Since his retirement as Archbishop of Canterbury and his return to academic life (Master of Magdalene College Cambridge) Rowan Williams has demonstrated a massive new surge of intellectual energy. In this new book he turns his attention to St Augustine. St Augustine not only shaped the development of Western theology, he also made a major contribution to political theory (City of God) and through his Confessions to the understanding of human psychology. Rowan Williams has an entirely fresh perspective on these matters and the chapter titles in this new book demonstrate this at a glance - 'Language Reality and Desire', 'Politics and the Soul', 'Paradoxes of Self Knowledge', 'Insubstantial Evil'. As with his previous titles, Dostoevsky, The Edge of Words and Faith in the Public Square this new study is sure to be a major contribution on a compelling subject.
This brief text assists students in understanding Augustine's philosophy and thinking so they can more fully engage in useful, intelligent class dialogue and improve their understanding of course content. Part of the Wadsworth Notes Series, (which will eventually consist of approximately 100 titles, each focusing on a single "thinker" from ancient times to the present), ON AUGUSTINE is written by a philosopher deeply versed in the philosophy of this key thinker. Like other books in the series, this concise book offers sufficient insight into the thinking of a notable philosopher, better enabling students to engage in reading and to discuss the material in class and on paper.
No philosopher speaks more immediately to the excesses of our twenty-first-century world and the limits of human reason than Augustine. It would be almost impossible to exaggerate the influence of Augustine—the once-hedonistic pagan turned ascetic theologian and defender of the early Christian Church—over all the subsequent history of Europe. Augustine ’s political philosophy is pregnant with arguments that racked not only Christian Europe but also much of the modern world. Whether it was his essential skepticism about the value of earthly politics when contrasted with eternity, the role of a Christian within the State, or the nature of just war and the folly of imperial ambitions, Augustine articulated distinctive and long-lived thoughts on controversial subjects that remain embedded in our political discourse. In On Augustine: The Two Cities Alan Ryan carefully lays out the complicated political, philosophical, and religious context of Augustine and traces the history of his impact on Western thought both within and beyond the Christian tradition. Excerpted here are: The City of God, Confessions.
This study demonstrates that Augustine’s De cura pro mortuis gerenda forms a well-composed unity of narrative and argument. It combines an analysis of the argumentative structure with a philological commentary, situating the text in its cultural-historical context.
One of Augustine's earliest prayers after his conversion was a prayer to understand himself and to discover God. He came to realize that al of us follow more or less the same path of discovery, a path that begins in darkness and moves toward wisdom. Although few achieve the perfection of wisdom, we can be certain that we are showing our love for God by reaching out in love to our fellow human beings. In Let Me Know You" Father Burt offers a rare reflection on the seven steps in Augustine's journey towards the Vision of God and suggests that they are also the stages we must go through in order to finally *see - the God of love for ourselves. Chapters are *Darkness, - *Pious Listening, - *Knowledge: The Path out of Darkness, - *Fortitude, - *Love, - *The Need for Purification, - and *Loving a Still Hidden God. - Donald X. Burt, OSA, PhD, professor emeritus of philosophy at Villanova University, has published widely on the philosophy of St. Augustine. His most recent books include *Let Me Know Myself . . ., - The Pilgrim God, and The River: Augustinian Reflections On a Flowing Life, published by Liturgical Press. "
No philosopher speaks moreimmediately to the excesses ofour twenty-first-century world andthe limits of human reason thanAugustine.
Abingdon Pillars of Theology is a series for the college and seminary classroom designed to help students grasp the basic and necessary facts, influence, and significance of major theologians. Written by major scholars, these books will outline the context, methodology, organizing principles, method, primary contributions, and major writings of people who have shaped theology as we know it today. For many, all theology subsequent to Augustine is a footnote. He is influential, even today, because of his doctrinal formulations, but even more important, Augustine is a stimulating thinker and constant inquirer. Starting with his philosophical interest in Platonism, which set the framework for his thinking, Eugene TeSelle examines the major themes of Augustine's thought following a more or less chronological order including human fulfillment, evil, creation, the human self, the church and its doctrines, the course of human history, and the relation of Christianity to political matters. Even those who think he was wrong in his conclusions can respect Augustine's willingness to confront problems and think through their implications. "This book on Augustine allows the reader to appreciate how easily one moves from the fourth or fifth century into modern times and back. Eugene TeSelle thus invites the reader to appreciate some of the most significant themes of Augustine’s thought--opening a kind of dialogue between Augustine and other thinkers on topics such as evil and grace, politics and piety, and more." Allan Fitzgerald, O.S.A., Istituto Patristico “Augustinianum,” Rome, Italy "This is an extraordinary book. Eugene TeSelle is one of the great masters of Augustine's thought, and here he draws upon his great erudition to present the father of Western theology cogently and comprehensively for the layperson. The book is at once short and accessible but also profound and thought-provoking; a sensitive treatment of Augustine in his own context, which also makes him wholly relevant for today. TeSelle raises the big questions and provides ample material to begin to answer them." Carol Harrison, Lecturer in the History and Theology of the Latin West, University of Durham, Durham, Great Britain Eugene TeSelle is emeritus Oberlin Alumni/ae Professor of Church History and Theology at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee.
