This textbook is endorsed by OCR and supports the specification for A-Level Classical Civilisation (first teaching September 2017). It covers Components 31 and 34 from the 'Beliefs and Ideas' Component Group: Greek Religion by Athina Mitropoulos and Julietta Steinhauer Democracy and the Athenians by Tim Morrison and James Renshaw Why was worshipping the gods so important to ancient Greek life? To what extent did Greeks question religious belief? How and why did the Athenians invent democracy? How does Athenian democracy compare with democracy today? Drawing on modern scholarship and using a wide variety of illustrations, this book guides A-Level students to a greater understanding of these issues. It explores the fundamental features of Greek religion, as well as its major centres such as Delphi and Olympia. It then moves on to analyse the development and workings of Athenian democracy, as well as reflecting on ancient critiques of it, both celebratory and critical. The ideal preparation for the final examinations, all content is presented by experts and experienced teachers in a clear and accessible narrative. Ancient literary and visual sources are described and analysed, with supporting images. Helpful student features include study questions, quotations from contemporary scholars, further reading, and boxes focusing in on key people, events and terms. Practice questions and exam guidance prepare students for assessment. A Companion Website is available at www.bloomsbury.com/class-civ-as-a-level.
This textbook is endorsed by OCR and supports the specification for A-Level Classical Civilisation (first teaching September 2017). It covers Components 23 and 24 from the 'Culture and the Arts' Component Group: Invention of the Barbarian by Alastair Thorley Greek Art by Athina Mitropoulos and Laura Snook What image did the ancient Greeks have of themselves and others? How and why were men and women represented differently in Greek art? To what extent is modern western ideology still influenced by ancient Greek attitudes towards the east? This book offers both A-Level students and their teachers the opportunity to consider these and many other important questions. The ideas prevalent in fifth-century Athens retain their powerful influence across the modern world, regardless of whether we agree that they should. The ideal preparation for the final examinations, all content is presented by experts and experienced teachers in a clear and accessible narrative. Ancient literary and visual sources are described and analysed, with supporting images. Helpful student features include study questions, quotations from contemporary scholars, further reading, and boxes focusing in on key people, events and terms. Practice questions and exam guidance prepare students for assessment. A Companion Website is available at www.bloomsbury.com/class-civ-as-a-level.
This textbook is endorsed by OCR and supports the specification for AS and A-Level Classical Civilisation (first teaching September 2017). It covers Components 21 and 22 from the 'Culture and the Arts' Component Group: Greek Theatre by James Renshaw and Laura Swift Imperial Image by Robert Hancock-Jones Why was tragedy and comedy so central to Athenian life? How did drama challenge Athenians to reflect on their way of living? How did the emperor Augustus present himself as the restorer of Rome's greatness? To what extent did he provide an example to later political figures as a promoter of his regime? This book guides AS and A-Level students to a greater understanding of these issues. The Greek Theatre chapter explores the festival context in which tragedies and comedies were performed, and then analyses three plays: Oedipus the King by Sophocles, Bacchae by Euripides and Frogs by Aristophanes. The Imperial Image chapter analyses the self-presentation of Rome's most dynamic emperor, who claimed to have found Rome 'a city of bricks, but left it a city of marble'. The ideal preparation for the final examinations, all content is presented by experts and experienced teachers in a clear and accessible narrative. Ancient literary and visual sources are described and analysed, with supporting images. Helpful student features include study questions, quotations from contemporary scholars, further reading, and boxes focusing in on key people, events and terms. Practice questions and exam guidance prepare students for assessment. A Companion Website is available at www.bloomsbury.com/class-civ-as-a-level.
This textbook is endorsed by OCR and supports the specification for A-Level Classical Civilisation (first teaching September 2017). It covers Components 32 and 33 from the 'Beliefs and Ideas' Component Group: Love and Relationships by Matthew Barr and Alastair Thorley Politics of the Late Republic by Lucy Cresswell How was love interpreted and explained by the poets and philosophers of the ancient world? Why was Julius Caesar assassinated? How can we get to the intention behind the rhetoric of ancient sources? This book raises these and other key questions. A-Level students and their teachers will encounter ancient answers to issues ranging from sexuality and the impact of desire to the power of personality in politics. Such important and controversial themes can be examined through the prism of the ancient world. The ideal preparation for the final examinations, all content is presented by experts and experienced teachers in a clear and accessible narrative. Ancient literary and visual sources are described and analysed, with supporting images. Helpful student features include study questions, quotations from contemporary scholars, further reading, and boxes focusing in on key people, events and terms. Practice questions and exam guidance prepare students for assessment. A Companion Website is available at www.bloomsbury.com/class-civ-as-a-level.
