courses in computational mechanics, computational fluid dynamics, or computational electromagnetics. The notations, language, and technical jargon used in the book can be easily understood by scientists and engineers who may not have had graduate-level applied mathematics or computer science courses. Presents one of the few available resources that comprehensively describes and demonstrates the finite volume method for unstructured mesh used frequently by practicing code developers in industry Includes step-by-step algorithms and code snippets in each chapter that enables the reader to make the transition from equations on the page to working codes Includes 51 worked out examples that comprehensively demonstrate important mathematical steps, algorithms, and coding practices required to numerically solve PDEs, as well as how to interpret the results from both physical and mathematic perspectives
This textbook is a completely revised, updated, and expanded English edition of the important Analyse fonctionnelle (1983). In addition, it contains a wealth of problems and exercises (with solutions) to guide the reader. Uniquely, this book presents in a coherent, concise and unified way the main results from functional analysis together with the main results from the theory of partial differential equations (PDEs). Although there are many books on functional analysis and many on PDEs, this is the first to cover both of these closely connected topics. Since the French book was first published, it has been translated into Spanish, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Romanian, Greek and Chinese. The English edition makes a welcome addition to this list.

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