This book contains a group of essays by internationally recognized scholars on Augustine's hermeneutical theory and practice of biblical exegesis attempting to understand Augustine (1) against his own intellectual background, (2) within his own works, and (3) in relation to traditional and contemporary discussions of biblical hermeneutics and exegesis. In the discussion of Augustine's theological works and pastoral sermons, consideration is given both to the science of hermeneutics and the art of exegesis. Ancient rhetoric, ancient philosophy, and earlier Christian exegetes are studied as they relate to Augustine as is Augustine's own synthesis. Augustine: Biblical Exegete sheds light on the continuity between the exegesis of earlier ages and our own.
Hannah Arendt began her scholarly career with an exploration of Saint Augustine's concept of caritas, or neighborly love, written under the direction of Karl Jaspers and the influence of Martin Heidegger. After her German academic life came to a halt in 1933, Arendt carried her dissertation into exile in France, and years later took the same battered and stained copy to New York. During the late 1950s and early 1960s, as she was completing or reworking her most influential studies of political life, Arendt was simultaneously annotating and revising her dissertation on Augustine, amplifying its argument with terms and concepts she was using in her political works of the same period. The disseration became a bridge over which Arendt traveled back and forth between 1929 Heidelberg and 1960s New York, carrying with her Augustine's question about the possibility of social life in an age of rapid political and moral change. In Love and Saint Augustine, Joanna Vecchiarelli Scott and Judith Chelius Stark make this important early work accessible for the first time. Here is a completely corrected and revised English translation that incorporates Arendt's own substantial revisions and provides additional notes based on letters, contracts, and other documents as well as the recollections of Arendt's friends and colleagues during her later years.
Augustine: From Rhetor to Theologian arose from a conference held at Trinity College, Toronto, to celebrate the 1600th anniversary of the conversion to Catholic Christianity of Augustine of Hippo. Fifteen papers from international scholars make up this book. Augustine set his stamp on the Latin Church, yet only in the twentieth century, with its profound, even paradigmatic change did the descendants of that church -- Anglican, Reformed, and Roman Catholic -- recognize the degree to which their inbred attitudes and theological positions were "Augustinian." It is, however, another measure of the importance of Augustine that many aspects of his life and meanings of his writings are still disputed. This continuing investigation and debate is evidenced in this volume.
The nature and development of Augustine’s understanding of the church between his conversion (386) and his forced entry into the clergy (391) provides an essential lens to understanding this seminal period of transition and the foundations of his future ecclesial contributions. Even so, most studies of Augustine’s ecclesiology bypass this period, starting with the clerical Augustine (post 391). In fact, research on the ‘young’ Augustine and the Confessions too often stalls over debates between his neo-Platonic or Christian orientation, focusing on dichotomies in Augustine or an individualistic Augustine too rigidly labeled. This book helps fill these gaps and provides a case study supporting arguments for continuity between the ‘young’ and the clerical Augustine. A careful chronological textual approach to Augustine’s early Christian years demonstrates how his ecclesiological thought began during this period and comprised a core component of his first theological synthesis. The emergence of his ecclesiological ideas was intimately intertwined with his overall personal, religious, philosophic, and theological development. As such it is crucial to our biographical and theological understanding of the great North African and will be of interest to specialists and students alike of Augustine’s development, Confessions, mature ecclesiology, and the late antique world.
A Companion to Augustine presents a fresh collection of scholarship by leading academics with a new approach to contextualizing Augustine and his works within the multi-disciplinary field of Late Antiquity, showing Augustine as both a product of the cultural forces of his times and a cultural force in his own right. Discusses the life and works of Augustine within their full historical context, rather than privileging the theological context Presents Augustine?s life, works and leading ideas in the cultural context of the late Roman world, providing a vibrant and engaging sense of Augustine in action in his own time and place Opens up a new phase of study on Augustine, sensitive to the many and varied perspectives of scholarship on late Roman culture State-of-the-art essays by leading academics in this field
Since the establishment of Christianity in the West as a major religious tradition, Augustine (354&–430 CE) has been considered a principal architect of the ways philosophy can be used for reasoning about faith. In particular, Augustine effected the joining of Platonism with Christian belief for the Middle Ages and beyond. The results of his enterprise continue to be felt, especially with regard to the contested topics of human embodiment, sexuality, and the nature and roles of women. As a result, few thinkers have been as problematic for feminists as he has been. He is the thinker that a number of feminists love to hate. What do feminist thinkers make of this problematic legacy? These lively essays address that question and provide thoughtful arguments for the value of engaging Augustine&’s ideas and texts anew by using the well-established methodologies that feminists have developed over the last thirty years. Augustine and his legacy have much to answer for, but these essays show that the body of his work also has much to offer as feminists explore, challenge, and reframe his thinking while forging new paradigms for construing gender, power, and notions of divinity.
Augustine and Manichaean Christianity offers groundbreaking discussions of Augustine’s enduring relation with Manichaeism, disclosing the essential background of writings such as Confessiones, De ordine and De vera religione and powerful concepts like his theories of memory and vision of God.

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