This textbook is endorsed by OCR and supports the specifications for AS and A-Level Classical Civilisation (first teaching September 2017). It covers all three options for Component 11: World of the Hero (Homer's Iliad, Homer's Odyssey and Virgil's Aeneid). Why does the Trojan War continue to fascinate us? What makes Odysseus a hero? What links can be drawn between the Aeneid and today's global politics? This book guides AS and A-Level students to a greater understanding of the epics of Homer and Virgil, setting the poems in their cultural context and drawing on the scholarship of leading academics to explore the poetry, characters and underlying philosophies. The colour illustrations, from the Cyclops on a Greek pot to a photograph of protesting Yadizi women, reflect the universal impact and continuing relevance of these classical epics. The ideal preparation for the final examinations, all content is presented by an expert and experienced teacher in a clear and accessible narrative. Ancient literary sources are described and analysed. Helpful student features include study questions, quotations from contemporary scholars, further reading, and boxes focusing in on key people, events and terms. Practice questions and exam guidance prepare students for assessment. A Companion Website is available at www.bloomsbury.com/class-civ-as-a-level.
This textbook is endorsed by OCR and supports the specification for GCSE Classical Civilisation (first teaching September 2017). It covers the Thematic Study Component 11 and all three Literature and Culture options (Components 21–23): Thematic Study: Myth and Religion by Ben Greenley Literature and Culture 1: The Homeric World by Dan Menashe Literature and Culture 2: Roman City Life by James Renshaw Literature and Culture 3: War and Warfare by James Renshaw Why does Greek and Roman mythology remain so popular today? Why is the hero Odysseus such an interesting character? What was it like to watch a gladiatorial fight? Why was the Roman army so successful? This book guides GCSE students to a greater understanding of such issues. The opening chapter examines the lives of women in Greece and Rome, and also focuses on women in myth and legend. The following three chapters invite readers to explore the culture of the Mycenaeans, city life in the Roman world, and ancient Greek and Roman warfare, focusing both on aspects of ancient society and on related literature. The ideal preparation for the final examinations, all content is presented by experts and experienced teachers in a clear and accessible narrative. Ancient literary and visual sources are described and analysed, with supporting images and examples of non-prescribed sources. Helpful student features include study questions, activities, further reading, and boxes focusing in on key people, events and terms. Practice questions and exam guidance prepare students for assessment. A Companion Website is available at www.bloomsbury.com/class-civ-gcse.
This textbook is endorsed by OCR and supports the specification for AS and A-Level Ancient History (first teaching September 2017). It covers the whole of Component 1, both the compulsory Period Study and the three optional Depth Studies: Period Study: Relations between Greek states and between Greek and non-Greek states, 492–404 BC by Steve Matthews and James Renshaw Depth Study: The Politics and Society of Sparta, 478–404 BC by Charlie Cottam Depth Study: The Politics and Culture of Athens c. 460–399 BC by David L. S. Hodgkinson and James Renshaw Depth Study: The Rise of Macedon, 359–323 BC by Lucy Nicholas How and why did a small group of city states defy the might of the Persian Empire? Why did the same city states subsequently descend into 60 years of conflict among themselves? Were Sparta and Athens very different? How did Alexander later redefine the Greek world? These are the sort of questions that you are required to consider for A-Level Ancient History. This book investigates how the birth of democracy and the defeat of Persia allowed a flourish of political and philosophical thought that subsequently defined western civilisation. It further explores the contrasts between Spartan and Athenian culture. The ideal preparation for the final examinations, all content is presented by experts and experienced teachers in a clear and accessible narrative. Ancient literary and visual sources are described and analysed, with supporting images. Helpful student features include study questions, further reading, and boxes focusing in on key people, events and terms. Practice questions and exam guidance prepare students for assessment. A Companion Website is available at www.bloomsbury.com/ anc-hist-as-a-level.
This book is an English translation of the French work La Religion Grecque. Its purpose is to consider how religious beliefs and cultic rituals were given expression in ancient Greece. The chapters cover first ritual and then myth, rooting the account in the practices of the classical city while also taking seriously the world of the imagination. For this edition the bibliography has been substantially revised to meet the needs of a mainly student, English-speaking readership. The book is enriched throughout by illustrations, and by quotations from original sources.
This textbook is endorsed by OCR and supports the specification for GCSE Classical Civilisation (first teaching September 2017). It covers the Thematic Study Component 12 and all three Literature and Culture options (Components 21–23): Thematic Study: Women in the Ancient World by Robert Hancock-Jones Literature and Culture 1: The Homeric World by Dan Menashe Literature and Culture 2: Roman City Life by James Renshaw Literature and Culture 3: War and Warfare by James Renshaw How much can we know about the lives of women in the ancient world? Why is the hero Odysseus such an interesting character? What was it like to watch a gladiatorial fight? Why was the Roman army so successful? This book guides GCSE students to a greater understanding of such issues. The opening chapter examines the lives of women in Greece and Rome, and also focuses on women in myth and legend. The following three chapters invite readers to explore the culture of the Mycenaeans, city life in the Roman world, and ancient Greek and Roman warfare, focusing both on aspects of ancient society and on related literature. The ideal preparation for the final examinations, all content is presented by experts and experienced teachers in a clear and accessible narrative. Ancient literary and visual sources are described and analysed, with supporting images and examples of non-prescribed sources. Helpful student features include study questions, activities, further reading, and boxes focusing in on key people, events and terms. Practice questions and exam guidance prepare students for assessment. A Companion Website is available at www.bloomsbury.com/class-civ-gcse.
This textbook is endorsed by OCR and supports the specification for GCSE Ancient History (first teaching September 2017). It covers the whole of Component 1, both the compulsory Period Study and the three optional Depth Studies: Period Study: The Persian Empire, 559–465 BC by James Renshaw Depth Study: From Tyranny to Democracy, 546–483 BC by Sam Baddeley Depth Study: Athens in the Age of Pericles, 462–429 BC by Paul Fowler and James Renshaw Depth Study: Alexander the Great, 356–323 BC by Lucy Nicholas Was propaganda Persia's greatest weapon? How did Athens create democracy? Does Pericles' Athens deserve to be remembered as civilised or barbaric? How did Alexander dominate the ancient world by the age of 32? This book raises these and other key questions. GCSE students and their teachers will explore key political and social developments of the Greek and Persian worlds through the eyes of ancient historians and archaeology. This book invites us to look at ancient societies in a new light and helps explain the development of the modern world. The ideal preparation for the final examinations, all content is presented by experts and experienced teachers in a clear and accessible narrative. Ancient literary and visual sources are described and analysed, with supporting images. Helpful student features include study questions, further reading, and boxes focusing in on key people, events and terms. Practice questions and exam guidance prepare students for assessment. A Companion Website is available at www.bloomsbury.com/anc-hist-gcse.
This textbook is endorsed by OCR and supports the specification for A-Level Classical Civilisation (first teaching September 2017). It covers Components 23 and 24 from the 'Culture and the Arts' Component Group: Invention of the Barbarian by Alastair Thorley Greek Art by Athina Mitropoulos and Laura Snook What image did the ancient Greeks have of themselves and others? How and why were men and women represented differently in Greek art? To what extent is modern western ideology still influenced by ancient Greek attitudes towards the east? This book offers both A-Level students and their teachers the opportunity to consider these and many other important questions. The ideas prevalent in fifth-century Athens retain their powerful influence across the modern world, regardless of whether we agree that they should. The ideal preparation for the final examinations, all content is presented by experts and experienced teachers in a clear and accessible narrative. Ancient literary and visual sources are described and analysed, with supporting images. Helpful student features include study questions, quotations from contemporary scholars, further reading, and boxes focusing in on key people, events and terms. Practice questions and exam guidance prepare students for assessment. A Companion Website is available at www.bloomsbury.com/class-civ-as-a-level.
This textbook is endorsed by OCR and supports the specification for A-Level Classical Civilisation (first teaching September 2017). It covers Components 32 and 33 from the 'Beliefs and Ideas' Component Group: Love and Relationships by Matthew Barr and Alastair Thorley Politics of the Late Republic by Lucy Cresswell How was love interpreted and explained by the poets and philosophers of the ancient world? Why was Julius Caesar assassinated? How can we get to the intention behind the rhetoric of ancient sources? This book raises these and other key questions. A-Level students and their teachers will encounter ancient answers to issues ranging from sexuality and the impact of desire to the power of personality in politics. Such important and controversial themes can be examined through the prism of the ancient world. The ideal preparation for the final examinations, all content is presented by experts and experienced teachers in a clear and accessible narrative. Ancient literary and visual sources are described and analysed, with supporting images. Helpful student features include study questions, quotations from contemporary scholars, further reading, and boxes focusing in on key people, events and terms. Practice questions and exam guidance prepare students for assessment. A Companion Website is available at www.bloomsbury.com/class-civ-as-a-level.
This textbook supports the specification for AS and A-Level Ancient History (first teaching September 2017). It covers the whole of Component 2, both the compulsory Period Study and the three optional Depth Studies: Period Study: The Julio-Claudian Emperors, 31 BC–AD 68 by Robert Cromarty and James Harrison Depth Study: The Breakdown of the Late Republic, 88–31 BC by Steve Matthews Depth Study: The Flavians, AD 68–96 by Robert Cromarty Depth Study: Ruling Roman Britain, AD 43–c.128 by James Harrison How did Augustus change the Roman Constitution? Why was the Roman Republic doomed to fail? How did the Flavians re-invent the Imperial image? What was life like in Roman Britain? These are the sort of questions that you are required to consider for A-Level Ancient History. This textbook guides you through the use of power and politics in the Roman Senate and Imperial court from the Late Republic into the Principate. It considers individual ambition against the need for change, and substantive action against image and deception. The ideal preparation for the final examinations, all content is presented by experts and experienced teachers in a clear and accessible narrative. Ancient literary and visual sources are described and analysed, with supporting images. Helpful student features include study questions, further reading, and boxes focusing in on key people, events and terms. Practice questions and exam guidance prepare students for assessment. A Companion Website is available at www.bloomsbury.com/anc-hist-as-a-level.
In Search of the Greeks offers an engaging introduction to the societies of Classical Greece. Making extensive use of ancient sources and illustrated with some hundred and fifty photographs, drawings, maps and plans, many now for the first time in colour, the book introduces key topics of ancient Greece. The new edition opens with a new chapter that provides an historical overview of the key events, figures and eras, and continues with updated chapters on key topics in Greek history: religion and thought, Athenian democracy, Athenian society, Athenian drama, the Olympic Games and Sparta. Activity boxes and further reading lists throughout each chapter aid students' understanding of the subject. Appendices provide further information on Greek currency values, Greek musical instruments and the Greek calendar. Review questions throughout this book challenge students to read further and reflect on some of the most important social, political and cultural issues of classical Greece. Many topics raise issues of contemporary relevance, such as the rights of citizens in a democracy, forced marriage and approaches to education. The book is supported by a website which, contains comprehensive resources on the social, political and cultural issues of classical Greece.
Describes the history of Rome from its founding in the eighth century BCE to the fall of the Roman Empire in the fifth century CE.
No judgement of taste is innocent - we are all snobs. Pierre Bourdieu's Distinction brilliantly illuminates the social pretentions of the middle classes in the modern world, focusing on the tastes and preferences of the French bourgeoisie. First published in 1979, the book is at once a vast ethnography of contemporary France and a dissection of the bourgeois mind. In the course of everyday life we constantly choose between what we find aesthetically pleasing, and what we consider tacky, merely trendy, or ugly. Taste is not pure. Bourdieu demonstrates that our different aesth
The new RISC-V Edition of Computer Organization and Design features the RISC-V open source instruction set architecture, the first open source architecture designed to be used in modern computing environments such as cloud computing, mobile devices, and other embedded systems. With the post-PC era now upon us, Computer Organization and Design moves forward to explore this generational change with examples, exercises, and material highlighting the emergence of mobile computing and the Cloud. Updated content featuring tablet computers, Cloud infrastructure, and the x86 (cloud computing) and ARM (mobile computing devices) architectures is included. An online companion Web site provides advanced content for further study, appendices, glossary, references, and recommended reading. Features RISC-V, the first such architecture designed to be used in modern computing environments, such as cloud computing, mobile devices, and other embedded systems Includes relevant examples, exercises, and material highlighting the emergence of mobile computing and the cloud
Frantz Fanon was one of the twentieth century’s most important theorists of revolution, colonialism, and racial difference, and this, his masterwork, is a classic alongside Orientalism and The Autobiography of Malcolm X. The Wretched of the Earth is a brilliant analysis of the psychology of the colonized and their path to liberation. Bearing singular insight into the rage of colonized peoples and the role of violence in historical change, the book also incisively attacks postindependence disenfranchisement of the masses by the elite on one hand, and intertribal and interfaith animosities on the other. A veritable handbook of social reorganization for leaders of emerging nations, The Wretched of the Earth has had a major impact on civil rights, anticolonialism, and black-consciousness movements around the world. This new translation updates its language for a new generation of readers and its lessons are more vital now than ever.
In this brilliant work, the most influential philosopher since Sartre suggests that such vaunted reforms as the abolition of torture and the emergence of the modern penitentiary have merely shifted the focus of punishment from the prisoner's body to his soul.
Ancient Greek Religion provides an introduction to the fundamental beliefs, practices, and major deities of Greek religion. Focuses on Athens in the classical period Includes detailed discussion of Greek gods and heroes, myth and cult, and vivid descriptions of Greek religion as it was practiced Ancient texts are presented in boxes to promote thought and discussion, and abundant illustrations help readers visualize the rich and varied religious life of ancient Greece Revised edition includes additional boxed texts and bibliography, an 8-page color plate section, a new discussion of the nature of Greek “piety,” and a new chapter on Greek Religion and Greek Culture

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